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M. L. 



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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 02317 2908 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/transactionsofhu1823hugu 



i 18 



TRANSACTIONS 



OF THE 



Huguenot Soqiety 



OF 



South Carolina 

No. 18 %*' (< 



1/9/J- /7 



PUBLISHED BY OR DEB OF THE SOCIETY 







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■£ *> ' ^., ^<_ If /a .• ^ V 

. 'ON . •" '-''' ;■ > ' . ' ^ 

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CHARLESTON, S. C. 



1911 



PRESS OK 

iVALKER, EVANS tt COGSWELL CO 

CHARLt'SIQN, t C 



182G700 



I he Committee on Publication 1- not respon>ible tor 
statements or opinions in original articles published from 

autln ir'.s manuscript or cerl itied cop\ . 



I In- Society I'm.-, or Badges ma) be obtained Ij mem- 
bers in -in the Secretary, postage tree, at tin- rate oj Si .50 
for silver enamel, or $4.00 tor gold enamel. I he pin 
represents the Seal of the Sociel> reduced 

Certificates ol Membership, with 'laic 01 election, \ ill 
be mailed to members alter election :i>.*oon as the\ can 
be signed and tilled iii, 






Members ol the Society are earnestly requested hi notify 
the Secretary of change in residence and l^ost ( Mice ad- 
dress, or change of name by marriage. Also of any death 
among the membership which may come to their knowl- 
edge. 



! lie unusual delay in the appearance 01 this number oi 
the Transactions has been unavoidable on account >>f long 
and serious indisposition of the Editor. It 1- hoped to 
resume the publication of ''Wills of South Carolina lln- 
sruenots" in the next issue. 






" 



OFFICERS 1911-1912 



PEESJDEN'I 

kkv. robkrt w ils< >n, d. d. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

For Charleston-- -STEP! IL.\ II l< ).\1 \S, 

Lor Puryslmrg- T. \V. L3ACCT1 , 

KorNcw Bordeaux (MAS. P. \LLSTON. 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Dr. J. BACH-MAN CHISOLM. 

HISTORIAN 

\\ iVl. G. MAZyCK. 

EXECUTIVE COM M 1 I TEE 

ARTHUR MAZYCK, 

Dr. T: GRANGE SL\I< )NS, 

111 I- 1 ). G. R \RK.KR, 

WILLIAM C. MILLER, 

JOHN B. REEVES. 

The President, Vice-Presidents, Secretary and Treas- 
urer, and Historian are cx-ofluio members of the Execu- 
tive Committee. 



MINUTES 



Charleston, S. ( '., April 19, ujn. 

The 26th Anniversary Meeting of the Huguenot Society 
of South Carolina was held this day at the South Carolina 
hall at 5 P. M. 3 a quorum being present. 

The meeting was called to order by the Rev. Robert Wil- 
son, D. D. 

The meeting was opened with prayer b\ Rev. Dr. Wil- 
son. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and con- 
firmed. 

The Treasurer read his report, which was received as 
information and ordered spread on the minutes. 

The Historian made his report, which was also ordered 
spread on the minutes. 

The President then submitted the report of the Execu- 
tive Committee, which was also put on the minutes. 

The following applications for membership were duly 
elected members of the Society: 



1. Mr. Samuel Porcher Philadelphia, Pa. 

2 Miss Katherine Cordes Porcher ....... ..Pinopolis, S. C. 

3 Mrs f.ihbie Shean Mood) .' Galveston, Texas. 

A. Mr. Phomas Clarkson Thompson ..Chattanooga, Tenn. 

5. Mrs. Antoinette Morris Proctor Monroe City, Mo. 

6. Mrs. Charlotte Cazenbve Bergman ........Alexandria, \'a 

7. Miss Caroline O. Knight Nicholasville. Ky. 

8. Mrs. Josephine Mann Gresham Galveston, Texas. 

9 Mrs. Corinne L. Squire New York Citv, N. Y. 

10. Mrs. Ellen Douglas Wither^poon Versailles, Ky. 

11. Mrs. Ethel Witherspoon Alexander Boston. Mass. 

12. Mrs. May Hardy McElroy Kansas City, Mo. 

13. Mr. Robert F. Woods Marion. S. C. 

14. Mrs Maldine W. Cappeal Galveston, Texas 

15. Miss A. L. W. Ermentroul Redding, Pa 

16. Mr. John S. Cuttino Columbia, S. C. 

17 Mr, Washburne Paul Pass Christain, Miss. 

18. Mrs. Ellen S. II. Sinkler - Charleston, S. C. 



19. Mrs. \>. V. i . Turner ... \A ,•. Smyrna, I In 

20. Miss Charlotte C. Hall Connor ' Brooklyn, 

21. Mrs. Josephine Gresham Armstrong Galveston, fexa- 

22. Mrs. Louis Mann Selkirk Galveston, T< 

23. Mrs. Anne Minis Wright . Jackson, .\li«-. 

24. Mrs. Katherine Bostick Allan ..( >range, ! 

25. Mr. J'». J. R. Bostick .. .' New Vork City, N. \ 



26. Mrs. I'annie Cam Johnson 

27. Mis* Inez U. Parry 

28. Mrs. Mamie Ravene! Gaillari] 

29. Mr. Leroy 11. Butler . 

30. Miss lessie Butler 



M< xico, 1 
I harle*ton. S I 
l harleston. S I 

Georgetown, S. C. 

. Georgetown, S. C. 



There were no resignations, and the following deaths* 

Dr. J. S. Buist. 
Miss Rebecca Alston. 
Mr. John 11. Porcher. 
Mrs. Alary Al. Broun. 
Mr. Maicolrn McBeth: 
Air. Joseph Manigault. 
Mi.^s Susan II. Perroneau. 

The Treasurer's books for 1910-19I] were reported, as 
found correct and neatly kept. 

The Committee consisting of Robert G. Thomas and M. 
deLisle Haig were appointed to nominate officers for the 
ensuing year; they nominated die officers the same a.-, last 
year: 

President, Rev. Robert Wilson, I ). 1). 

Vice-President for Charleston, Stephen Thomas. 

Vice-President for Purysburg, I W. Racot. 

Vice-President for New Bordeaux, Charles I*. Allstou. 

Secretary and Treasurer, Dr. J. Bachman Chisohn. 

Historian, Win. G. Mazyck. 

Executive Committee: Arthur Mazyck, Dr. T. Grange 
Simons, Tlieo. G. Barker, Win. C. Miller, John B. Reeves. 

There being no further business the Society adjourned. 
Before adjournment, however, they partook of a colla- 
tion, which was greatly enjoyed. 

J. BACHMAN CHISOLM, Sccretarv. 









7 



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i.s.s 

J 
v 

Is. 

( 



STATEMENT. 
|. Bachman Chisolm, Treasurer. 



ror y<. 
April 13; 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY KE< El P'J > 1910. 
For year 1910 to 1911; April 13, 1910 to \pril 19, 1911. 






1 

To balance from last year : $3N5.10 

To Judge Clearwater, return of R. K. expenses to 

Charleston 52. 40 

To members, dues collected from April 13. 1910 

to April 19, 1911 374.12 

To sale of pins for year .. .. 48.22 

To sale of Transactions for the year ... 33.50 

To interest on permanent fund for year 13.03 

$906.37 

DISBURSEM ENTS. 
April 16. 1010. 

By paid Evening Post for meeting $ 3.00 

By paid E. T. Viett on account for site of 

French Church 100.00 

By paid Dr. Wilson's dues. Huguenot Society of 

America 5.00 

By paid South Carolina Society for rent of Hall 6.00 
By paid postage for envelopes, 500 copies 10.62 

By paid judge Clearwater K. I\ expenses to 

Charleston 52.40 

By paid News & Courier for advertising meeting 3.80 
By paid E. T. Viett, balance for site of French 

Church 62.70 

By paid Walker. Evans & Cogswell Co, their bill 1.90 
By paid for collation at Anniversary Meeting . . 35. (it) 

By paid Miss Carry fur typewriting 2.30 

By paid for ten gold pins 37.50 

By paid hall rent for Freundschafls' Bund 15.00 

By paid postage for Transactions 15.00 

By paid Dr. Wilson's dues for Huguenot Society 

of Condon' . : .5.25 

By paid postage for sending out pin- .o0 

By paid Walker. Fva.ns X- Cogswell Co. on ac- 
count, for Transactions 17 100.00 

By paid for ten gold pins 57 50 

By paid W. G. Mazyck for printing Post Cards... 10.25 
By paid |. Bachman Chisolm, c<«nmissiori for 

year 'ending April 19, Oil 45.58 

$549.40 

BALANCE. 

Permanent fund $334.46 

General fund 22.61 

— 356.97 

$906.37 

Permanent fund on deposit in Charleston Savings Institution. 
General fund On deposit in Miners & Merchant- Bank. 



PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS. 



Ladies and Gentlemen oj the llmjiieuul Society: 

It has been said by someone, whose name and work J 
have forgotten, that ''the dead never grow old," and this 
ib so true in the experience of ns all, that when tho:>e who 
have long ago preceded us to the goal of our common and 
inevitable journey return in the visions of the night or as 
the phantasms oi a fevered imagination, or show them 
selves for a moment through the parted curtains of mem- 
ory, we always see them just as we saw them last, and 
should be greatly shocked and disappointed to find that 
they had been keeping even pace with us along the highway 
of time and gathering the same waymarks which have 
wrought such changes upon us. We never try to equalize 
the balance by aging them down to our level, preferring 
instead the vain effort to cast off the gathered burden of 
our years and meet them as they left us, with failure as the 
invariable result. But it is otherwise when the personal 
note has been eliminated and we recall with pardonable 
pride the generation from whom we derive our descent, not 
only to do honor to their memories, but to quicken the 
hereditary life which never dies except with the extinction 
— if there be a true extinction— of a race. For that which 
is denied to the individual \? the privelege of the family, 
and the life which Lives on through the ages, unbroken and 
unmarred by time, is not the seed of the annual plant, but 
the root life of the mighty tree, winch ever keeps itself 
fresh and flourishing by the young and vigorous verdure 
that is always ready to replace the aging foliage as it withers 
and falls. \t is this truth, fellow members of the FTugiienot 
Society, which makes our Organization not only a privelege 
but an obligation. :\nd it is the sense of this obligaiton 
which impels me to urge it upon you, in some form or 
other, on each recurring Anniversary, when it may be my 
privelege to address von. 






We are not here to Haunt ourselves in the plumes of a 
noble ancestry who perhaps would have been little disposed 
to lend them to .some of us could they have known us as 
well as we have learned to know them; nor is it to 
glorify them with characteristics and virtues which in most 
eases are very probably imaginary, for unless we get 
beyond these things we have no rejoinder for the sneers and 
jibes so often evoked by the very name of ancestor. But 
when an aggregation of individual lives, whatever the 
varied value of their individual characters, is strong enough 
and great enough to impress a record on the world's history 
'which makes .for the good of society and illustrate the 
highest principles by which humanity is advanced, it be- 
comes the sacred duty of those in whose pulses that life 
still throbs to live as it might have been lived by those 
who gave it for our inheritance, had they been favored as 
we are by the helplul development of knowledge and ex- 
perience that the passing centuries have brought to us. In 
other words we are .living the very lives of our lluguenot 
ancestors, with the very strongest elements of those lives 
as their legacy to us, for it is only the. strongest elements 
that persist, the weaker being merged and lost in the 
stronger lives with which they have mingled, but we are 
free from the cruder and darker enviroment which hamp- 
ered them and favored with a new. brighter, developed 
enviroment, the product of two. or three centuries of prog- 
ress and growth in knowledge and experience greater by 
main' degrees than the world ever gained in lourfold that 
duration o\ tune before. Therefore our duly to our blood 
is not to rest content and sell satisfied in the supposed glow 
oi a luster gained from it, but so to cultivate, improve 
and use for the world's good the best elements of that 
blood, as to make our lives a credit and an ornament to 
the memories of those from whom we derived it. To try 
and reflect more honor on our ancestors' than that ancestory 
has bequeathed to us. But a truce to moralizing which is 
apt to be wearisome, and let us get to business. 

Again on this 27th Anniversary of our organization it is 






IO 



in)' privilege and pleasure tu congratulate >ou upon our 
steady growth in numbers, the wide diffusion of winch 
gives evidence of the deepening and extending interest in 
our objects. A glance at our list of members is sufficient 
to show that we are no longer a local institution, although 
the management of our interests must remain in the hands 
of our local membership. 

This very fact, how ewer, should make us realize our 
obligations to our fellow members in every portion of the 
Untied States' and in Luirope lo consider their claims and 
requirements in all our legislation, and to be alert m detect- 
ing and enacting such modifications in our rules and by- 
laws as these changed conditions may require, especially 
we should bear in mind that the only actual value which our 
non-resident members receive is in the contents of our 
modest annual volume of Transactions, and these should 
be made to assume a broader scope and a deeper historic 
interest. 1 would again urge upon you who are on the 
ground to exert yourselves more actively in supplying ma- 
terials for your publishing committee, and thus strengthen 
their hands and lighten their labors; and 1 would appeal 
to our non-resident members to bear in mind thai they 
share our obligation in this matter and to assure them 
that any contribution of Huguenot literature of historic 
interest will be gladly received and gratefully used, the 
inalienable editorial right of the Blue Pencil being always 
reserved, but applied only with moderation and Aur con- 
sideration* tor the author or contributor. 

Of the thirty applications which we present for election 
seven are credited to South Carolina, five to Texas, four 
to New York, and the others respectively to Pennsylvania, 
Tennessee, Missouri, Virginia, Kentucky, Massachusetts, 
Mississippi, Florida and the United States Army. 

There has been no resignation but we note with sadness 
that six have been claimed by death and have passed from 
our earthly fellowship, their names, however, remain per- 
manently as an historic record, upon our scroll of member- 
ship. This leaves us a net increase of 24, arid our present 
number 421. 



J 



11 

kKrok'T OF iiis'K )ki \x 



A list oi Pamphlets, Magazines, and oilier Periodicals 
received from Societies and individuals tor the Huguenot 
Sonet)- of South Carolina. 

i. The Historical Society oi I'enn. Magazine of His- 
tory and Biography. Vol. J4, No. 134; Vol. 34, No. [36. 

2. Rhode Island Historical Society. Proceedings 01 
1906 to 1907 and K)P7 to 1908. 

3. State Historical Society of Missouri. Review Vol. 
4, No. 3; Vol. 4, No. 4; Vol. 5, No. t; Vo.1. 5, No. 2. 

4. South Carolina Historical Society. Magazine, Vol. 
II, No. 2 ; Vol. II, Nos. 3 and 4; Vol. [2, No. J. 

5. Bowdoin College. Bulletin Administration January 
[910, and Library report, April 1010. Bulletin No. 32. 
Address and Poem, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and 
Bulletin, April 1909.; and early days of Church and Slate 
in Maine. 

6. Annals of Iowa, Vol. <j, Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 

7. The State Society of Wisconsin. "Three Wiscon- 
sin Cushings." Wisconsin Historical Collection, Vol; 19, 
and Proceedings of I91O. 

8. Fornvannen, 1909. By limil Fkhoff. 

9. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, I). C. .An- 
nual Report of the American Historical Association, Vol 

1, 1908. 

10. Thos. L. Brown presented The journal of Amer- 
ican History, containing Life of Commodore Maury. 

11. The North Carolina Historical Society, Vol. 0, No. 

2, 1910. 

12. LesFreres Gibert, by Ben-bit, 1889. 

13. New York State Historical Association. Vol. 11. 
1910. 

14. The Huguenot Society of London. By-laws and 
list of Fellows, 1910. Also proceedings of The Huguenot 
Society o\ London, Vol. 9, No. 2, iqio. 



12 



i5- University of California. Vol. i and 7 pamphlets. 

iu. Yale University Library. Brass Industry. Luther 
variations in Sentence Arrangement, by Paul Curtis. The 
Revolutionary History of Fort No. H. 

17. Kansas Stale Historical Society. Collection Vol. 
No. 1 1 , 1909 to 1910. 

18. The New York Genealogical and Biographic. So- 
ciety. J be Record, April, 19] 1 

Respectfully submitted, 



\YM. G. iMAZYCK, Libn 



irtiin. 



\pril 19, 191 1 . 



AN ACCOUNT OF THE PORCH KK FAMILY L\ 

TJ1F1R.OLD AND NEW IIOMKS. WTI II MIL 

STORY OF TWO RFMARKA.BLF MKX, 

AND ONF STRANG K COIN* ADENCE 






fhere are so many persons either members of, or re- 
lated to, the Porcher family in South Carolina, thai pos- 
sibly some of them, at least, ma\ take an interest in the 
account of a quest I made some years ago in France, in 
search oJ information in regard to the Huguenot emigrant, 
Dr. Isaac Porcher, which led me to his old home, the town 
of Samte-Sevcre in the Province oi Berry. 

I am opceialh induced to relate this story, since I 1111 
derstand that in late years the interest in all such matters 
has greatly increased; the working stalls oi all the large 
libraries being kept bnsv minting through old records and 
manuscripts, in search of genealogical information. It 
seems a duty, therefore, to publish that which lias been 
gathered with considerable trouble. This is my excuse for 
writing this paper; and, if the personal pronoun has to 
be used rather frequently in it, I beg, in advance, the par- 
don of my readers, it haying been a personally conducted 
quest. 



*3 



Jt must be confessed that it was curiosity thai led me 
into the search 1 speak of. 1 scented a mystery, kepi ii in 
my mind for years, and finally, when the opportunity came, 
settled it to my own satisfaction— thereb) discovering 
some things about the Porcher family in their old home 
in France which interested me;- it remains lo be -ieen 
whether they will interest anyone else. 

Many years ago bread in a newspaper, wlm.li I unfor- 
tunately did not keep, an account .'of a certain Dr. Porcher 
of France, who, it was said, having been ennobled by 
Napoleon, was known as the Count Porcher de kiehebourg. 
lie pursued a career ol more or less glory during the 
latter years ol the eighteenth and the beginning of the 
nineteenth centuries, and was decided!) a person of dis- 
tinction in his day. 

I was struck, at once, by the similarity oi names, as ! 
had heard our own ancestor spoken ol as "Porcher de 
kichebourg"; and I felt some curiosity to know the con- 
nection between the two men. 

Later 1 read Idurkes account of the Porcher family, 
given in his "Landed Gentry in Kngiand in t«S<>$," where 
I again found the name oi Porcher tie kichebourg, and 
was confirmed in m\ idea of the probable relationship. I»\ 
this time I had also learned something of the de kiche- 
bourg tannic in South Carolina; and of the ke\ Claude 
Philhppe de kichebourg, the I lugucMuu "emigrant and pa>- 
tor. 

Some years ago, 1, myself, went to Trance; and there, 
thanks to some fortunate introductions, given me by my 
kinsman. Mr. Wilmot 1). Pocher, of Charleston, I visited 
the homes of two distant cousins, (two hundred years re- 
moved, as they themselves said)'. They were Mine. Cyprien 
Girerd, of Orleans, whose husband at the time of my visit, 
was treasurer General ^\ the Department oi the Loire'. 
and her brother, M. Charles Duvernet, of the Chateau au 
Coudray, near la Chatre in Berry. 

Thus 1 had gotten to the center of things, so to speak; 
for the grandmother of Mine. Girerd and M. Duvernet. 



14 



had been a Mademoiselle Porcher; and a niece of the Abbe 
Porcher de Lissaunay, and his brother, Dr. Giles Porcher, 
afterwards well known a:^ ihe Count Porcher tie Riche 
bourg. 

These French Cousins, whom I came thus tortunatel) 
to know, were much interested in hearing aboui their re- 
lations over the sea. as the)/ were entirely unaware thai 
ail) member oi the family had escaped from France during 
the Huguenol persecutions; though the) were quite ready 
to believe that it had been the. case. "Some of the >er) 
best blood in I' ranee went out with the Lfuguent*ts,' as 
one of them exclaimed, "and it is a loss from which the 
countr) has never recovered." 

Seeing my interest m all that concerned the family. 
.Mine. Girerd Kan me a manuscript which had been written 
b) her father, Al. Robin lJuvernet; and her brother, Al. 
Charles Duvernet, tor tlie same kindl) reason, gave me a 
histor) of La ( .hatre, sister town to Sainte-Severe, and 
which, as I found, contained much about the Porchers of 
that part of France. I hns inv information was accumu- 
lating 

To begin, however, with I'mrke. he says: "ibis Jamil; 
(Porchers) is of French extraction. Their forefathers 
were French Huguenots, who foresook their native countr) 
at the Revocation of the Fdict of Mantes t K-S^t, where, 
on the banks of the Loire, the Comics Porcher de kiche 
bourg, the ancestral senior line, until lately existed. 

"Of the name we lind two raised to the Peerage, 
Stephen Porcher de Joigny, ennobled by Chas. \ .. and 
the above Count Porcher de Richebourg. Ihey are traced 
to a very ancient date; the originator of the famil) being 
Simon le Porcher, hereditar) grand huntsman to Flugh 
Capet, the founder of the hreneh Monarchy, from whose 
official duty of slaying the wild boar, the name is taken. 

''One oi the Protestant branches 'of the Richebourg 
family lied into South Carolina after the Revocation oi 
the Edict of Nantes, with the descendants of other noble 
houses, viz: Isaac Porcher de Richebourg, doctor of med- 



icine of the University of Paris, who married Claude 
Cherigny, of the province of Touraine, and was the father 
of Joseph Porcher, who left with other issue, a son, Paul 
Porcher, who married Marie du Pic, and was the father 
of Josias du Pre of Charleston, South Carolina, and who 
came with his nude, James du Pre, sometime Governor oi 
Port St. George, Madras, and settled in this countn i I Eng- 
land ) about 'the pear i /< »o." 

Krom this point Burke goes .on to relate the history ol 
this fanuL in Kngland ; who sharing the fate of the 1 rench 
lurchers, have almosi entirely dad out. I he\ are nuv, 
represented only by one descendant, Mr. t yprien Powney, 
0J London, who though married, has no children. 

At the death of his-aunt, Mrs. Porcher, widow of Cap- 
tain Edwin Porcher oi the Royal Xa\\. Mr. Powney was 
to take the name of Porcher, and by this time has prob 
ably ill aie so. 

The only trouble with Mr. Burke's account oi the origin 
of this family is that mi very little ol ii is true. 

I law were not originally Counts, but o,l the bourgeoisie 
of the towns of La ('hare and Sainte-Severe in the prov- 
ince of Perry, many oi them also owning estates in sur- 
rounding country. I hey did uoi come I ruin the Loire, but 
from the ludre, one ol its tributary streams; the Porcher 
de kichebour^ famih was not the ancestral hue, since it had 
it:- origin in the time of -Napoleon, and the title was held 
b\ ouL two n leu, I ailur and m >n 

It was, oi course, impossible for the American branch 
to be descended from them, since the) lived over a hundred 
years after the emigrant., .1 )r. Porcher, was saieh in South 
( Carolina. 

'1 la-re arc other mistakes in Burke's account, such as the 
fact that Hugh Capet was not the founder of the Preneh 
Monarchy, but only of his own dynasty; and it is well 
known that there are several other Porcher families in 
Kngland, though some of them spell their name differently", 
as Dr. Wilson states in his little sketch of Isaac Porcher. 
published in the issue ^\ these Transactions for to to. 



i6 



Instead of this fairy talc "i Ihirke's however, we have 
the true histor) of two men, belonging, a- I believe, to the 
Name race, and who cai.h carved out his own fortune, 
though in very different pan- oi the world. And also, 
each was connected in -cine way with the name oi de 
Kichehourg, though separated l>\ an ocean oi tvater and 
the length of a century. 

Mere we' have a very [jretty little genealogical mystery. 
Hov\ did the Count get his title, and what was the' rela- 
tionship between Isaac Porcher and the Rev. Claude i'lul- 
Hppe de kichehourg, bis friend and pastor? 

I lie first question I can answer, but who knows the 
sect Hid 1 

Monsieur de kichehourg came over from Krauce with a 
party of emigrants hound for \ irginia, where they settled 
at Manakin luwn, oil the bank- ot the fames River, about 
eighteen miles abdve where Richmond now stands. 

There was -non much discussion in this colons, owing, 
it was said, mostly to the coiitnmaciousiiess oj one man. 
hut de kichehourg was of a gentle temperament, and ijuile 
unable to control the situali< m. 

bnialls, part of the congregation decided to break asvas 
entirely, and so they and their pastor and his family- jour- 
neyed South-— heaven knows through how many difficul- 
ties, for a pathless wilderness lav between, until they 
reached the other I "Tench colons in South I'arolina, and 
were welcomed there bs people troni their own old home 
in lYance. 

M. de kichehourg became the pastor of the Huguenot 
Church at Jamestown on the Santee, where he continued, 
greatly loved and respected until his death in 1710"' 

Just bow his name was transferred to Dr. Isaac Porcher, 
we do not know; or whether they were really cousins or 
only neighbors and friends it is impossible to say,* but we 
believe that Burke simply jumped to conclusions and gave 
away a title on very slight authority. 



"From an address by Col. Richard L. Maury before the Hugue 
not Society. 

'• I have nes'er found any authority for relationship.— Editor. 



Dr. Porcher in his will recommends M. tie kichebourg s 

children to his own heirs, as worthy objects of a kindly 
charity, speaking of him as "the late M. de kichebourg/' 
and in no way claiming the name tor himself. 

Dr. Isaac Porcher has often been mentioned in the pages 
of these Transactions^. A lew years ago* a will was pub- 
lished, which proved that the emigrant really was a medical 
doctor, a point which had been uncertain up to thai time. 
The testator referred to him as "Mon Cousin, le Chiru- 
gien.'' Last year nis own will appeared in its turn, in the 
valuable series oi wills of the Huguenot settlers oi South 
Carolina, which this Societ) has been publishing tor a 
number oi years past. 

It was accompanied by a short sketch of his life, written 
by the President () i the Societ)", Dr. Robert Wilson. 

It is only necessary, therefore, to say lure, that all the 
records of the good lloc-tor's life show him lo have been 
a man of both good sense and good feeling. 

Coining pro.babh quite poor to this country, Dr. Porcher 
was able in a short time to acquire both land and goods, 
and, at h<is death, to leave a good nana- and a comfortable 
property to his children. 

We are able to give his origin with positiveness from an 
old manuscript found years ago at Ophir plantation in St. 
Johns, Berkeley, and which runs as follows: 

"Isaac Porcher, no a St'e-Severe en Berry, lils de Isaac 
Porcher el de Susanne Lerre. Isaac, Pierre, b.lizabeth, 
Madeline et Claude, lours enfants." 

I he emigrant's bible which is Mill owned by his descend- 
ants oi the pure Huguenot blood in St. Johns, contains on 
the fly-leaf the following notice of his wife's death, writ- 
ten and signed by himself. 

"Le mm 7Jr ma femme Claude Cherigny native de la 
Roche posay, province de Touraine est decode age de 65 
an et quatre. Apres avoir este ensemble 44 ails et onze 
mois, ayaiit este marie ensemble le neuvieme October 1681. 
Dieu me fais la grace de faire un lin aussi Christienne-qu'il 
a fait. J. Porcher." 

I )ate of Bible 1 707. 



iS 



The edition is quite a handsome one, and is entitled "La 
Sainte Bible, expliquez par les notes par David Martin, 
pasteUr de l'Eglise VVallonne d'Utreijk." 

The above notice is, of course, given with the Doctor's 
own spelling, from which we can only conclude that his 
mind must have been in a very disturbed condition .shice 
he speaks ol his wife as "he" and not "she," hut we know 
people were not as particular about spelling in those days 
as they are utwv. 

It is interesting to notice that in the list ol' his children 
given aho.ve the Joseph E > orcher spoken of as being one of 
\)\\ Porcher's sons is not mentioned. 

As a matter of fact it was their- son Isaac who married 
Jane or Rachel du Pre, and a was* probably their son 
Josias, who went to England; but they were certainly the 
ancestors of the Hampton, Beaufort and linglish branches 
of the family; and also of .those Charleston Porchers now 
represented by the children of the late Dr. K. V. Porcher. 

The Refugee and his wife lived for some time in Lon- 
don, as the fact of the baptism of two of his children being 
recorded there proves; hut we find from an old document 
that he was in Charleston in i()tiy. 

He settled on land not far from Goose Creek, where, in 
the old Huguenot Cemetery, whose site is now owned by 
this Society, his body is believed to have been laid. 

The name of Porcher is a common enough one in France. 
I found it in many part of the country, in Blois, in Paris, 
Chartres and Nivers, for example; but as we know that the 
man in whom we are interested came from Berry, our 
search is narrowed down to the annals of that Province. 

No trace of Dr. Isaac Porcher himself could he found. 
unfortunately, in the records of his native town, though 
they were carefully searched in the hope of finding some- 
thing about him; but his family name occurred frequently 
in the baptismal and marriage registers preserved in the 
Hotel de Ville of Ste Severe, where it was evidently very 
general at one time. 

It is not unlikely that two families of the same name, 



19 



living in the same community would be related; therefore 
1 think we have a right to assume that in making researches 
into the history of the Porchers oi" Berry, we are at the 
same time learning something of the people from whom 
our forefather came, even though it i.-> impossible to trace 
the exact relationship. 

1 mentioned before my good fortune in having met in 
France some of the few remaining descendants of the 
Porcher family in* Merry, in the persons of .Mine. Girerd, 
and her brother, M. l>uvernet, and that 1 had visited them 
both in their respective homes. 

M"". Girerd was kind enough to lend me a very interest- 
ing manuscript written h\ her father, M. Robin Duvernet, 
friend oi M"". Georges Sand, a woman will known in the 
world of letters, and a nephew of the Abbe Porcher de 
Lissauiia) and of his brother Dr. Giles Porcher, later dis- 
tinguished as the Count Porcher de Richebourg. This 
manuscript of M. Robin Duvernet's was entitled "Souve- 
nirs el F.tudes," and was dictated during the latter years 
of hi> life, and while he was blind. 

It contained, among other things, quite a full account 
of his two uncles, the most important members of the 
family in his day; and I was thus able to learn something 
of the history of the man whose name I had held in my 
memory for so many years. 

1 translate as follows : 

"During this time, {n period before the French Revolu- 
tion), a M. Porcher, a resident of the town of Fa Chatre, 
(but whose country seat was the Chateau oi Cote Perdrix, 
near Sainte-Severe), brought up four children. 

The eldest, after studying law, conceived the idea of 
making himself a doctor of medicine. With almost heroic 
determination, for he was past the age for putting himself 
to school, he stttdied at Montpellier, finally going up to 
Paris, where he finished his studies under the celebrated 
Barthes. 

This man called himself Porcher dti Pleix, assuming his 
mother's family name; while his brother was called Porcher 



20 



de Lissaunay, a common practise in that day, as M. Duver- 
net goes on to explain, lie also mentions that his mother 

was a niece of these two men.. 

"The two brothers led very different lives. L)u Pleix at 
first a doctor in La Chatre, was remarkable" among its 

inhabitants, who could not fail to appreciate (render hom- 
age), to a great uprightness joined to a great capacity. 

It was not, however, the canton of ha Chatre which sent 
him (jut from his bourgeois obscurity, hut the canton oi 
Tournon which cast their votes tor him as their represen- 
tative in the Constitutional Convention. Me did not sig- 
nalize himself there except by his vote in the judgment of 
the King, Louis XVI. Me voted for his banishment. 

Under the Directory he was a member of the party 
known as the Five Hundred. After the i8'\ Brumaire, he 
was chosen bv Bonaparte and was one of the new assembly 
soon called the Senate. 

Under the Bourbons he became a member of the heredi- 
tary peerage, in which, at his death, his son succeeded him. 

Al. Porcher du Pleix was concerned in all the great af- 
fairs of his time. 

The Kmperor, who was restoring a nobility, advised him, 
when making him a Count to take a name more in harmony 
with his situation than Porcher, the only one by which he 
was known in the Convention. 

The new Count, therefore, took the name of a small 
property comprised in the estate ^i Lys St. (ieorge I near 
1 .a Chatre), which he had recently bought." 

ft will therefore be seen, that it was through the pur- 
chase oi a small landed estate that the Count acquired his 
new title of de Richebourg. 

Strangely enough, in far off America, the descendants of 
a certain Huguenot emigrant and pastor, o\ that name and 
from that very part of France, were even then living in 
intimacy with those of another emigrant. Mr. Isaac Por*- 
clier ! Maj' it not be possible that by a curious coincidence 
it was the Rev. Claude's own old home that the Count 
bought, thus, at the same time acquiring his name ami title? 






21 



"Monsieur le Cbmte de Richebourg," continues M. Du- 
vernet, "lost his wife very early, and only had one son. 
This inheritor of a good name and a good position quar- 
reled with his father at the age of seventeen, and, leaving 
home, enlisted as a common soldier. lie took all The 
grades of rank on the held of battle, where he was deco- 
rated by the hand of the Ltmperor himself. lie served in 
Portugal, in Germany and in Russia. 1 le married a beau- 
tiful woman, a M n *. Mermon, and left one daughter, who 
married a M. de Bernon. Their son is now the only living 
descendant of the Count Porcher de Richebourg." And 
so with the Count's son the name died out. 

The history of the Abbe Porcher de Lissaunay, a very 
remarkable man who did much good in his day, will be re- 
lated in connection with that of his own old home, the 
Chateau of Cote Perdrix, near Sainte-Severe, the only 
Porcher home in the old world of which we have any 
description. 

M. Charles Duvernet of the Chateau an Coudray, near 
LaChatrc, was kind enough, during my visit to him, not 
only to take me to see the old home of our race, the ancient 
town ni Sainte-Severe, but also to give me a history of 
La Chalre. Ibis is called "L'Histoire de La Chatre, on 
une petite Ville qui n'a pas tine Histoire," and is by M. 
Charles 1 Hignet. 

1 have since obtained from its published another book 
about the same region of country, entitled "L'Histoire de 
Sainte-Severe en Herry," which i.^ by M. Kniilc Chenon. 
This is as stirring and peaceful, though the two towns are 
only nine miles apart. 

From these two books we can learn much, not only about 
the country from which our emigrant forefather was driven 
by religious persecution, but also get some idea of the 
position of the family from which he came. 

But, beside this merely personal interest their perusal 
will also give us a very clear idea of the conditions which 
existed all over France in the days before the great revolu- 
tion, which so completely changed the course of her history. 



The abuses which so deeply affected the lives ol the 
inhabitants of Berry; feudal and seigneurial rights; absent 

landlords, very present bailii's, and all too numerous officials 
of all sorts, with the oppressive taxation to which all the 
people who cultivated the soil were subjected, were- those 
which caused the downfall of the old regime all over 
France. 

The towns of Sainte-Se.vere and La Chatre are like two 
jewels strung on one ribbon. Nine miles apart, they are 
nevertheless connected by the River Indre after a very 
charming fashion all its own. This is a most picturesque, 
winding little stream, on whose hanks stands many a lovely 
old Chateau, renowned, probably, once in ancient warfare, 
but now sleeping in a peaceful .solitude. The whole 
country has been described again and again in the works 
of iM'" e . Georges Sand, herself a native of Berry, of whose 
celebrity its inhabitants are not a little proud. 

ller Chateau de Nohant, where she received most the 
noted people of her day, is situated on the main road be- 
tween La Chat re and Ste- Severe. There, in the summer 
evenings, under the two willow trees in her garden, which 
are still standing, she received her guests. In the winter 
princes and nobility of all sorts were proud to take part in 
the theatrical performances which she frequently gave in 
her private theatre, to test for herself the results of her 
dramatic works. There was the warmest friendship be- 
tween her and M. Robin Ihivernet. who lived not far away 
at the Chateau an Coudrav, a lovely spot which overlooks 
the. valley of the Indre. 

When impoverished for the moment, by lavish hospital- 
ity which she exercised she would write over to him — 
"My friend, lend me some money, 1 haven't a sou." 

It was after dining with M. Duvernet that her father, 
M. Dudevaht was thrown- from his horse and killed. Per- 
haps he had been dining not wisel) but too well. 

But, all this has nothing to do with the story we have 
in hand. 

In the history of La Chatre, or which 1 have spoken, 



the name of Porcher occurs very frequently, a^ that of one 
of the prominent families of the town and its neighborhood. 

They have a custom in I* ranee of designating the dif- 
ferent branches of a family by the names of their country 
seats; as we should say "Porcher of Ophir, Porcher of 
Mexico," etc. In a list of the bourgeois families of La 
Chatre (which word Al. Dugnel takes occasion to explain 
originally meant only the inhabitants of a town orlxnirg- — 
coming to' mean, people of the "Tiers-Etats" or what is 
known as the middle classes), among these people in La 
Chatre, he says, many such titles are found for the Por- 
chers, showing how numerous they had once been in that 
community; — as, for instance, Porcher de la borest, des 
Guinards, de \ illebors, de Labreuil, and de Lissaunay. 

Their names are also frequently mentioned in connection 
with the town elections and, therefore, as a family they 
must have taken an active part in whatever concerned the 
community in which they lived. 

The most distinguished of these families was undoubtedly 
that of Porcher de Lissaunay, and consequently it is the 
only one of whom any definite history has come down to 
us, — the rest are only names. 

For several generations the Presidency of the Bureau 
of the Salt (a government office, and one which carried 
with it a certain dignity and position), was held in this 
family, descending from father to son, until it was abolished 
in the time of the great "revolution. 

To quote from M. Dugnet: "During the entire length 
of the eighteenth century we find almost constantly this 
position occupied by the family of Porcher de Lissaunay. 
Francois Porcher tie Lissaunay, President of the Bureau 
of the salt in 1700, married his daughter, Marie Anne to 
Philippe Rene Porcher de Yillecture, Sieur ties Guinards, 
and left his office as president to his son, Francpise II. who 
married in 1744, Ursule tie Baucheron clu Pleix, and died 
in 1766, leaving two sons, the one Philippe Alexander Por- 
cher de Lissauny, Doctor of Theology, Canon, Vicar, then 
Curate of La Chatre after the Revolution, author ni a 



24 



history of Vaiidouan; who died in [826. I lis eldest son, 
Giles Porcher, at first took his mother's name of du Pleix, 

was for a long- time President of the Bureau o\ the Salt, 
and became Count Porcher de Richebourg, and peer of 
France, lie married M"". Robin de la Ronde, and died 
in 1825. 

We find also among- the Presidents of the Bureau of the 
Salt, Maitre Jean Porcher de la Forest, who was at the 
same time Officer de F Election, a double employment which 
was common 'enough at that time." 

Finally M. Dngnet cannot help but make a little moan 
over the disappearance, of this as well as other names once 
so numerous in the community, lie says: "From, century 
to century certain names disappear. Where today are the 
Sellerons, the Patauds, the Porchers? On reading the old 
records, one feels a vague sadness, at seeing thus ex- 
tinguished not only individuals but whole families as well. 
In every generation the fruit falls from the genealogical 
tree. 'This is according to rule; hut, it seems to me, that 
death is more profound when it strikes the last males of a 
family,, for then it is the tree itself which ceases to Live." 

What a pity that the man could not have known, that 
for one of these families at least, the wind of destiny had 
wafted a strong shoot to far off shores, where it had taken 
root, llonrished, and grown into a strong tree, with life in 
it to last for many a long year yet! Mow warmed and 
interested his antiquarian soul would have been! 

The other book to which 1 have referred, M. Chenon's 
monumental work, the history of Ste. Severe, which sets 
forth on its title page that it had been crowned by the 
"Academic des Beaux Arts," ami at the "Concours des An- 
tiquites Rationales," had received honorable mention, 
though very long and minute, is not, as one might suppose 
dull reading. On the contrary there are many pages in it 
of thrilling interest, especially for those who love France, 
and are interested in her history. 

M. Chenon had free access to the family archives which 
for centuries had been carefully preserved in the muniment 



room of the Chateau above the town, which has always 
been the home of the Lords of Ste. Severe. 

He was therefore able to trace with minute care the 
history of the town and its rulers, describing faithfully the 
lives of the people, and the chants in the course of events 
and conditions from the earliest times, but over most of 
this, of course, we must pass very lightly; however, it is 
interesting I think to find an account in his pages of the 
very raid, which in all probability drove our emigrant forth 
from his home, giving us our French-American ancestor. 

"The little town of Sainte-Severe en Berry, or Sainte- 
Severe sur 1'1'ndre, says M. Chenon, is situated in one of 
the most picturesque parts of Lower Berry, on the fron- 
tiers of the Marche Limousine, about ten kilometers from 
the source of the Indre. It is built entirely on the right 
bank of the river, at an elevation of about three hundred 
meters, on a steep ridge, which comes np abruptly from 
the river's bank. 

"At its highest point rise the ruins of the ancient ("ba- 
teau, of which only the tower is left; while not far off is 
the new Chateau, where the present Lords of the town now 
live, as their ancestors have done before them for genera- 
tions. This new building is a very handsome one, and 
was built shortly before the Revolution. 

"The name of the place is taken from that of a Merovin- 
gian Abbess, Severe as she was called, who flourished in 
the y 1 " century s and who about the year b^o, visited the 
site of the present town, bringing with her a number of 
nuns. There, at the foot of the hill, they built their con- 
vent, and established their residence. 

"The inhabitants of the little town conceived such a 
veneration and affection for her that they gave their town 
her name. 

"Long- after her death at Treves, her bones were brought 
back to the town on the indre, and there enclosed in the 
parish Church, and practically worshiped ever since. 

"During the Revolution, when there was danger of their 
profanation by the mob, they were removed at night by a 



26 

faithful woman of the congregation and her husband, who 
hid them in a secret place in her house for three years. 

"After that terrible period was over, the relics were 
brought out, carefully examined by the priests, wrapped in 

fresh linen cloths and sealed. They were then placed in 
a handsome, new reliquary and reconsecrated by an impos- 
ing ceremony. 

"In recent times a fine new Church has been built in their 
honour, and there the bones of the good saint, dead many 
hundred years age, are worshiped daily. 

"The town of Sainte-Severe has from the very earliest 
times been the seat of a barony, which, during" the course 
of the centuries, has passed into main' hands, and experi- 
enced a very varied history." 

[f we only had time to linger many interesting things 
could be told about them, for M. Chenon goes deeply into 
their history, under many fascinating titles; as, for instance 
"Les A ventures de Marguerite de Malevale, et les (Exploits 
de 1 luguet de Chamborant." 

We have often heard vaguely of the Revocation of the 
Edict of Nantes; perhaps it may interest some t<» know 
just what it meant, and what it "revoked." 

In 1 5<jX, Henry IV . having from motives of policy de- 
clared himself a Roman Catholic, but Mill wishing to help 
those among his people who belonged to his old religion, 
granted to the Protestants in his dominions a certain 
amount of religious and personal freedom to which they 
had long been strangers. 

Whereas, before they were not allowed lo held their 
meetings for the worship of Cod in any tow ns, but had to 
seek fields and other out of the way spots, they were now 
allowed to come together openly in the town in which their 
religion prevailed. 

They were still obliged to pay a certain regular tithe for 
the support of the Roman Catholic clergy, but could in ad- 
dition to this raise enough money to support their own 
ministry; and they could also hold property, ami educate 
their children in their own way. 



These privileges were taken away from them gradually 
and from time to time, but they enjoyed comparative peace, 

until the middle age of Louis XIV, when Madame de 
iVlaintenon and his lather confessor, La Chaise, having 
gotten entire influence over his mind, persuaded him to 
enter into a campaign for the utter extermination of protec- 
tants. 

So many nobles about the Court had recanted that the 
excuse can be made for the King that he thought there 
would be no difficulty in destroying this "pestilent sect," 
completely. 

In an Edict, therefore, dated the 2 1 " 1 . October, 1685, he 
declared that his "Grandsire of glorious memory," King 
Henry IV. had extended certain privileges to the members 
of the pretended reformed religion, which he, King Louis, 
in view of the fact that the greater part of his subjects of 
the said pretended reformed religion had already embraced 
the Catholic faith and therefore the above mentioned priv- 
leges had become useless, he thought it wisest to revoke 
them entirely, and everything since done in favor of the 
.said religion. 

After this revocation, and in spite of their supposed pre- 
vious conversion, it is estimated that over fifty thousand 
Huguenot families escaped from France* to the great loss 
of that Kingdom, but to the lasting good of those lands to 
which they went. 

They were generally of the middle class, and were em- 
phatically the courageous and sober minded, the moral, in- 
dustrious and thinking, as well as the pious part of the 
community. It is impossible to tell how completely dif- 
ferent the later course of French history might have been, 
if the descendants of these Huguenot heroes had been still 
in Prance. 

One favorite and much practised mode oi "conversion" 
used by the "good King Louis" were the Dragonnades oi 
infamous memory. 

It it was not that we have the most undoubted testimony 
on the subject, it would be impossible to believe that such 



>8 



horrors could be perpetrated under the mask of the ( liris- 

tiau religion. 

In a memoir, written by Mr. James Fontaine, and edited 
by his descendant, Miss Ann Aktury, the following descrip- 
tion of these dragonnades is given. Unfortunately for 
himself Mr. Fontaine had been both a witness and a 
victim of their brutalities. 

"A day was appointed for the conversion of a certain 
district, and the dragoons made their appearance accord- 
ingly. They took possession of the houses of the Protest- 
ant inhabitants of the place, destroyed all they could not 
consume or carry away; turned their parlors into stables 
for their horses; treated the owners of the houses with 
every species of cruelty; depriving them of food; beating 
them; burning some alive, half roasting others and then 
letting them go; tying mothers securely to posts, then leas- 
ing their suckling infants to perish al their feet; hanging 
some upon hooks in the chimneys and smoking them with 
wisps oi wet straw until they suffocated; some they clipped 
in wells; others they bound down and poured wine into 
them until reason was destroyed; and many other torture- 
were inflicted even more horrible than the above named." 

From "A Huguenot Family," by lames Fontaine, edited 
by Ann Maury. 

According to our author, A I. Chenon, Sainte-Severe did 
not escape her share oi these terrible persecutions, though 
they do not seem to have been so cruel as in other places. 

lie writes; "During this period ( hh^-ijoi | there took 
place at Sainte-Severe the application of the Fdicl oi the 
2nd October, 1685, by which Louis \1V. revoked the Fdicl 
oi Nantes of 1698. This Fdict of Revocation had already 
been carried out in other parts of Berry by the zeal of the 
lntendent of Bourgis, Louis Francois Dey de Serancourt. 
There were in this province about five thousand Protes- 
tants. Some lived in or near Sainte-Severe. In k>oo the 
town was visited by the soldiery under de Serancourt. and 
the Protestant Temple was destroyed. A cross was erected 
on its site, to efface, said the Cure Jacquinet, "the memory 



2 9 



of the injury done to the true religion of Jesus Christ on 
this spot." This cross can still be seen on the summit of 

a hill, not far from the town, a silent witness of the cruel- 
tie of a past age. 

But Dr. Jsaae Porcher did not wait for this final calam- 
ity. Apparently as soon as possible after the Revocation 
of the Edict, which had secured some personal liberty, he 
had made his way to England with his newly married wife, 
and from thence to America. Imagine, if you please,, what 
this journey meant to a provincial Krehehman in those 
days; the French being most especially a home loving folk. 

Perhaps Isaac Porcher was considered and eccentric and 
misguided member of his family, for all of them certainly, 
did not choose to suiter for a new religion. 

In 1695, ten years exactl) after the flight of our emi- 
grant, we hud the largest farm (terre, they called it 1 he- 
longing to the Baron of Sainte-Severe; rented by a certain 
Samuel Porcher, for 1.350 livers, an immense sum at that 
time. 

dims did the family fortunes wax and wane. Those in 
the new world prospered and spread over the land, while 
those in the old gradually shrank, until the name died out 
entirely about the middle of the iS"' century. 

As J said before, the last family o\ the name in Berry, 
of which we have any record is that of Porcher de Lissau- 
nay. They owned a Chateau, called the Chateau de Cole- 
Perdrix, not very far from Sainte-Severe, of which M. 
Chenon gives an interesting description. As this is the only 
known of the Porchers in the old world, and as it describes 
a mediaeval fortress, a description of it ma\ interest some 
of my readers. 

"On descending the river lndre, on the right bank, one 
will bud the ruins of the Chateau de Cote-Perdrix. fn 
1701 this was bought by Francois Porcher de Lissaunay, 
from its previous owners, Pierre Dorsanne de Mont lex ie 
and Dame Franchise Millier, his wife. 

This lief then comprised tour parts. The Chateau itself 
was an immense mass of buildings, and beyond it was the 



mill. There was also the large farm house, and diverse 
out-buildings. 

The Chateau had, speaking broadly, a rectangular form, 
and was composed of a number oj chambers, constructed 
to the west, along the bank of the river. It included ;i 
room on the ground Lloor, a large kitchen above, two bed 
chambers on the third floor, and a garret surmounting 
them all. ' 

2nd. A high tower of four stories was at the south wesi 
corner, joining the kitchen, and facing the big yard. 

3rd. At the east was the gateway, and oyer it the chapel, 
with yet another story above that. 

4th. At the north, and beyond the gateway, stood the 
principal dwelling house. 

All was surrounded hv walls, and in the middle ol the 
court enclosed by this mass of buildings, was the well, all 
important in case oi a siege. 

Mere lived for years this branch of the Porcher family, 
excepting when they were performing carious civic duties 
in La Chatre and elsewhere, and to this place the Abbe 
Porcher de Lkssaunay, brother of the Count Porcher de 
Richebottrg returned as a poor emigre from Switzerland. 
after the Lrench Revolution, to find it in ruins. 

Not disheartened he took up the life of a simple village 
Cure, leaving his mark -on his world, where his memory is 
fragrant to this day. 

I ul ki Porcher W'ickham. 



"La Reforme dans L'lle D'Oleron, Par Paul Thomas, 
Capaeitaire en Droit. Ouvrageorne de onze illustrations. 
Lc/.ay Imprimerie- Librairie II. (anon, 1911." pp. 121. 
Paper. 

The thanks of. the Society are due the author oi this 
valuable historical contribution to Huguenot literature for 
a copy of his book. It is to be regretted that the volume 
arrived too late for a more extended review in this issue 



3i 



of the Transactions, but even a cursor) reading suggests 
its special interest and value to our membership. A glance 
at the excellent and complete index shows a large nuinlxT 
of names represented in our ancestral list. Ah long these 
occur Allard, d'Aubigne, Bacot, Belin, Benoist, Boisseau, 
Bouyer, Carriere, Conde, Cormier, Coutan, ^Hibois, Du 
l'n\', Fresneajti, Gaillarde, Gamier, Gibert, Clras, Guignard, 
de La Fontaine, Leval, LeComte, DeMercier, Martin 
Moreau, La Mothe, Petit, Prioleau (Samuel), kaoul, Rob- 
ert, Seguin, Tessier, Thomas, and others of local interest. 

The illustrations are also of great interest, showing por- 
traits of distinguished Huguenots, local views of the Lie 
of ( Heron and others giving an excellent ideaot the archi- 
testure and costumes of the time. The Isle oi (Heron was 
among the earliest seed-beds of the Reformation in France 
and the scene oi the bitterest persecutions. 

The hook may he obtained from the author, Al. Paul 
Thomas, Le Chateau, He D'Oleron, Charente Inferieure, 
France, at the modest cost of 3 francs, 65 centimes 71 
cents U. S. currency. 

Another donation to the Society which is hereby grate- 
fully acknowledged, i^ I he Alonnelte Family Genealogy," 
by Orra L. Monnette, attorney and counsellor at law, Los 
Angeles, Cal. This is a large and handsomely printed 81110. 
well illustrated and exhibiting throughout evidences of 
hard and- judicious work in genealogical research. The 
hook will be oi very great value to the descendants oi the 
Monnette Family, not only in direct line but through the 
large number of families of different names descended in 
the female lines from intermarriage with the Monnettes. 
These have been carefully investigated by the painstaking 
author and their pedigrees in most cases worked out. This 
feature will also commend the volume to professional gen- 
ealogists and others interested in family researches. 
The price of the volume may appear large, but to those 
accustomed to book making it will be evident at once that 
the cost of issuing must have very far exceeded this .sum. 
For sale l>v the author as above. 



LIST OF MEMBERS 



APRIL. 10.11. 

Members will please inform the Secretary of all changes of residence 
or address, to insure receipt of Transactions. 



The names in italics at the end of each entry arc those of the 
original Huguenot families from which the member derives descent 

* This 'mark indicates a Charier Member. Names in small capitals 
are Honorary Members. Names in large capitals are Huguenots of the 
pure blood after two and a quarter centuries. 

r. Resigned. 

d. Dead. 

/. m. Life member. 

April 19, 1911.. Alexander, Mrs. lilliel Witherspoon, Boston, Mass 

Trabue and I errcisil. 
April 13, 1910.. Alexander, Mary E. Richardson, Sumter, S. C 

May runt . 
April 19, 1911.. Allan, Mrs. Kathrine Bostick, East Orange, N. J 

Robert. 

April 2, 1885. .Alleman* Frances, H., d Legari. 

April 13, 1885. . Allston,* Rev. Benjamin, d Gibert. 

April 2, 1901. .Allston, Clias, P., Georgetown, S. C Gibert. 

May 28, 1897. .Alston, Miss Rebecca II ., Charleston, S. C, d..Motte, 

LaBrosse. 
April 22, 1908.. Ames, Mrs. Mary Boykin, Baltimore, Md 

Lei hevalier, de la Plaine. 
April 20, 1906. .Anderson, Claudia Bennett, Charleston, S. C, 

Simons, DuPre. 
April 19, 191 1 . .Armstrong, Mrs. Josephine Greshani, Galveston. 

Texas Pickens. 

April 17, 1902..Aymar, Mrs. Jane V. H.. Jersey City, N. J Si mons, 

LeSerurier, Gignilliat, DuPre, 

Leger, Du Bliss. 
April 13, 1885..Bacot* Daniel linger, Charleston, S. C ,Baeot. 

linger, DeSaussure, Motte, Pe- 

ronneau. 
April 14, 1886..Bacot, John Vacher, Jersey City, N. J i.Bacot, 

Vaeher, DeSaussure, Peronneau. 



33 

April 13, 1885. . Bacot*, Julius Motte, d ....bacot, lluger, DcSaussure, 

Peronncau, Motte. 
April 13, 1885. .Bacot*, Maria Fraser, d Bacot, DeSaussure, 

Peronneau. 
April 14, 1886.. Bacot, Robert Cochran, d Bacot, DeSaussure, 

Peronneau. 
April 13, 1885. .Bacot*, Robert Dewar, Charleston, S. C, d 

Bacot, DcSaussure, Peronncau. 

April 13, 1910.. Bacot, R. Dewar, Charleston, S. C Bacot 

April 13, 1885.. Bacot*. Thomas Wright, Charleston, S. C Bacot, 

t linger, DcSaussure, M enessier, 

Peronncau, Matte, Daleu. 

April 13, 1904.. Bacot, Jules DeR., Savannah, Ga Bacot. 

April 13, 1899.. Bacot, Mrs. Thomas Wright, Charleston, S. C 

DeBerniere. 

April 13, 1904. .Bacot, Samuel Holloway, d Bo cot. 

April 5, 1909.. Ball, Mrs. Elias, Charleston, S. C. (Mary Wilson 

Ball) Maz$ck, Ravenel, Le 

Noble, dc St. Julicn, LcScruricr. 
M'ch 31, 1890. .Barker, Theodore G., Charleston, S. C Cordcs, 

Gendroii, Serve, Gaillard. 

April 13, 1905.. Barr, Mrs. Mary McDonald Macon. 

April 18, 1909. .Bassett, Mrs. Caroline DuPuy, Winslow, Mo.. .DuPuy 

La I'illain, La Pradc. 

April 14, 1890. . Bayard, Hon. Thomas R, d Bayard. 

April 17, 1902. . Beckman, Julia Reese, Charleston, S. C Cms. 

April 13, 1885. . Beckman*, Serena B., Charleston, S. C Gras. 

April 13, 1910. .Beckwith, Mrs. Videau Marie Legare, Charleston, S. C. 

Legate. 

April 20, 1906. .Belcher, Mrs. A. F. C Macon. 

April 17, 1902. .Bennett, Mrs. John M., San Antonio, Texas .. 

Bonneau, DuBliss, de Longue- 

)iui»e, Rot. 
April 19, 19.11. . Berryman, Mrs. Charlotte Cazenove, Alexandria, Va... 

de Cazenove. 
April 15, 1909. .Black, Miss Emma C, Charleston. S. C. .DeLesleiue. 

M'ch 8, 1895..Blackshear, Mrs., Macon, Ga GignilUat. 

April 14, 1890.. Blackmail, Mrs. E. L., Greenville. S. C Robert. 

Oct. 12, 1898..Bondurant, Dr. E. D., Mobile, Ala DuBose. 

April 2, 1890. .Bonneau, F. N., Charleston, S. C Bonneau. 

April 2, 1890. .Bonneau, W. E., Charleston, S. C Bonneau. 

April 14, 1890. .Bostick, A. McO., Bamberg, S. C, d Robert. 

April 19, l911..Boatiek, Benjiihan Robert, New York City. N. V 

Robert. 

April 17, 1902. .Bounetheau, Harold Dul're, New York DuPre. 

Bounctheau 



34 



July 14, 1896. .Bounetheau, Henry 1). d Bounetheau 

June 25, 1894. . Bowley, Mrs. J. V. G.. Jerscj City, \\ J /;///'> . ; , 

LeSerur.ier, Leger, Gignilliat, 

DuBliss. l/eyward. 
April .13* 1905. .Bowley, E. Hey ward..'. .DuPre, LeSerurier, Leger, 

Gignilliat, DuBlis* 

April 2, 1885. . Box*, Rosa, Charleston, S C, r Gaillard. 

April 13, 1885. .Boykin*, Sarah J., Camden, S. C, d DeSaussure. 

Nov. 4, 1899. .Bracey, Jean Charlemagne, editor Huguenot Quar- 
terly, Poughkeepsie, N. V 

Bracey, 

April 15, .1907. .Bragonier, Fred. Tyler, Globe, Arizona Peconier. 

April 20, 1906.. Brent, George A„ Louisville, Ky Mouse. 

April 17, 1902;. Broun, Fontaine, Charleston, YV. Va Boursequot, 

Fontaine. 
April 14, 1886.. Broun, Mrs. Mary M., Charleston, VV. Va.. d 

Boursequot, Fontaine. 
April 14, 1886. . Broun, Thomas L., Charleston, VV. Va.. . .Boursequot. 

Broun. 

July 2, 1903. .Brown, Dr. Paul R., d . . • Richard, de Bruyn. 

June 11, 1898. .Brunson, If. A., Florence, S. C Bacot 

June 11, 1898.. Brunson, \\. M., Florence, S. C Bacot 

April 20, 1906. .Brunson, Mrs. Mary Motle, Florence, S. C Bacot, 

Foissin. 

April 13, 1905. Bryan, Miss Mary Bacot Bacot. 

April 13, 1905.. Bryan, Mrs. Mary Mclver, Tuscaloosa, Ala Bacot. 

April 22, 1908.. Bryce, Mrs KUen I'eter, Tuscaloosa, Ala Uony, 

l.aRoche, Simons, DuPre. 

April 14, 1890..Buist, Dr. J. Somers, Charleston, S. C. (/ Leyare. 

M'eh 21, 1903.. Bulloch, Dr. Joseph G„ Washington, D C 

Del caux, Mauve. 

April 2, 1885. Burdeil* Alice M., Charleston, S. C Marion. 

Apiil 13, 1901 .Burdeil, Ed-win 1\, Savannah, Ga Marion, 

Ravenel, Mac y\ k. 

April 2, 1885. . Burdeil*, F. M., d • Marion. 

April 14, 1885. . Burdeil* Robert F., d . Marion. 

April 2, 1885. .Burdeil*, Thad. S., d Marion. 

April 2'\ 1906. Burnhani, Edith E., Charleston, S. C Gras. 

April 2, 1901. .Burton, Robert K., Auburn, Ala ..Robert. 

April 19, 1911. .Butler, Jessie, Georgetown, S. C Bacot. 

April 19, 1911.. Butler, LeRoy II., Georgetown, S. C Bacot 

April 13, 1904. . Butler, Mrs. Jessie T Bacot, Foissin. 

April, 1909. .Butler, Miss Louise Screven, l.os Angeles, Cal 

Robert. 

April 13, 1885 . .Caldwell*, Wm. Robinson, d '.Thomas. 

April 13, 1885. .Campbell*, Miss Celia, d Sigourney, Ger- 

maine, Pairan, Simons, DuPre. 



35 



13£67G0 



April 13, 1885. .Campbell*, Mary Bennett, Charleston, S. C, d..Sigour 

tiey, Gertnaine, Pairan, DuPrS. 

April 13, 1885. .Campbell*, Mary Butler, d Sigaurney, Pairan. 

April 19, 1911..Cappeal, Mrs. Waldine V., Galveston, Texas.. Mathews. 

April 13, 1885. .Car re re*, Mrs. Elizabeth Calhoun, d Segur 

April 13, 1903.. Charles, Robert K., d DuBose. 

April 12, 1899.. Chase, John A., Florence, S. C Bacot. 

April 13, 1903.. Che ves, Mrs. C. McCord, Charleston, S. C.Turquand. 
April 10, 1890. .Chisolm, Dr. J. Bachman, Charleston, S. C... Gendron, 

Prioleau. 
April 11, 1890. . Chisolm, Henry Louis, Charleston, S. C, d. . .Gendron, 

Prioleau. 
April 13. 1905.. Clarke, James W.. Utica, N. V LeGrand. Roberts. 

Bocquet. 
April 21, 1900.. Clark, Mrs. J. Calhoun, Atlanta, (ia Brauyi, 

Jaudon, LeGrand. 
April 19, 1911 . .Thompson, Thomas Clarkson, Chattanooga, Tenn 

I lorry. 
April 13, 1903. .Clarkson, Heriot, Charlotte, N. C. Simons, Horry, 

LaRoche, DnPre, Marion. 
April 13, 1903. .Clearwater, Hon. Alphonso T., Liu Baudoin, 

B rid urn, Corquct, Doian, (Peyo), 

\iiol. Sequine, Vernooye. 
April 13, 1888. . Clement, J. \V. Legare, Young's Island, S. C. .Legate. 
April 13, 1905. .Colcbck, Charles Jones, Charleston, S. C Marion. 

Baluet. 
April 13, 1901 . .Colcoek, Dan. DeS., Charleston. S. C Bacot, 

DeSaussure. 

April 15, 1907.. Cole, Miss Edith G., Alleghany, Pa Jaquett. 

April 13, 1904.. Collins, Mrs. Lucy G., Charleston, \V. Va Horry. 

April 13, 1901. .Connerat, William 11. , Jr., Savannah, Ga .Robert. 

April 1 ( ', 1911. .Connor, Mrs. Charlotte C. Hall, lirooklyn, X. V..... 

LeSeunier, /.*'</«*' • Vrecez'ant, 

Maulardj Puyas, Gendron, Mo 

syek. 

April 20, 1906.. Cooper, W. B., Wilmington, N. C Jeanerette. 

April 13, 19(14.. Cooper, Noah \\ . Nashville, Tenn., r feancrette 

April 15, 1907.. Cole, Charles L., Alleghany, IVnn., l.m faquett. 

April 18, 1909. .Cordes, Alexander Watson, Sr., Charleston, S. C 

Cordes. 

April 13, 1885. .Coste* A. L., d Caste. 

April 13, 1885.. Coste*. R. C, Charleston, S. C Coste. 

Get. 29, 18C9. .Coutant, Dr. Richard B., Tarrytown, N. V. . . . Coutaut 
April 17, 1902. .Cummings, Mrs. Rosa W., Charleston, S. C.Bouife- 

theau, Legare. 
April 13, 1905. .Cunningham, Miss Sarah.. Gibert. 



36 



April 13, 1910..Guthbert, Mrs Eloise Watics Mayrant, Sumter, S. C, 

Mayrant, Guiynard DeLeiseline, 
Gaillardj Vaparel, Le Seruner. 

April 13, 1885. .Cuttino* David B., Rock Mill, S. C Cothoneau. 

April 19, 1911. .Cuttino, John S.. Columbia. S. C Kaihouneau. 

April 13, 1910. .Davant, C. F., Tucson, Arizona Davant. 

April 2, 1885.. Davant, j. C, Barnwell, S. C Daiwi/. 

M'ch 21, 1890. .Dawson, N. 11. R., d linger. 

April 13, lS10..Dela ! plaine, Louis S., Wheeling, W. Va . .</* la Plaine. 

April 7, 1890. *DeRosset, A. T., r DeRosset. 

April 7, 1890. . DeRosset, Win., r DeRosset. 

April 18, 1.885.. DeSaussure, Fannie E., Charleston, S. C, d ..DeSaus- 



Apnl 2, 1885 



April 


; 


1885 


April 


) 


1885 


April 


) 


18,85 


April 


H, 


1890 


April 


> 


1885 


April 


13, 


1885 


April 


13, 


1885 



April 2, 1885 



April 2, 1885. 



April 


2, 1885 


April 


2, 1885 


April 


13, 1885 



April 2, 1885. 



April 


9 


1885 


April 


i3, 


1903 


April 


) 


1885 


April 
Jul> 


12. 


1885 
1807 


July 


12, 


1897 


Feb. 


; 


1887 


April 


15, 


1907 


April 
April 


15, 
13, 


1907 
1905 



.DeSaussure*, llenrv A, Charleston, S. C, d 

/ h'Saussure, Gourdlu. 

.DeSaussure*. Dr. Henry IV., d DeSaussure. 

.DeSaussure*, Dr. Henry \V , Jr., d DeSaussure. 

..DeSaussure*, Isabel A., Charleston, S. C DeSausr 

sure, Gourdin. 
.DeSaussure, James 1'., d . ... .DeSaussure, Peronneau. 

. DeSaussure *, John P> DeSaussure, Gourdin. 

.DeSaussure*, Louis D., d DeSaussure. 

.DeSaussure", Louis D., Jr., New York, N. Y., d .... 

DeSaussure. 
.DeSaussure*, Mrs. Martha ( ... Charleston, S. C 

Gourdin. 
.DeSaussure*, Martha C, Charleston, S. C (/ 

Gaurdin. 
.DeSaussure*, Martha (]., d ....DeSaussure, Gourdin. 

. DeSaussure*, Mar)- C, d • Peronneau. 

.DeSaussure*, Mr-. Sarah F. Charleston, S. C 

/ >i Saussui t . 
.DeSaussure*, Sarah 1"., Lharle-tun, S. C, d 

/ DeSaussure, Gourdin. 

.DeSaussure*, P. G., d Gourdin, DeSaussure. 

.DeSaussure, William 1',. Richmond, Va. ..DeSaussure. 

.DeSaussure*, Wilmot G., (/ DeSaussure. 

.DeSaussure' 1 , Wilmot G., Jr., r . .DeSaussure. Gourdin. 
DkRi'itiemoni), Louis IVIksihjnkt, Archivisie tie La 

Rochelle, France. 

.DeVeaux, Henri, Bordeaux-, France DeVeaux. 

.Dibble, Samuel, Orangeburg, S. C Gabeau. 

. Doar, David, Santee, S. C Cordes. 

.Doar, Mrs. Ulric Huguenin, Lakeland, Fla Cordes. 

.Dabney, Mrs. E. B., Vicksburg, Miss Huguenin, 

, Robert. 



37 

May 4, 1897. .DuBose, Miss Mary P., Monteagle, Tenn. ..DuBose. 

Peronneau. 
April 22, 1897.. DuBose, Robert M., Sewanee, Tenn DuBose, 

Port her. 
May 14, 1897. .DuBose, Rev. \V. Haskell, Monteagle, Tenn 

DuBose, Peronneau, Porcher 
April 22, 1897. .DuBose, Rev. W. P., D. IX, Sewanee, Tenn.. .DuBose, 

Porcher. 
May 4, 1897. .DuBose, Miss Susan P., Monteagle, IVim DuBose. 

Peronneau, Porcher. 

April 15, 1907.. DuBose, Miss Willie S., Savannah, Ga DuBose. 

April 22, 1908. .DuBose, Miss Louisa, Alliens. Ga DuBose. 

April 13, 1885.. Due*, Miss P. M., Charleston, S. C, /. m Auber. 

Nov. 15, 1897. .Dunbar, Mrs. J. R„ Ellenton, S. C Het, Gendroh, 

Chardon, Matte, Prioleau. 
April 13, 1910. .Duncan, Mrs. Eddie House, Houston, Tex.. .Legate, 

De la Haute. 

April 13, 1894.. Dunkin, W. 11., Charleston, S. C Huger 

April 13, 1902.. DuPre, Belin Clarke, Columbia, S. C....Belin, DuPre 

May 24, 1898. . DuPre. Prof. J. F. C, d ,'.... DuPre 

April 13, 1909. .Durant, Mrs. Nannie Miles, Charleston, S. C.Bienie 
April 15, 1907. .Dwight, D. G.,- Charleston, S. C Marion, 

Bill net, Halliard. 

April 15, 1907. .Dwight, Dr. R. Y., Pinopolis, S. C Marion. Baluet, 

April 15, 1907. .Dwight, Henry R Marion, Baluet, Ravenel. De St. 

Julien, Mdz$ck, LeNoble, Le 

Serurier, Porcher. 
June 6, 1899.. Ellis, Frampton E.. Atlanta, Ga llet, Gendron, 

Chardon, Motte, Prioleau. 
Nov. 1, 1897.. Ellis, Mrs. Phoebe P., Atlanta, Ga.. Gendron, 

Chardon, Motte, Prioleau. 

Nov. 1, 1897.. Ellis, Prioleau, Atlanta, Ga Prioleau. 

April 19, 1911.. Ennantrout, Miss Adelaide l.oui>e Washington. 

Reading. 1 Vim de fiarre. 

April 13, 1910.. Evans, Emma Crandall, Sedalla, Mo Bouton. 

April 13, 1894..Faulker, Mrs. M. G., New York, N. V Gaillard. 

April 20, 1906. .Finger, Watson Cordes, Charleston, S. C Cordes. 

April 20, 1906.. Finger, Mrs. C. B. C, Charleston, S. C Cordes. 

M'ch 29, 1889. .Eishburne, Mrs. Helen M., Summerville, S. C 

Marion, Ma:ycL\ 
April 20, 1906. .Eishburne, Miss Caroline D'Arcy, Washington, D. 

C Postell, Pepin. 

April 20, 1906. .Eishburne, Benjamin Postell, Washington, D. C 

Postell, Pepin. 

Aprd 13, 1894. .EitzSimons, W. Huger, Charleston, S. C, r ..Gaillard. 
April 13, 1904.. Farley, Mrs. Sarah C. C. Hutto, Texas. .Bonneau, Roi. 



3» 



Oct. 30, 1885. .Fiudd, Mrs. Eliza K., d Legate 

April 22, 1908. .'Ford, Mrs. Marlon .)., d 

April 13, 1905. .Ford, Mrs. M; A. Lucas, (I' W.), Georgetown. 

S. C. I lorry, linger. 

April IS, 1889. .Foster, Henry P., SummerviUe, S. C, r Poyas 

Gcndron. 

May 30, 1890. .Frost, E. Horry, d LeJau, Huguenin. 

April 13, 1899.. Frost. Frank Ravenel, Charleston, S. C Ravenel, 

LeJau, Huguenin, de St. Julien. 

April 13, 1904. .J<rost, Or. F. LeJau LeJau, Huguenin. 

Aug. 7, 1899. .Frost, Mrs. W. Bran ford, Charleston. S. C linger 

May 30, 1890. .Gaillard, Col. 1). DuBose, Duluth, Minn... Jolaiu, 

LeClair, Gaillard, DuBose, Gen- 
ii run, I hi I net, Boyd; 

April 13, 1910.. Gaillard, David St. Pierre, Culebra, Canal Zone.... 

Gaillard. 

April 21, 1900.. Gaillard, Miss E. G., Charleston, S. C Gaillard. 

May 30, 1890.. Gaillard, Henry I\, St. Augustine, Fla! Gaillard. 

July 12, 1897. .Gaillard, John, Mobile, Ala Gaillard. 

April 2, 1885.. GAILLARD*, P. C, d ....Gaillard, Porcher> 

de Chcriijny, Maayck, LeSerurier 

April 13, 1891. .Gaillard, Miss Rebecca T., Charleston, S. C, d, 

Gaillard. 

April 19, 19.11.. Gaillard, Mrs. Maria Ravenel, Charleston, S: C. 

Ravcnel 

Dec. 1, 1887. .Gaillard, S. Gourdin, New Cumberland, W. Va. 

Gaillard, De Richebonrg, Gour- 
din, Porcher. 

April 13, 1903. Gaillard, Dr. W. Miuot, Georgetown, S. C. . .Gaillard. 

April 13, 1904.. Gaillard, George Caldwell, Mobile, Ala Gaillard. 

April 20, 1906 .Gaillard, Miss Kllinor I*.. Pinopolis, S. C... Gaillard. 

Jut) 1.4, 1897. .Gaillard, Samuel P., Mobile, Ala DcRichebourg 

I'orclu r, Gi'tidroii, Mazy k. 

April 13, 1901. .Gaillard, Win. I).. New York, N. V Gaillard. 

April 2, 1885.. Gaillard*, Win. II. ! >., d Gaillard. 

July 16, 1897.. Gaillard, Win. M., Mobile. Ala Gaillard. 

April 22, 1908... Gait, Mrs. Mary ]., Willianisbunr, Va Servient. 

April 2, 1885. .Gibert*, J!. A., Abbeville, S. t* Gibert. 

April 20, 1906..GignilIiat, L. R Gignilliat, Leger, LeSerurier. 

April 11, 1898. .Gourdin, Mrs. A. B., Charleston, S. C LeGrand 

Jaudon, Brouye, Robert. 

April 2, 1885. .Gourdin*, John K., Charleston, S. C, d Gourdin. 

April 2, 1885. .Gourdin*, R. N.. Charleston, S. C., d Goiudin. 

April 13. 1905.. Greer, Mrs. Mary P., New Castle, Penn., d. .Pi)iusett. 

April'19, 191 1 . .Gresham, Mrs. Josephine Mann, Galveston, Texas 

Pickens. 



39 



April 9, 1890..Grimke, Dr. T. S., Charleston, S. C, d . . . .Faucheraud. 

April 2, 1885..Guerard*, Dr. A. R, Flat Rock, N. C Guerard. 

July 24, 1890. .Guerard, E. P., Charleston, S. C Gaillard, Godin, 

Guerard, Maz$ck\ LeSerurier. 

April 13, 1901. .Guerard, Mrs. E. P. Charleston, S. C Heuezet, 

April 13, 1885. .Guerard*, Wm, Bull, d Guerard. 

April 2, 1901. .Guerard, Win. Elliott, Savannah, Ga. r/ Maz$ck, 

Guerard, LeSerurier, Gudin. 
May 13, 1899. .Guignard, John G., Columbia, S. C Guignard, 

DeLesleine. 
Jan. 30, 1899,. Guignard, Capt. Win. S., West Point, N. V.. .Guignard, 

DeLesleine. 

May 30, 1890. . Guilleteau, Peter L Guilleleau. 

July 12, 1897,.Haig, M. de Lisle, Charleston. S. C rf«? /a Mofte, 

Chastaigner, Mazyck, Buretel 

de St. Jitlieu. LeSerurier. 
April 13. 1902.. Haig, Alary M., Charleston, S. C de la Matte, 

Chastaigner, Maztyck, Buretel, de 

St. Julieu, LeSerurier. 

Oct. 30, 1885.. Hall. Harriet, O., Columbia, S. C, d Huger. 

April 15, 19G7 t .Hamby, Mrs. Elizabeth MeN., Columbia, S. C 

Gaillard, Serre, 

May 1, 1897., Hamilton, J. S., Mobile, Ala Gaillard. 

May 30, 1890. .Harleston, John, Charleston, S. C Huger 

April 13, 1904.. Harrison. Mrs. James Randolph, New York, N. Y. 

Stuyvesaut, Bayard. 

April 13, 1902. .llayne, P. Trapier, Greenville, S. C DiiGui, 

'I rapier. 

April 15, 1909. .Ilillhonse. Rev. J. B., Abbeville, S. C Gibert 

April 14. 1890.. Hill, Mrs. Jane L., Charleston, S. C Gibert, 

April 22, 1908. .Hodgk ins. Mrs. Marie W., Washington, D. C. 

DuPuy, Lelillier. 

April 13, 1910..Holliday, jacuielin Smith, Indianapolis, hid., Jaequelin. 

April 13, 1899. .Holmes, George S, Charleston, S. C i'eronueau. 

April 13, 1899. . Holmes, James G., Charleston, S. C, r ... .I'eronueau. 

April 13, 1885. . Holmes* Rebecca T., d Peronneau. 

April 12, 1890. .Horlheck, Dr. II. 15., d Porcher, de Cherigny. 

April 2, 1908. .Houghton, Mrs. Delia B., Atlanta. Ga Porcher. 

PeClieni/iiy. DuPre. 

June 11, 1896. .linger, Benjamin, Charleston, S. C. r Huger. 

April 2, 1885. .Huger*, C. K. Huger, Charleston. S. C, d linger. 

M'ch 8, 1890. . linger., Francis K., Knoxville, Tenn linger. 

April 13, 1898.. linger. Miss Mary Esther; New Orleans, La.. .Cordes, 

DePeuch, linger 

Sept. 5, 1898. .linger, Mrs. Sabina H., Charleston, S. C linger, 

Cordes. 



40 



April 


13, 


1903 


April 


14, 


1890 


April 


13, 


1885 


April 


12, 


1899 


Feb. 


2, 


1888 


April 


20, 


1906 


April 


20, 


1906 


April 


13, 


1910 


April 


13, 


1903 


April 


13, 


1903 


April 


13, 


1910 


Sept. 


5, 


1898 


April 


21, 


1900 



April 13, 1893, 

Oct. 30, 1885. 
Oct. 30, 1885. 

April 13, 1885. 

April 13, 1885, 

Jan. 17, 1890. 

Oct. 30, 1885. 
April 19, 1911 
April 13, '1902 
April 13, 1904 

April 13, 1905 

April 22, 1908 
Oct. 30, 1885. 
Oct.- 30, 1885. 
April 13, 1902 

April 15, 1909, 
April 22, 1908. 

April 2, 1885. 
April 2, 1885. 



.Huger, Alfred, Charleston, S. C linger 

.linger, Win. E., Charleston, S. C Uuger. 

.linger*, Dr. Win. 11., Charleston, S. C, d ....Uuger. 

.Huguenin, David, Charleston, S. C, r Huguenitt. 

.Huguenin, Inomas A., d Huguenin. 

, Humbird, David, Hudson, Wis. /. m., Humbert. 

.Humbird, James L. Pittsburg, Pa., /. m Humbert. 

.lliirin, Janus II., Los Angeles Gal Trabv.e. 

.Hoyt, Mrs. Rebecca C, Columbia, S. C Gaillard. 

Jloyt, Miss L. K., Camden, S. C Gaillard. 

Jackson, Miss Elizabeth Walker, Bennettsville, S. C, 

Pit, 'all. 

.Jennings, Mrs. William, .Atlanta, Ga., r linger. 

Jervcy, Miss Amaryllis, Charleston, S. C Maz$ck, 

LeSernrier, LeNoble, Ravenel, de 

St. Julia, Postell. 
Jervey, Miss I-:. D,, Charleston, S. C Mazfck, 

LeSernrier, LeNoble, Ravenel, de 

St. Julien, Postell. 

.jervey, Eugene P., Charleston, S. C Postell. 

.Jervey, James I., d \lazyck, Ravenel. De Si. Julien, 

Postell. 
.Jervey 1 , Rene R., d ..Mustek, Ravenel de St. Julien. 

Postell. 
.Jervey*, Wm. St. Jnlien. Charleston, S. C Mustek, 

LeSernrier, Ravenel, de St. Julien. 

LeNoble, Postell. 
.Johnson, Rev. John, 1). 1)., Charleston, S. C, d, 

Bonneau. 

.Johnson, William, d Bonneau. 

Johnson, Mrs. Kannic Carr, Mexico, Mo. . .Perronette. 

.Johnstone, Mis. hanm 1., Mobile, Ala Lesesne. 

Johnstone, Miss Isabel F., Georgetown, S. C de 

Marbenf, DeSaussnre. 
.Johnstone, Miss Emma E., Baltimore, Md.. .deMarbeuf. 

DeSaussure. 

.Jenkins, C. B i s s e 1 1 , Charleston, S. C Gautier. 

.Jones, Ella 11, Charleston, S. C Segur. 

Jones. Miss Lottie M., Charleston, S. C Scgur. 

.Jordan, Mis-, Mary 1).. Chattanooga, Tenn.. r ..Motte, 

linger. 

.Keels, Annie Olivia, Rembert, S. C deRiehel ourg 

.Kendrick, Mrs Julia Lawton, Philadelphia, Pa 

I Robert. 

.Kershaw*, Rev. John, r DuBose. 

.Kershaw* Mrs. Susan D., r ... .DeSaussure. Gourdin. 



Apr:. 

i 

... 
- 

Pre . . 
April 13. 1903 . I . ;n. - . 

■ A . 

i 

April Li. 1904. -Kx 

April : 189 La *>ley. 

. . _ . ... 5 . 

April . . . - 

' ' .... 

-. - 
- ■ 

_ i . 
; . . . 

Apru _-.-•- : . 

- . 

Oct. - ; _ 

April II, l£*Jb..La- St. 

r 

: - 

. . Caihou.. - . 

; - - - - - - ■ 

April • : 

Apr:. - . . _ 

Feb- - !::..: ton L 

- 

22, 1908. .Levris. A. I ... 

April ; = _- - ." . 

April 13. . 3 ..ug. Mrs. LJa M.. C - 5 

Jan. .- Li : ' Palmer 5 J 

. 
April 15. 1907. .Loiiv? Mrs. } -. . . r 

J 



4 



April 13, 1910. .Long, William Ballard, Indianapolis, Ind ...Trabue, 

Daniel, Guerant, Martin, Dabney, 
St ait pin. 

April 13, 1910. .Long, Mrs. Elizabeth Ballard, Indianapolis, Ind 

Dabney, Maupin. 

April 13, 1910. Long, William Dudley, Indianapolis, Ind Trabue, 

Daniel, Guerant, Martin. 
April 15, 1903..Loomis, Henry P., New York, N. Y.. .Boudinot, Carre. 

April 20, 1906. .Lucas, Mrs. Mary R„ Georgetown, S. C Corcies. 

April 17, 1890.. Lucas, J. J., Society Kill, S. C Simons, DuPri 

April 13, 1902. .Lucas, Thos. S., Savannah, (.a DuPre, Simons 

April 13, 190? .Lucas, W. L., Laurens, S. ('., d DuPre, Simons 

April 13, 1893.. Manigault, Arthur M., Charleston, S. C Manigault 

Oct. 13, 1885. .Manigault, Edward, r Manigault 

Oct. 29, 1885. .Manigauit, Eliza S., /• Manigault 

Dec. 29,1889. .Manigault, Or Gabriel E., d Manigault 

July 27 1889. .Manigault, Henry M., Charleston, S. C, </ ..Manigault 

July 4, 1897.. Manigault, Joseph, Savannah, Ga d Manigault 

Oct. 30, 1885. .Manigault, Louis, d Manigault 

Oct. 30, l885..M-anigaulr, Man M., /■ Manigault 

N<»v. 2, 1895. .Marion, K. 15., Charleston, S. C ..Marion 

April 21, 1900. .Matthews, Mr-. [•'.. P., Charleston, S. Pcronneau 

April 13, 1905. .Mason, Mrs. Louisa, IV, d Sore. 

April 15. 1909.. Maury, Anne Herndon, Richmond, Va., I'm. i. Maury, 

de la Fontaine.. 

June 1, 1899. .Maury, M. 1c, Richmond, Va., d Maury, 

de la Fontaine. 

June 1, 1899,. Maury, Col. Richard L, Richmond, Va., d Maury, 

de la Fontaine. 

April 13, 1904..Maupin, Miss Sailie W., Baltimore, Md Maupin. 

April 13, 1904. .Maupin, Miss Margaret 1... Baltimore, Md.. .Maupin. 
April 13, 1910. .Mayrant, Miss Caroline Kinloch, Sumniervilte, S C... 

Mayrant, Guignard, De Lesselin 
Gaillard, Paparel, LeSemrier 

April 13. 1910. .Mayrant, Miss Harriet S'., Summerville S. C 

Simon, I hi pre. Le Serarier, Le- 
Ger, Macyek. DuBose, DuGue. 

April 13, 1910. .Mayrant, \V. R.. Summerville , S. C Mayrant, 

Guignard, DeLesselin, Gaillard, 
Paparel, Leger, LeSerurier. 

April 13. 1905 . . Mazyck, Miss Arabella S Mazyck, Porcher, de St. 

Julicn, f.eSerui icr, del hastaigner. 

April 13, 1899. .Mazyck, Miss Arabella, Charleston, S. Mazyck, 

I 'ore her, de St. J alien, de 
Chastaianer. Le Scrurier. * 



43 



Oct. 30, 1885.. Mazyck, Alexander II.. Charleston, S. C YIas$ck, 

Chastaigner, Gaillard, Le Seru 

ricr. 
April 13, 1902.. Mazyck, Ethel, Charleston, S. (' Mazyck, 

de Chastaigner, Gaillard, Le 

Scruricr. 
April 13, 1902. .Mazyck, Vallee, Charleston, S. C Mazyck, Le 

Scruricr, Chastaigner, Gaillard 

April 20, 1906. . Mazyck, Win. G., Jr Mazyck, dullard, 

dc Chastaigncr, LeSerurier 
April 2, 1885.. Mazyck,* Arthur, Charleston, S. C... Mazyck, Porcher, 

de St. j itlhn, de Chastaigner, 

Le Seruri.er.' 
April 13, 1894.,. Mazyck, Miss Catherine B., Charleston, S. C. . Mazyck, 

Porcher, de St. Julien, de ( has 

taigner, Le Scruricr. 
April 13, 1885.. Mazyck.* Edmund, d ..Mazfck, Porcher, de St. Julien, 

de Chais taigner, LeSerurier. 
April 2\ 1892.. Mazyck, Mrs. Epps Parker, (Arthur), Charles- 
ton, S. C Mazyck, Ravenel, LeSerurier 

April 2, 1885.. Mazyck,* Isaac, Charleston, S. C. .Mazyck, Porcher, 

dc St. Julien, Lc Scruricr, dc 

( hastaigncr. 
April 15, 1899.. Mazyck, Miss Marion, Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

dc Chastaigncr, Gaillard, Le 

Scruricr. 
April 7, 1890., Mazyck, Philip P., Charleston, S. C... Mazyck, Porcher, 

dc St. Julien, Le Scruricr, de 

Chastaigncr. 
April 13, 1885.. Mazyck,* Stephen, d Mazyck, Ravenel, Lc Noble, 

Lc Sci in icr, dc St. Julien. 
April 13, 1885. . Mazyck, * Win, Gaillard, Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

dc Chastaigner, Gaillard, Le 

Scruricr,. 

April 13, 1910.. Mazyck, McM. K., Charleston, S. C Mazyck. 

Jan. 11, 1890. .'Mazyck, Win. St. julien, d Mazyck, Pcrcher, dc Si. 

Julien, Lc Serin icr, dc Chas- 
taigner. 
April 15, 1905..McIver, Claudia P. (Mrs. G. \V. Mclver), Charles- 
ton, S. C. . . • Bounctheau, 

Simons. DuPre. 

April 20, 1906.. Macbeth, Ravenel Ravenel, Gaillard, Cordes, de 

Chastaigner. 
June 22, 1897: .Macbeth, Malcolm, St. Louis, Mo.. d..dc Chastaigner, 

Ravenel, Gaillard, Cordes. 



44 



April 2, 1901 



April 7, 1885. 
April 2, 1885. 
April 15, 1903. 
April 19, 1911. 

April 22, 1908 

April 15, 1907. 
April 15, 1909. 
I an. 13, 1890. 



Feb. 20, 1895. 



April 13, 1885. 
April 15, 1909. 
April 15, 1903. 
April 15, 1909. 



Nov. 2, 1895. 
April 13, 1902. 



April 15, 1903. 

April 13, 1910. 

April 13, 1910. 

April 13, .1904. 

April 14. 18m. 

April 13. 18<S5. 

April 13, 1902. 

April 15, 1903. 

April 19, 1911. 

April 13, 1885. 

April 15, 1907. 

April 15, 1907. 

Sept. 22, 1897, 

Nov. 16, 1897. 

April 13, 1905. 



McComb, Mrs. Anna L. f New Castle, Pa., (/ Le 

Serurier, Mazyck, Godin, 

Guerard. 
. McCrady, Edward, Charleston, S. C. d . . .DeBemidre. 
McCrady,* Louis d< P. .Charleston, S. C, d.De Berniere 
.McGowan, Mrs. C. P., Charleston, S. C, r .Peronneau. 

McElroy, Mrs. Mary Hardy, Kansas City, Mo 

Ditpuy. 

.McMillan, Mrs. Hess Porcher, Atlanta, Ga Porcher, 

deCherigny. 

, IVTesserole, J. V., Brooklyn, N. Y., d Messerple. 

.Memminger, C. Gustavus, Lakeland, Ida Mazyck, 

.Memminger, R. W., Jr., Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

'Porcher, De St. Julien, Le 

Serurier, de Chastaigner. 

Memminger, Mrs. Susan M., Charleston, S. C 

Mazyck, Porcher,, De St. Julien, 

LeSerurier, de l hastaigm r. 

Meynardie,* Rev. E. J., d ■ Meynardie 

.Miehanx, Marie Ella, Bennettsville, S. C Michaux. 

.Miles, Miss Margaret M., Mat Rock, N. C, d ..Bieme. 
.Miles, Mrs. Roberta Lawrence Hall, Charleston, 

S. C. Mazyck, LeSerurier, 

Gendron, I'oyas. 

Miles, Mrs. Mary P., d Peronneau 

.Miles, Sarah A., Charleston. S. C. . Mazyck, Porcher, 

de St. Julien, Le Serurier, de 

( hastaigner. 

.Miles, Miss Belty H.^ldal Rock, N. C Bieme. 

.Miller, Anna M., Adrian, Mich Branaugh 

Miller, Mrs. Edna Keels de Richbourg. 

.Miller, Miss Mary C Cothonneau, Legare. 

Miller, W, C, Charleston, S. C Legare, Cothonneau 

.Milnor,* Mrs. \i. M., Clwrlvston, S. C. d Legare 

( othonneau. 
Mitchell, Mrs. Pearl Maury, Bessemer, Ala Maury, 

Fontaine. 

.Mitchell, Edgar L., Bessemer, Ala Maury. 

.Moods, Mrs. Lihbie Shearn, Galveston, Texas ..Arge. 

.Morris,* C. Ellis, r Mazyck, RaveneL Le Noble 

.Morse, Marion K., New York, N. Y Serre. 

.Morgan, Mrs. Georgia Lawton, Springmore, \ ;i 

Brauye, LcGrand, Jaudon, Robert. 

.Motle, Rev, John W., Entawville, S. C .Motte 

. Motto, John \\\, Jr., Savannah, Ga Motic 

. Mouzon. Lawrence Mouzon 



! 



45 



April 13, 1904. .Munro, Mrs. Elizabeth B., Charleston, S. C 

• Manigault. 

.Myers, Frank K., Charleston, S. C DeRossett 

.Myers, Thomas E., Charleston, S. C DeRossette 

.Neufville,* /\nna C, Charleston, S. C Neitfville 

.Neuiville,* B. K., Charleston, S. C, d Neufville 

.Neufville,* II. S., d Neufville 

.Neufville,* Julia Y., d MeufvilU 

.Noble-, Mary, Miss, Galveston, Texas.. . .Bonneau, Roi, 
DuBHss, de Longuemare. 

.Norton, Mrs. Euphemia B Hannah, wife of 

Francis Cooke. 

.Norton, Mrs. Edith Emery Hannah, wife of 

Francis Cooke. 

.O'Brien, Mrs. Eliza N. \V \lazyck, LeSentrier, 

de Si. Julien, Ravenel, LeNoble. 

.O'Hear, James, Wando, S. C Legare 

.Oswald, George Douglas, James Island, S. C. . Robert 
Bruuye, Led i end , landon . 

. Palmer,* Agnes M Gaillard 

.Palmer,* Mrs. Alice A., Charleston, S. C Gaillard 

Porcher, de Cherigny, Macyck, Lc 
Serurxer. 

. Palmer, Dr. Joseph, Trial, S. O, d : . . .Gendron 

.Palmer, Mrs. Lucy I!., Cambridge, Mass Mauze. 

.Parker, Edward 1. ., d Peronneau 

.Parker, Dr. F. Lejaii, Charleston, S. C I.eJau, 

/ / nc/ucnin. 

. Parry, Aha B., Charleston, S. C Legare 

.Parry,* Mrs. Agnes, S., Charleston, S. C. ...... .Legare 

.Parry,* L. Toonier, r Let/are 

.Parry, Miss hie/ B., Charleston, S. C Legare. 

.Parry, Miss Susan 11, Charleston, S. C Legare 

.Paul Washburn, Pass Christian, Miss Prioleau. 

.Peronneau, Miss Susan If., Monteagle, Tenn 

Peronneau. 

Sept. 26, 1899. .Tinckney, Robt. Q., d Gaillard 

April 15, 1903. .Pollard, Mrs. R 

April 14, 1890.. Porcher, Miss Anna S., Charleston, S. C Porcher, 

Maztyck, Gendron. 

April 19, 1896. . Porcher, Miss Clelia S., Charleston, S. C Porcher, 

Mazyck, Gendron. 

April 13, 1885. .Porcher,* Prof. F. A., d Porcher, Mazyck, Gendrbn 

April 3, 1890. .Porcher, Dr. Francis Peyre, d ..Porcher, Peyre 



Feb. 


16, 


1900 


April 


13, 


1910 


April 


2, 


1885 


April 


2 


1885 


April 


2 


1885 


April 


2 


1885 


April 


13, 


1902 


April 


22, 


1908 


April 


22, 


1908 


April 


13, 


1904 


April 


13, 


1891 


Mar. 


21, 


1900 


April 


13, 


1885 


April 


13, 


1885 


April 


5, 


1890 


April 


13, 


1905 


April 


13, 


1891 


April 


13, 


1901 


April 


13, 


1902 


April 


2 


1885 


April 


2, 


1885 


April 


19 


1911. 


April 


21, 


1900 


April 


1 ( >, 


i ( ;n 


April 


27, 


1899 



46 



April 23, 1897..PORCHER, ISAAC de C, Bonneaus, S. c ..Porcher, 

de Cherigny, Ravenel, Mazpck, 
Le Voblt; dr St. J alien. Le 
Serurier. 

April 13, 1902.. Portlier, J. F., Charleston, S C. Porcher, de Cherigny 

May 5, 1897. .Porcher, Philip J::., Mount Pleasant, S. C Porcher, 

April 19, 1911. .Porcher, Mi.^s (Catherine Cordes. Pinopolis. . . ',. Marion, 

Del 'eaux. 
April LS, 19tl.. Proctor, Mrs. Antoinette Morris, Monroe City, Mo... 
1 Martin, Rapine, Guerrani Trabue. 
April 19, 19U .. Porcher, Samuel, Philadelphia, la Porcher. 

D it Hose, Cordes, Mazyck, Le 

Serurier. 
April 13, 1901 . .Porcher, Miss Virginia Leigh, Charleston, S. C 

Je Cherigny, Porcher, Peyre, 

Mazyck, LeNoble, Le Serurier. 
April 21, 1900.. Porcher, Mrs. Walter Peyre, Charleston, S. C ,.. 

I' ore her, Gail lard. 
April 13, 1901.. Porcher, Dr. Walter Peyre, Charleston, S. C 

Porcher, Mazyck, LeNoble, de 

Cherigny, Le Serurier. 
April 2, 1885.. PORCH Eg,* \YM. MAZYCK, d ..Porcher, Mazyck, 

LeSeriirier. 
April 13, 1885.. Porcher,* Wilmot D., Charleston, S. C DuPre 

de Cherigny, Gignilliat, Pelot, 

Porcher.. 
April 20, 1906. .Porcher, Philip G., d ...ranker, deCherigny, DuBose 

Cordes, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 20, 1906.. Porcher, Mrs. Mary F. C, Mt. Pleasant, S. C... Cordes 
April 13, 1907. .PORCHER, JOHN If., Pinopolis; S. C. d ... .Porcher. 

(/■ ( herigny, Ravenel, Mazyck, 
LeNoble, de St. Jnlim, LeSeru- 
rier. 

April 13, 1904. .Poyas, James (.)., d Poyas 

April 22. 1908 .Phillips, James Henry Witherspoon, Tampa, Fla., 

Richebourg. 

April 17, 1902. .Pr ingle, Mrs. Elizabeth \\\. Plantersville, S. C.Gibert. 
June 2, 1897..Pringle, Mrs. Man Ford, Charleston, S. C. . . Godin, 

Mazyck. 

April 13, 1905. .Prioleau, John G Prioleau, Gendron, Gaillard. 

April 2, 1885.. Prioleau,* Ann G., Charleston, S. C Prioleau, 

Gendron, 

April 2, 1885. . Prioleau,* Charlotte G., Charleston, S. C Guerard 

April 9, 1890. .Prioleau, Charles P., d Prioleau, Gendron 

April 13, 1885. .Prioleau,* Dr. Jacob Ford, d Priolmu, Gendron 



47 



Nov. 2, 1897. . Prioleau, Julian, Atlanta, Gi\ Prioleau, Gendron 

Nov. 25, 1897. .Prioleau, Morris, Atlanta, Ga Prioleau, Gendron 

May 30, 1890. .Prioleau, Philip, Atlanta, Ga Prioleau, Gendron 

Nov. 2, 1897. .Prioleau, Samuel, Atlanta, Ga Prioleau, Gendron 

April 2,. 1885.. Prioleau,* Dr. \V. II, Charleston, S. < Prioleau 

Gendron 

April 22, 1908..Quin!in, Mrs. Leonard G;, New York, N. Y Mouse. 

April 15, 1909. .Rand, Belle Palmer, Cambridge, Mass Mouse. 

April 21, 1890.. Randolph, Harrison, Charleston, S. C Bayard, 

Stuyvesant. 
April 21, 1900.. Randolph, Mrs. V. B., Charleston, S. C. ...... Bayard, 

Stuyvesant. 

Mar. 30, 1890. . Ravenel, Alfred Ford, d Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Masyck, Le Serurier. 

Oct. 30, 1885.. Ravenel, Miss C. P., Charleston, S. C Ravenel, 

Prioleau. 
Masyck, Cordes, LeSerurier, 
de St. Jul ie a 

April 2, 1885. .Ravenel,* Daniel, d Ravenel, Prioleau, Masyck, 

Le Serurier. 

April 2, 1885.. Ravenel,* Daniel, Jr., Charleston, S. C Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Masyck, LeSerurier 

April 13, 1898.. Ravenel, Dr. Edmond, Charleston, S. C Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Masyck, LeSerurier. 
Oct. 30, 1885.. Ravenel, Miss Elizabeth, Mei\, Charleston, S. C, d.... 

Ravenel, Prioleau, Masyck, 

Cordes, LeSerurier, de St. Julien. 

April 2, 1885. .Ravenel*, Miss Elizabeth Prioleau, Charleston, S. C. 

Ravenel, Prioleau, Masyck, Le 
Serurier 
April 13, 1885.. Ravenel*, Miss Elinor P., Charleston, S. C. .Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Masyck, Cordes, LeSeru- 
rier, de St. J alien. 

April 13, 1899. .Ravenel, Ellas Prioleau, Charleston, S. C Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Masyck, LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1898. .Ravenel. Miss Emma, Charleston. S. C, r ....Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Masyck, LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1885. .Ravenel*. Frank (i., Charleston, S. C, r ....Ravenel, 

Prioleau. Horry, Masyck, Le 
Serurier. 

April 13, 1885. .Ravenel*, Mrs. Harriet Parker, Charleston, S. C 

Masyck, Ravenel LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1885. .Ravenel*, Mrs. Harriott Horry, r ......Horry, Molte. 

April 13, 1885. .Ravenel*, Harriott Rutledge, Charleston, S. C, r .... 

Ravenel, Prioleau, Horry, Maxyck, 
LeSerurier. 



4* 



April 13, 1899. .Ravenel, Henry EL, Spartanburg, S. C Ravenel,' 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier, 

Oct. 30, 1885.. Ravenel, Henry \V„ d ....Ravenel, Mazyck, Le.Noble, 

de St. Jul ten. 
April 3, 1890. .Ravenel, II. S., r Ravenel, Mazyck, LeNoble, 

de St. Julien. 
April 17, 1890. .Ravenel, Heyward, Savannah, Ga., d Ravenel, 

Mazyck, Pore her, LeNoble, de 

St. Julien. 

Oct 30, 1885. .Ravenel, J. R. P., Charleston, 5. C Ravenel Prioleau, 

, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 13, -1885.. Ravenel*. John, r ..Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, 

LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1885. . Ravenel*, Louis, Chicago, III Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, Lt Serurier. 
April 2, 1885. .Ravenel*, Mary Coffin, d ..Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, 

LeSerurier. 
M'ch 31, 1890.. Ravenel,, Dr. Mazyck Porcher, Philadelphia. Pa 

Ravenel, Prioleau, Porcher, 

Mazyck, I e Serurier. 
April. 23, 1892.. Ravenel, Rene, d Ravenel, Mazyck, LeNoble, 

Del 'ctiux. de St /alien. 
April 13, 1885. .Ravenel* Robert Thurston, Baltimore, Md. . .Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
Oct. 20, 1885.. Ravenel, Rosa Pringle, Charleston, S. C Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
Oct. 30, 1885. .Ravenel, S. Prioleau, Philadelphia, Pa., d ....Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1885.. Ravenel* S. Prioleau, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa 

Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, Lc 

Serurier. 
May 30, 1890, .Ravenel, Stephen DeVeaux, Cordele, Ga Ravenel, 

Mazfck, !e Noble, de Veaux, 

de St. Julien. 
April 3, 1890.. RAVENEL, THOMAS PORCHER, d Ravenel, 

Mazyck, Porcher, LeNoble, 

de St. Julien. 
April 8, 1890. .Ravenel, Thos. Porcher, Jr., Savannah, Ga.. . .Ravenel, 

Mazyck, Porcher, LeNoble, 

de St. Julien. 
April 2, 1885. .Ravenel* Wm, d Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 1, 1890. .Ravenel, Win. Pee, Charleston, S. C Ravenel, 

Prioleau. Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1885. .Ravenel*, Dr. Wm. Chardon, Atlanta, Ga., d 

Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, 

LeSerurier. 



I 

I 

I 



49 



April 15. 1903 

April 15, 1907. 

April 15, 1903. 

April 15. 1903. 

April 15. 1907. 

April 12. 1890. 

April 13, 1902, 

April 13, 1885. 

Jan. 29, 1892. 

April 17, 1897 

April 14, 1890. 

Oct. 9, 1890. 

April 15, 1903. 

April 20, 1900. 

April 13, 1902 

April 13, 1910. 

April 2, 1888. 

Nov. 25, 1897. 

April 8, 1890. 

April 14, 1890, 

April 14, 1890 

April 15, 1909. 



.Ravenel, Miss Marguerite A., Philadelphia, Pa 

Raven el, Prioleau, Gendron, 
Mazyck, LeSerurier. 

.Ravenel, Samuel \V., Boonville, Mo Ravenel, 

Porcher, Mazyck, LeNoble, de 
St. J alien, LeSerurier. 

.Ravenel, W. deC, Washington, 1). C Ravenel, 

DuBo.se , Porcher, Mazyck, LeNo- 
ble, de St. Julie a, LeSerurier. 

.Ravenel,, Miss Clare W., Philadelphia, Pa Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Gendron, Mazyck, 
LeSerurier. 

.Ravenel, A. E. F., Roanoke, Va Ravenel, Prioleau. 

Mazyck, LeSerurier Gendron. 

.'Reeves, John B., Charleston, S. C Bonne theau. 

.Reeves, Mrs. John B., Charleston, S. C Simons, 

Dul're. 

. Reid*, Alary Burden, Charleston, S. C, d Legate. 

.Richardson, John M., d Guignard, DeLesleine. 

.Richardson, Thos. B., Sumter, S. C Guiynard, 

DcLeslcinc. 

. Robert Pierre, Robertville, S. C Robert 

.Robert, Rev. Win. H., Centerfiekl, Mass t. Robert. 

.Robert, John 11., Carnett, S. C Robert. 

.Roberts, Belle Sumter, Birmingham, Ala l J oyas, 

Leyare. 

.Robertson Henry G., Franklin, N. C .Marion, Baluet. 

.Robinson, Ellen Llewellyn, St. Louis, Mo., Jacquelin. 

.Rodgers*, S. II., Beaufort, S C Leyare. 

.Rogers, Miss Louisa, New York, N. Y Gignilliat. 

.Rose. \V. II., Columbia, S. C Mazyck, Godin, 

Guerard. 

.Rutledge, Gen'l Benj. liuger, d Huger. 

.Rutledge, B. 11., Jr., r linger. 

.Sease. Mrs. Mary Olivia Shecut, Orangeburg, S. C 



April 22, 1908 .Seyburn, Mrs. Kathleen, \\ .. Patterson, 1 .Mjzy/k, 

LeSerurier, LeNoble, a. Si. 

J alien, Ravenel. 
April 13, 1901.. Shackelford, Mrs. Anne R., Charleston, S. C. . Thomas. 
April 15, 1907. .Shield.-;. Mrs. Mazyck W Maz$ck, 

LeSerurier, Ravenel, LeNoble, 

de St. J alien. 
April 13, 1910. . Shropshire, Mrs. Susan Jane Martin, Nealton, Ky... 

Trabue, Martin, G iterant, Rapine-. 
April 19, 1911.. Selkirk, Mrs. Louise Mann, Galveston, Texas 

Pickens. 



April 15, 1907. 
April 15. 1909. 
May 30, 1890, 
April 22, 1908. 

April 13, 1904. 

April 22, 1908. 
April 15, 1907. 

April 13, 1904. 

April 13, 1885. 
Jul}- 18, 1898. 

April 5. 1890, 
April 13, 1910. 



April 13, 1910. 



April 13, 1910 



July 12, 1897. 
April 19, 1911 



April 13, 1902, 

April 13, 1901 

April 13, 1885 

April 17, 1896 

April 23, 1891 

April 15, 1907 

April 15, 1903 

April 15, 1909 

April 22, 1908 

April 13, 1901 

June 14, 1895 



5<J 

.Semple, Mrs. [sabel, J. !•' , St. Louis, Mo Macon. 

Sloan. Frank Porcher, Atlanta, Ga Portlier 

.Simons, Arthur St. J, Charleston, S. C Simons. 

Simons, Joseph A., Wilmington, Del Simons, 

DuPre. 
Simons, Edw A., Charleston, S. C Simons, DnPri, 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
.Simons, Mrs. Annie E., Berkeley Co., S. C. . .Caillard. 
.Simons, Mrs. Josephine Alston Horry, Georgetown, 

S. C 1 1 any. 

.Simons, Eugene N., Charleston, S. C. ., Simons, I Jul' re, 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 

.Simons*, Dr. Manning, Charleston, S. C, r Simons. 

Simon,, P. Noble, New York, N. Y Mazyck, 

Simons. 
.Simons, Dr. T. Grange, Charleston, S. C. Simons. 
.Simons, Mrs. S. Eewis,' Stimmerville, S. C, May/ ant, 

Guignard, l)e Leseleine, Caillard, 

Ravenel, Legare, Le Serurier. 
.Simons, Miss May Ton, Charleston, S. S. Simons, 

Dit Pre, Le Serurier, Legare, 

Mazyck, DuBose, DuGui. 
.Simons, Drayton, S. C, Mayrant, 

Guignard.fi Pe Lesseliu, Caillard, 
Ravenel, Legare, Le Serurier, 

Simons, DuPre, Mazyck, Ou 

IJuCue, St. Julian, Le Serurier, 

.Sinkler, Mrs. Annie \V., Eutawville, S. C Porcher. 

.Siukler, Mrs, Ellen Simons Hall, Charleston, S. C 

PeSeurrti r . Leger, Simons Dupre, 

Po.yas, Gendron, Trezcvant, Mau- 

Uird, Mazyck. 

, Sinkler, Huger, Charleston, S €., r llu</cr. 

.Siukler, Thomas S„ Charleston, S. C Huger. 

.Smith*, D. 1-:. Huger, Charleston, S C... linger. 

.Smith, Roht. T., Charleston, S. C, r linger. 

.Smith, S. Porcher, Mount Pleasant, S. C Porcher. 

.Smith, P. R , Charleston, S, C Robert. 

.Smith, Mrs. Z. P., Louisville, Ky DnPity, 

Prabue, Ploumoy. 
.Smith, II. A. M„ Charleston, S. C. (Hon. Mem.)... 
. Smythe, A. T., Jr., Charleston, S. C Turquand, 

Courtonne. 
.Smythe. Cheves McCord, Charleston, S. C. .Turquand. 
.Smythe, Mrs. Louisa McC, Charleston, S. C... 

Turquand. 






5' 



Sept. 15, 1888..Snowden, Yates, Columbia, S. C Le Queux. 

M'ch 8, 1885..Soratly, Mrs. M. G., Mobile, Ala Gaillard. 

April 19 1911.. Squire, Airs. Corinne L, .Yew York, M. Y Robert. 

April 13, 1910. .Stanhope, Mrs. Annette Martin, Lexington, Ky 

Trabue, Rapine, Guerant, Martin. 
M'ch 31, 1891 . .Stevens, Rev. P. !•'., Orangeburg, S. C, d..Fayssoux. 

April 13, 1902. .Stiles, Rev. Charles A., Eastover, S. C, d Legare. 

April 14, 1890. .Stillman, Miss Anna R., Charleston, S. C, 

Author on Hu uenot Subject. 
April 13, 1885. .Stoney*, Mrs. Harriet Pprcher, d * ..Gaillard, P or cher. 

July 15, 1887 . . Stoney, Samuel, D., d Gaillard. 

April 13, 1885. .Stoney*, Samuel G., Charleston, S. C Gaillard, 

Pure her. 
April 13, 1910. .Stoney, S. G., Jr., Charleston, S. C, Gaillard, Porcher. 

April 13, 1902. .Stoney, Mrs. S. G., Charleston, S. C Turquand. 

Aug. 6, 1894. .Stoney, Thomas l'., Charleston, S. C, Gaillard, Porcher. 

Oct. 30, 1885 . . Stoney, Wm. E., d Gaillard. 

April 15, 19v)7..Strauch, Miss Maud Mitchell, ticw York, N. Y 

Macon. 
April 13, 1904. .Taliaferro, Mrs. S., San. Antonio, Texas Poyas, 

deLeseleine. 

Aug. 22, 1898.. Taylor, Miss A. 11., Columbia, S. C Manigault. 

April 22, 1908.. Tate, Mrs. Mary L., Greensboro, N. C Couturier, 

linger. 

April 7, 1900.. Terry, Mrs. E. G., Heflin, Ala Gibert. 

April 14, 1890. . Thomas, John P., Jr., Columbia, S. C Couturier, 

Guignard, DeLesleine, Peyre. 

April 13, 1885. .Thomas*, S., Jr., Charleston, S. C Thomas. 

April 2, 1885. .Thomas*, Dr. T. Gaillard, New York, N. Y., d .... 

Gaillard. 

Oct. 30, 1885. .Toomer, Miss M. E., r Sarazin. 

April 13, 1888. . Trapier, Rev. R. S., d Trapier. 

M'ch 19, 1890. .Trapier, T. D., r Trapier. 

Oct. 9, 1 890.. T relevant, J. T., Dallas, Texas Trezevant. 

April 15, 1907. .Tilton, Mrs. Henrietta, B. M., Seattle, Wash.. .Hannah 

Cook , ( 11 'alloun) . 
April 15, 1909. .Trescot, Katherinc Bocquet, Clemson Cullege, S. C... 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1905 .. Thomas, Mrs. Lottie R., Charleston, S. C 

Buiiiielheau. 

April 13, 1910.. Thomas, Robert G., Charleston, S. C Guignard. 

April 15, 1.907. .Thompson, Miss Mary Elliott, Ellicott City, Md 

deMarbeuf. 

April 15, 1907. .Trenhohn, Miss Julia E., Charleston, S. C Lex/are. 

April 13, 1904. .Turner, Rev. Charles 11. B Toumeur, 

1'oiusette, Faucheraud, Duron- 

scan, \ cer'mg. 



April 


13, 


1905 


April 


15, 


1907 


April 


13. 


1905 


April 


13, 


1905 


April 


21, 


1900 


April 


13, 


1885 


April 


13, 


1885 


April 


13, 


1910 



52 

April 19, 1911.. Turner, Mrs. Nettie Viola Chastain. \ T ew Smyrna, I la 

( Juistuiii. 

.Vaill, Mrs. Charlotte F. S;. Portland, Me Moleyn. 

.Vaill, E. G. Portland, Mc Moleyn, Byssell. 

.Vaill, Miss Julia C, Portland, Me Moleyn. 

.Vaill, Fred S., Portland. Me Moleyn. 

.Vander liorst, Mrs. A. A., Charleston, S. C....Gibert. 
.Vedder*, Rev. Chas. S.. Charleston, S. C, pastor 
French Protestant Huguenot Congregation. 

.Verner*. J. S. Columbia, S. C / 'enter. 

.Viley, Breckenridge, Versailles, Ky.. .Martin, Guerant, 

Rav'enel. 
April 2, 1885.. Walker*, Mrs. E. C, Atlanta, Ga Ravenel, Prioleau 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
.Wallace, Mrs. Helen Yates, Charleston S. C.Legare. 

. Ware, Mrs. Mary S., r Marye 

.Waties, Miss Katherine Calhoun, Columbus, Cia 

Maz$ck. 

.Waties, Thomas, Houston, Tex Mazyck. 

.Weeks, Mrs. Washington Hunter, Washington, 

1). C • Macon. 

. Watkins, I ley ward 1 Tresevant. 

.Westervelt*. Mrs. Emily P., Greenville, S. C 

Gaillard. 

.Westervell*, J. Irving, Greenville, S. C Gaillard. 

.Whaley, W. Gibbes, Charleston, S. C, r . . ..PeronneatL 

Wilbur, Walter 15.. Charleston, S. C Cothoneau. 

.Wilbur, T. S.. Charleston. S. C Cothoneau. 

.Wilkinson, Mrs. L. B. W., Washington, 1). C.DuPuy. 

LeVillqvi. 
.Williams, Mrs. Serena Cliesnut, Baltimore, Md.. Gibert, 

1\ tiium. 
.Williams, Dr. T. Whit ridge, Baltimore, Md .. . .Maury, 

Fontaine. 

.Willis, r. H., Charleston, S. C Shecut, Gabeau. 

.Willis, Miss A. I [ Shecut t Gabeau. 

.Willis*,, Edward, Charleston, S. C, d. .Shecut, Gabeau. 
.Willis, Miss Kola. Charleston, S. C... Shecut, Gabeau. 
.Wilson, Miss S. Annie, r Mazyck, LeNoble, 

Ravenel, LeSerurier, de St. Julien. 

.Wilson, Dr. G. Fraser, Vergereau, Boudinol. 

.Wilson, Mrs. Harriett Chisolm, Charleston, S. C 

Gendron, Porcher. 
April 13, 1885. .Wilson*, James Mazyck, d Mazyck, Ravenel, 

LeNoble, de St. Julien, LeSerurier. 



April 


20, 


1906 


April 


15, 


191)5 


April 


13, 


1910 


April 


13, 


1910 


April 


13, 


1905 


April 


13, 


1905 


April 


13, 


1885 


April 


13, 


1885 


Oet. 


30, 


1885 . 


April 


15, 


1907 


April 


13, 


1905 


April 


22 


1908 


April 


79 


1908 


Nov. 


1, 


1899 


April 


15, 


1903 


April 


22 


1908 


April 


) 


1885 


April 


13, 


1899 


April 


13, 


1904 


April 


13, 


1905 


April 


21, 


1900 



53 

M'ch 31, 1890.. Wilson, Rev. Robert, 1). 1)., Charleston, $. C 

Masyckj Ravenel, LeNoble, de 
St. Jul icH, LeSerurier, 

April 19, 1897. .Wilson, Robert, Jr., M. D., Charleston, S. C.Mazyck, 

Ravenel, LeNoble, de St. Julia, 

LeSerurier. 
April 10, 1899. .Wilson, Miss Sue Guignard, Charleston, S. C, d .... 

Mazyck, Ravenel, de St. J alien, 

Guignard, DeLesleine, Le Sou- 
lier, Le Noble. 
April 19, 1897. .Wilson, Miss Susan Ravenel, Charleston, S. C 

Mazyck, Ravenel, LeNoble, de St. 

J alien, LeSei uner. 

April IS, 1909.. Wilcox, John, Marion, S. C Trezevant. 

April 19, l911..Witherspoon, Mrs. lilien Douglas, Versailes, ky 

Emigrants. 
April 22, 1908. .Witherspoon, Mrs.. M. V., Versailles, Ky Trahue, 

Guerrantj Martin. 
April 13, 1902..Witte, Mrs. Ida Reeves, Charleston, S. C. .Bottnetheau 

Legare. 
April 13, 1902..Witte, Htilda, Charleston, S. C. d Bounetheau, 

Leg are. 
May 14, 1898. .Witte, Mrs. Rosa Glenn, Charleston, S. C. Legate, 

Bounetheau. 

April 19, 191 1 . . Woods, Robert F., I Arlington, S. C DuBose 

April 13, 1905.. Woods, Hon. Charles A., Marion, S. C DuBose. 

April 15, 1909.. Woods, Malcolm C, Marion, S. C DuBose 

April 13, 1902.. Woods, W. D., Darlington, S. C DuBose. 

April 13, 1902. .Worcester, Mrs. Davie L., Cincinnati, O Lai'illtun, 

DuPre. 

April 19, 1911. .Wright, Mrs. Anne Minis, J act son. Miss Ve'rriue. 

April 13, 1902. .Wright, Mrs. Hannah MeC. Savannah, Ga 

Turquand. 
April 13, 1901..\Vyekhain, Mrs. Julia Porcher I'oreher, Peyre, 

Mazyck, LeNoble. 

April 5, 1890. .Young, Henry E., Charleston, S. C Gourd in. 

April 15, 19()7..Zachry, Mrs. F.lise Thompson, New York, N. Y 

Horry, LaRoehe, Qgier. 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF TNI 

HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH 

CAROLINA. 



Article L 

Name. 



The name of this organization shall be "The Huguenot 
Society of South Carolina." 

Object. 

Article II. 

The object of the Society shall be: 

Firstly, To perpetuate the memory and to foster and 
promote the principles and virtues of the Huguenots. 

Secondly, To publicly commemorate at stated times the 
principal events in the history of the Huguenots. 

Thirdly, To discover, collect and preserve all still exist- 
ing documents monuments, etc., relating to the genealogy 
or history of the Huguenots of America in general, and of 
those of South Carolina in particular. 

Fourthly, To gather by degrees a library for the use of 
the Society, composed of all obtainable books, monographs, 
pamphlets, manuscripts, etc., relating to the Huguenots. 

Fifthly, To cause statedly to be prepared and read be- 
fore the Society, papers, essays, etc., on Huguenot history 
or genealogy and collateral subjects. 

Article III. 

Membership. 

Section i. The membership of this Society shall be as 
follows : 



55 

Firstly, All descendants in the direct male or female lines 
of the Huguenot families which emigrated to America prior 
to the promulgation of the Edict of Toleration, November 
28, 1787. 

Secondly, Representatives of oilier French families, 
whose profession of the Protestant Faith is anterior to the 
promulgation of the Edict of Toleration, November 28, 
1787. 

Thirdly, Pastors of French Huguenot congregations in 
South Carolina. ' 

Fourthly, Writers who have made the history, genealogy, 
principles, etc., of the Huguenots a special subject of study 
and research, to whatever nationality they may belong. 

Sec. 2. The members of the Society may consist of 
three classes: Resident, Corresponding and Honorary; but 
the rights and privileges of each class shall be the same. 

Sec. 3. The annual fees of Resident and Corresponding 
members shall be one dollar, and the payment of twenty 
dollars shall constitute one a life member. All dues shall 
be paid in advance. 

Sec. 4. The funds of this Society shall be applied only 
to the furtherance and realization of the objects contem- 
plated in this constitution. 

Sec. 5. All life-membership fees shall be invested by 
the Executive Committee (hereinafter provided for) in the 
name of the Society, and only the interest arising there- 
form shall be used for the purposes of the Society. 

Sec. o. Application for membership, with a statement 
of the name, address, profession, and descent of the appli- 
cant, shall be made in writing to the Executive Committee, 
who shall report thereon at the next meeting of the Society. 
If their report be favorable, the candidate shall be consid- 
ered as duly elected; but if demanded, the election shall 
be by ballot, and a two-thirds vote of the members present 
shall be necessary to elect, livery application lor mem- 
bership shall be accompanied by one year's dues. 



56 

Article IV. 

Section i. The officers of the Society shall con>hi of a 
President, a Vice-President for each original llugcnot 
centre or settlement in South Carolina, a Secretary and 
Treasurer, an Historian, and an Executive Committee 
composed of the President, Vice-President, the Secretary 
and Treasurer, the Historian, and five members elected by 
the Society. 

Sec. 2. Besides the ordinary rights and duties of a pre- 
siding officer,- the President shall appoint the places of meet- 
ing; in conjunction with the Secretary and Treasurer, he 
shall have the power, and upon the written request of five 
members it shall he his duty, to call special meetings of 
the Society, and he shall sign all drafts drawn on the 
Treasnrer. 

Sec. 3. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Presidents to in- 
terest in the objects of this Society the Huguenots of the 
localities which they represent; in the absence of the Presi- 
dent of this Society, a Vice-President shall preside and ex- 
ercise all the rights and privileges of the President; and if 
more than one Vice-President be present, the senior V ice- 
President in attendance shall be the presiding officer. 

Sec. 4. It shall be the duty of the Secretary and Treas- 
urer to keep an accurate record of all the proceedings of the 
Society and of the Executive Committee; to conduct the 
correspondence of the Society; to notify members of the 
meetings of the Society; to inform officers and new mem- 
bers of their election. 

It shall also be his duty to collect all dues, fees and other 
moneys belonging to the' Society, and to deposit the same 
in some bank in the City of Charleston in the name of the 
Society. Out of these sums he shall pay such sums only 
as may be ordered by the Society through its President, or 
the Executive Committee. lie shall keep an accurate ac- 
count of its receipts and disbursements, and render an 
account of the same at each annual meeting of the Society, 
which shall name a committee to audit them. For his 



57 

services he shall be allowed ten per centum of all amounts 

collected by him. 

Sec. 5. It shall be the duty of the Historian to have in 
his keeping" all hooks, pamphlets, manuscripts, etc.. per- 
taining or belonging to the Society, and to receive and col- 
lect data relating to the History of the Huguenots before 
and since their settlement in America. 

Sec. 6. It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee 
to examine and pass upon the credentials of candidates; to 
invest and lyianage the funds of the Society; to engage 
suitable persons to deliver the addresses and prepare the 
papers contemplated in this contribution, and to make all 
other arrangements necessary for the meetings of the So- 
ciety, and to transact all business of the Society not other- 
wise provided for in the constitution. 

Sec. 7. The officers of the Society shall be annually 
elected at the anniversary meeting; but if any vacancy 
occur during the year the Executive Committee shall have 
power to appoint a member of the Society to till such 
vacancy for the unexpired term. 

Article I'. 

Meetings. 

This Society shall hold two regular meetings each year 
and, in accordance with the purpose of the Society, the 
said meetings shall take place on the following historical 
dates : 

Section i. The Anniversary Meeting shall be held on 
April 13th, the day of the Promulgation of the Edict of 
Nantes, granting Freedom of Worship to the Huguenots of 
France. 

Sec. 2. The Autumn meeting of the Society shall be 
held on the 22d of October, the date of the Revocation of 
the Edict of Nantes. 

Sec. 3. The Executive Committee shall have power to 



58 

arrange lor a dinner, or other collation, annually as they 
may deem most appropriate. 

Sec. 4. fn case any of these dates should fall upon a day 
inconvenient for the proper celebration thereof, the lixecu- 
tive Committee shall appoint for the meeting the next most 
convenient day. 

BY-LAWS. 

Section 1. Notices of meetings shall be given at least 
one week in advance. 

Sec. 2. It shall always require fifteen members to con- 
stitute a quorum for the transaction of business. 

Sec. 3. At all meetings of the Society the order of busi- 
ness shall be as follows : 
Prayer. 

1. The reading and adopting of the minutes of the pre- 

vious meeting. 

2. Reports of officers. 

3. Reports of the Executive Committee. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Reports of special committees. 

6. Miscellaneous business. 

7. Election of officers. 

8. The reading of papers or delivery of addresses before 

the Society. 

9. Adjournment. 

Skc. 4. All resolutions must be presented in writing 10 
the Chair. 

Sec. 5. If any member neglect or refuse to pay his an- 
nual fees for two consecutive years, the Treasurer shall 
report his name to the Executive Committee, win* may 
strike his name from the roll of membership. 

Sec. 6. Such members of the Society as do not them- 
selves bear Huguenot names shall add to their own names 
(on signing the constitution) the Huguenot names through 
which they claim descent. 

Sec. 7. The original Huguenot settlements in this State, 



59 

each one of which is entitled to a Vice-President, are as 
follows: Charleston, Purysburg and New Bordeau. 

Sec, 8. The Constitution and By-Laws of this Society 
may he amended or repealed at any meeting of the Society 
by a two-thirds vote; but the changes proposed must have 
been submitted at a previous meeting. They may also be 
amended or repealed by a vote of a majority of all the 
members of the Executive Committee at any meeting dur- 
ing the recess of the Society: Provided, the amendment 
so adopted shall be confirmed at the next meeting of die 
Society. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE SOCIETY. 

Transactions No. i. Published in icS8g. 

An account of the organization of the Society in 

1885. 

List of names of Charter members. 

List of officers, 188540 1889. 

Memorial to Genl. Wilmot G. deSaussure. late presi- 
dent of the Society. 

Short sketches of the lives of late members, etc., etc. 

President Daniel Ravenel's Annual Address. 

Address by Wm. St. Julien Jervey, Esq., delivered 
at the Annual Meeting, AprJJ 13th, 1889. 

[Out of Print. 
Transactions No. 2. An historical sermon delivered at the 
French Protestant Church, on Sunday, April 13, 1800, 
by the Rev. Charles S. Vedder, D. D., Pastor; with 
picture of Church and list of Pastors from 1686 to 
1890. 

Proceedings of the Anniversary Meeting, April 14, 
1890. 

List of officers and new members. 

"Ivry," a Poem, by Rev. C. S. Vedder, D. D. 

An address before the Society, by Hon. Thomas 
F. Bayard, etc., etc. 
Transactions No. 3. Published in 1804. Report of Presi- 
dent Wm. St. Julien Jervey, at Annual Meeting, April 



6o 



13th, 1891, and list of officers of the Society. Presi- 
dent's Address at Annual Meetings of [893 and 1K94. 
List of officers and list of members elected since 1890. 
Short sketches of the lives of deceased members. 

An address before the Society, on the Early Hugue- 
nots and their emigration to America, by Gabriel E. 
Manigault, M. I ). [Out of Print. 

Transactions No. 4. Published 1897. Papers on some 
Early Huguenot families in South Carolina : a The 
Legare Family, b The linger Family, with pedigree. 
c The Marion Family', d The Manigault Family fr >m 
1665 h> 1886, with portraits. 

A paper on the Huguenot Inlluence in Colonial 
South Carolina, by Rev. Robt Wilson, IX I). 

Sketches of the lives of late deceased members 1 i 
the Society, etc., etc. 
Transactions No. 5. Published [898. 1. The First Hu- 
guenot Immigrants from 1,670 to [680. r68o to 1690, 
1690 to 1700. 

Hostility of the English Settlers to the French, etc. 

Naturalization of Huguenot Residents. 

List of names of French and Swiss Refugees in 
Carolina, etc. Character of the Huguenots. 

Hhe Huguenot Churches in South Carolina: St. 
John's Parish, Berkeley; St. Dennis Parish, or Orange 
Quarter; Settlement and Church on Santee River. 

The Huguenots of Abbeville, S. C, etc., etc 

Founding of the South Carolina Society oi Charles- 
ton. 

Notices of Conspicuous Members oi the Gaillard 
Family. 
Transactions No. 6. Published 1899. An Historical 
Sketch of the Prioleau Family in Europe and Amer- 
ica, with illustrations, by Rev. Robt. Wilson, D. D., 
and Gabriel Manigault, M. D. 

The Ravenel Family in France and America, by 
Daniel Ravenel, Sr,, etc., etc. 



\ 



6 1 



Transactions No. 7. Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual 
Meeting of the Society, April 21st, [900. 

List of officers. 

An Historical Sketch of the Huguenot Congrega- 
tions of South Carolina: French Santee, Orange 
Quarter, St. John's, Berkeley; the Church of Charles- 
ton, by the late Daniel Ravenel, of Charleston, with 
notes by the late Gen. Wilmot G. DeSaussure, of 
Charleston. 
Transactions No. .8. Proceedings of the Sixteenth Anni- 
versary Meeting of the Society, April [3th, IQOI. 

Annual address of President Robert Wilson, 1). D. 

Resume of Transactions, 1807 to 10,01. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 

List of members' with names of original Huguenot 
Families from whom descended. 

Letter from the Honorable Alfred linger, upon the 
death of Mr. Petigru. 

A Narrative of the Life and Services of Francis 
G. DeLieseline during the War of the American Rev- 
olution, by Dr. Win. C. Ravenel. 
Transactions No. 9. Minutes of the Seventeenth Annual 
Meeting of the Society, April 17th, [902. 

The President's Address. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 

Enlarged and revised list of members, with name 
or names of persons from whom they derive their 
descent. 

An address on the Farly Huguenots, delivered be- 
■ fore the Society by Col. Richard L. Maury, of Rich- 
mond, Va. 
Transactions No. 10. Minutes of the Eighteenth Annual 
Meeting of the Society, held April 15th, 1903. List 
of officers. President's Address. Historian's Report. 
Some wills of South Carolina Huguenots; copies in 
original French, with translations in English. A 
paper, entitled The Huguenots in Dublin, by ,Rev. 
Robt. Wilson, D. D. 



62 



Transactions No. II. Minnies of the Nineteenth Animal 
Meetings of the Society, held April 13th, 1904. 

Annual Address of President Robt. Wilson. 

A brief memorial to Francis Marion. 

'The Huguenots of South Carolina," an Address 
before the Society, by Mr. Thomas \V. Bacot. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 

Some Wills of South Carolina Jlnguenots; copies 
in original 'French, with translations in English; with 
comments by Rev. Robert Wilson, D. 1). Continued 
from No. 10. 

A list of Contents of the preceding numbers of the 
Transactions of the Society. 
Transactions No. 12. Minutes of the 20th Annual Meet- 
ing of the Society, held April 13th, 1905. 

List of officers. 

Historian's Report. 

President's Report. 

Huguenot Immigration in South Carolina. 

A Short Story of Three Brothers. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 

Publications of the Society. 
Transactions Nu. 13. Minutes of the 21st Annual Meeting 
of the Society, held April 20th, 1906. 

I i>t of officers. 

Historian's Report. 

Annual Address of President. 

Hie French Protestant Church, Paper read by Miss 
Ravenel. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

Upper Beat of St. John's, Berkeley, by late 
F. A. Porcher. 

Constitution and By-] .aws. 

Antoine Gabean, by Miss Willis. 

Additional Data on Cordes Family. Maj. 
Lucas and 1). F. Huger Smith, Esq. 



Prof. 



i 
1 



! 



6.5 

Old Document on Bruneau Family. Mr. A. S. 
Salley, Jr. 

Notes from Crottet Mss. 

Publications of the Society. 
Transactions No. 14. List of Officers. 

Minutes of 22d Annual Meeting-. 

Report of Historian. 

President's Address. 

Huguenots on Santee River, by late Henry A. De- 
Saussure. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots, Editorial Notes. 

Dr. J. L. E. W. Shecut, Miss Eola Willis. 

Ribault's Fort. Miss Isabelle DeSaussure. 

Miscellaneous. 

List of Members. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 

List of Publications of the Society. 
Transactions No. 15. 

List of officers. 

•Minutes of 23d Annual Meeting. 

Treasurer's Statement. 

Report of Historian. 

President's Address. 

Poem. The Bretons. 

Wills of S. C. Huguenots. Editorial Notes. 

Notice of Rene Ravenel, Immigrant. 

The Last oi the Huguenots. Stephen Thomas. 

The Isle of Oleron. M. M. de Richemond and 
Thomas. 

List of Members, revised. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 

List of Publications of the Society. 
Transactions No. 16. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of 24th Annual Meeting. 

Reports. 

President's Address. , 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

The State of French Protestants after 1685. 



6-1 



Correspondence and Plat Site of Old Goose Creek 
French Church. 

The French Huguenot Church of the Parish of St. 

James, Coose Creek. 

List of members revised. 
Constitution and By-Laws. 
List of Publications of Society. 
Transactions No. 17. 
List of officers. 

Minutes of 25th Annual Meeting. 
Reports of officers. 
President's Address. 
Wills of South. Carolina Huguenots. 
The Huguenots in America (By Hon. A. T. Clear- 
water. ) 

Note on Sompayrac, 
Letter concerning Lew Mr. Pouderous. 
Huguenot Lineage of Erroll II. Colcock. 
Rook Notices: "Les Freres Gibert." The Journal 
of American History, Vol. XIX, No. Ill, 3d Quarter. 
List of Members. 
Constitution and By-Laws. 
Publications of the Society. 
All members in good standing receive the publications 
from the date of their membership without charge. 

Price: Copies of back numbers of the Transactions, ex- 
cept Numl)ers One and Three, which are out of print, will 
be mailed to members oi the Society 011 receipt of 40 cents. 
To other than members the price is 60 cents each, post paid. 
Address communications to Dr. J. Bachman Chisolm, 
Secretary, 26 Broad Street, Charleston, S. C. 



TRANSACTIONS 



OF THE 



Huguenot Society 



OF 

South Carolina 
No. 19 

PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY 








CHARLESTON, S. C. 
1912 



PRESS OF 

WALKER EVANS a COGSWELL CO 

CHARLESTON S C 



The Committee on Publication 15 not responsible for 
statements or opinions in original articles published from 

author's manuscript or certified copy. 



The Society Pins or Badges may be obtained by mem- 
bers from the Secretary, postage free, at the rate of $1.50 
for silver enamel, or $4.00 for gold enamel. The pin 
represents the Seal of the Society reduced. 

Certificates of Membership, with date of election, will 
be mailed to members after election as soon as they can 
be signed and filled in. 



Members of the Society are earnestly requested to notify 
the Secretary of change in residence and Post Office ad- 
dress, or change of name by marriage. Also of any death 
among the membership which may come to their knowl- 
edge. 



OFFICERS 1912-1913 



PRESIDENT 

Rev. ROBERT WILSON, D. D. 

t VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Lor Charleston— STEPHEN THOMAS, 

For Purysburg— T. W. BACOT, 

For New Bordeaux— CH AS. P. ALLSTON. 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Dr. J. BACHMAN CHISOLM. 

HISTORIAN 

WM. G. MAZYCK. 



EX ECUTIVE CO M M I TTEE 

ARTHUR MAZYCK, 

Dr. T. GRANGE SIMONS, 

THEO. G. BARKER, 

WILLIAM C. MILLER, 

JOHN B. REEVES. 



The President, Vice-Presidents, Secretary and Treas- 
urer, and Historian are ex-otTicio members of the Execu- 
tive Committee. 



MINUTES 



Charleston, S. C, April 15, 1912. 

The 27th Anniversary Meeting- of the Society was 
held this day at tne South Carolina Hall, at S.M) P. M. 
A quorum being present, the meeting was called to 
order by the President. 

The meeting was opened with prayer by Rev. Robert 
Wilson, D. D. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and con- 
firmed. 

The Treasurer read his report, which was received as 
information and ordered spread on the minutes. 

The President submitted the report of the Uxecutive 
Committee, which was ordered spread on the minutes. 

The following applicants for membership were duly 
elected members of the Society : 

1. James Petigrew Carson. Charleston, S. C. 

2. Mrs. Andrew Rose Texarkana, Texas. 

3. Alexander Robert Lawton . .. Savannah, Ga. 

4. jane DnBose Roberts .... ... New York, N. V. 

■5. Minnie Huston Stephens Webb, Miss. 

o. Mis Lillian I'apcnoe Hall Laurens, Kansas. 

7. Laura Lam- liryan Charleston, >S C. 

cS. Mrs. Mary Lee brown Grauberry: Jaekson, Miss. 

9. MihS Florence T. bawton . Lstell, S. C. 

10. Eva M. Barnes.. Atlanta, Ga. 

11. Mrs. Aida Blaekbnrn Potter Galveston, Texas. 

12. Mrs Lois Beavers Johnson Indianapolis, liul. 

13. Mrs May Ophelia Hull Williams Baton Rouge, La. 

14. Herbert B. Moore =.... New York, N. Y. 

15. Mrs Jessie Kirkwood Faison Bennettsville, S. C. 

16. James Poyas Gibbs Charleston, S. C. 

17. Mason Chandler Brnnson Charleston, S. C. 

IS. George Williams Baeot. : Charleston, S. C. 

19. Miss Hariet Wainwright Baeot Charleston, S. C. 

20. Miss Julie linger Baeot Charleston. S. C. 

21. Miss Sarah Louise Baeot Charleston, S. C. 



The Historian was called on for his report, which 
was read and ordered spread on the minutes. 

There were no resignations, but the following deaths 
were reported : 

Mrs. Julia I v . Kendrick. 
Mrs. Z. P. Smith. 

The Treasurer's books were reported correctly kept 
and all vouched for the years 1911 and 1912. 

The Rev. W. H. S. Demarest, D. D, LL- J)., Presi- 
dent of Rutgers College, was called on to address the 
meeting, which he did very acceptably. 

An election was then entered into for new officers, 
and the old officers were elected to serve for the en- 
suing year. 

President, the Rev. Robert Wilson, 1). I). 

Vice-President for Charleston, vStephen Thomas. 

Vice-President for Purysburg, T. W. Bacot. 

Vice-President for New r Bordeaux, Charles P. Allston. 

Secretary and Treasurer, Dr. j. Bachman Chisolm. 

Historian, Win. G. Mazyck. 

Executive Committee: Arthur Mazyck, Dr. T. Grange 
Simons, Theodore G. Barker, Wm. C. Miller, and John 
B. Reeves. 

There being no further business the meeting was 
ordered adjourned, but before adjournment a delight- 
ful collation was served, which was greatly enjoyed. 

J. BACHMAN CHISOLM, Secretary. 



7 

STATEMENT. 
J. Bach man Chisolm, Treasurer. 



For year 1 *> 1 1 to 1912-April 15, 1911 to April 15, 1912. 
April, 19. 

To balance from last year... $356.97 

To members' dues from April 19, 1911 to April 15, 

1912 271.35 

To sale of Transactions for year 15.60 

To sale of pins for year 34.25 

To interest on 'permanent fund for year 13.56 

$691.73 

DISBURSEMENTS. 
1911, April 22. 
By Walker, Evans & Cogswell Co. Paid them balance 

due lor Transactions No. 17 £ 86.78 

By Dr. Robert Wilson. Paid his dues to the Hugue- 
not Society of America 5.00 

By South Carolina Society, for rent of hall 6.00 

By postage .... 30.00 

By expressage on book 1.00 

By paid News & Courier for advertising meeting 2.20 

By paid Walker, Evans & Cogswell Co., for tubes and 

letter file 3.25 

By paid Charleston livening Post for advertising meet- 
lug 1.00 

By paid for collation for Anniversary Meeting 35.00 

By paid U. S. Government for 500 envelopes .. 10.62 

By paid for typewriting 1. 10 

By paid for ten gold pins 37.50 

By paid Dr. Robert Wilson's dues to the Huguenot 

Society of London.. . 5 .25 

By paid J. B. Chisolm commissions for year..... 32.12 



BALANCE 

Pel inaneiii fund $347.92 

General fund 86.99 



S256..S2 



434.91 

S6 l »1.73 



Permanent fund on deposit at Charleston Savings Institution. 
General fund on deposit in the Miners & Merchants Bank, 



PRESIDENTS' ADDRESS. 



Ladies and Gentlemen of the Huguenot Society of South 
Carolina: 

Again we. have assembled at the recurring call of 
Nature's opening season of renewed life and hope, to 
unite in honorable commemoration of the new life of 
hope and earnest purpose that more than two centuries 
ago was quickening the heavy hearts of our forefathers, 
driven by the overwhelming Hood of persecution and 
the raging storms of political oppression from their 
happy and beloved ancestral hearths and hoines. 
And again, before congratulating ourselves upon the 
successful issue of our efforts to embalm their memories 
imperishably in the history of a new land whose unhewn 
forest, and untilled, but fecund soil had offered them its 
safe and rugged welcome from the ingratitude and 
blinded folly of their own sunny skies and fertile fields 
which had so cruelly cast them out, we would pause 
and linger for a little while upon their personalities, 
and the circumstances of their coining. And this we do 
in order that their records may be preserved not only 
in the coldness of historic pages and carven monuments, 
but in the warm, loving hearts and memories of our- 
selves and our children. We know that as a class, the 
Huguenot refugees were from the very nature of the 
case brave, true and purposeful, and worths' of all that 
we can do to honor their memories; we know further 
that their origin and development as a class was not 
local, but was the result of a selection, induced by the 
pressure of a common persecution operating for quite 
two centuries, from the best moral and religious ele- 
ments of the entire population of France, from every 
grade of social caste and rank. But we know also, 



from the testimony of their own writers, sneh as James 
Fontaine, the Giberts and others, that individually there 
were among them many evil and unworthy persons 
who were often fugitives from justice, and many weak 
and ignorant people who were restrained from lapsing 
and induced to leave their country less by the force of 
conviction and principle than by the influence of stronger 
minds, if not by less worthy reasons. Besides these, we 
must recognize still another element, brave and true 
and earnest a*s the best, refined in feeling and not un- 
educated, but accustomed by the circumstances of 
life, perhaps for generations, to a narrower horizon, and 
a more restricted activity of occupation than many 
of their fellow-exiles. Finally we must remember that 
when we think of them as French we are apt to have 
in mind a fixed composite type of nationality to which 
we unconsciously refer them all, forgetful that there 
were differences of racial extraction and even of minor 
points of religious faith, so that the common bond of 
persecution for conscience sake held in one brother- 
hood the Keltic Breton- and the fair haired Norman, 
the Flemish Walloon and the Southern Basque, the 
speakers of the "Langue d'oe" and of the "Fangued'oui," 
and even the Lutheran and the Calvinist and Congre- 
gationalism all differing in personal characteristics, in 
adaptation to the practical obligations of life and in 
their ideas of ecclesiastical polity and forms of worship, 
but all agreeing as one in their loyalty to the cause of 
religious liberty, and in hostility to what they devoutly 
believed to be corruptions of divine truth. I think 
that in these considerations we find the answer to the 
charge that is often brought against such organiza- 
tions as ours, that they resolve themselves into the 
glorification of a few prominent families, to the exclusion 
and oblivion of others who in the days of trial and 
martyrdom had equalled or excelled them in self-devotion 
and suffering for the truth's sake. The charge is unfair 
and untrue, and the apparent foundation for it is 



altogether misleading. It is the opprobrium —if that he 
the proper word for it -of all history that the few must 
represent the many, when but for the forgotten many 
the few would be equally unknown to posterity. The 
men who have gone by thousands into bloody unmarked 
graves to secure for their commanding general the 
palm of victory are forgotten while his name becomes a 
kind of patent of nobility and is trumpeted by fame 
over the world and through the ages. The founders of 
a nation hew the forest and till the soil which they 
wrest with the sacrinee of their lives from its savage- 
owners, leaving in the first rude houses which they 
have built the families whose descendants are to de- 
velop its resources and make the nueleus of its popu- 
lation. But only the chosen representative few who 
organize a government and make and administer its 
laws leave any record which may crystallize into 
history. And it is from the recorded stories of that few 
that all our history must be made. It is the prime 
object that all our historical societies and our Hugue- 
not Societies are purely historical —to collect and 
publish and emphasize these stories so as to learn 
from them the life history of the unrecorded many, and 
so to seeure to them the honor that is their due, res- 
cuing from oblivion their names and worthy deeds 
and enshrining their memories in enduring records. 
And this saered duty our historical soeieties are doing 
faithfully and well; so that every humble builder of the 
commonwealth, however obscure and modest his r«'»le in 
life, if he did good work in his allotted place and illus- 
trated in his individuality those qualities of true and 
manly character which have been strong enough to 
influence for good through the power of heredity, the 
individualities and environment of remote posterity, 
may be represented -and is represented, in name and 
in character upon our list of membership. 

As to our own reeords of work and growth during 
the year just passed, 1 am happy to report that we have 



1 1 



cause only for encouragement which should stimulate 
us to increased zeal and activity. We are one of the 
only three independent and original Huguenot Socie- 
ties — indeed, so far as I know the only three Huguenot 
Societies in existence, and in some respects, most notably, 
financially- we are the feeblest of the sisterhood and 
are certainly more hampered by a scattered, though 
large and fast increasing membership, and by our 
limited field of research, than either the Society of 
America or that of London. But we are far from 
being the Cinderella of the family, although it is a 
fact that during the past year a —no, he was not a 
prince, but he was a very good fellow -from one of 
the great Universities of the country, came seeking 
material for a Ph. D. degree Thesis on the Huguenots 
of South Carolina, and the glass slipper fitted our 
foot. Owing to unavoidable causes which have been 
explained elsewhere, our last publication of Transac- 
tions was sadly belated and lacks its usual variety, 
but its single historical contribution was of interest 
and value sufficient to make amends for its deficiencies. 

Our gain in membership has been larger than usual, 
35 in all and has come from every section of the Union, 
bringing us well on the way to the 500 mark. We 
have suffered the loss by death of two of our valued 
members, in addition to those registered below, and by 
resignation, of none. Owing to the delayed issue of 
our last volume of Transactions the names of our 
deceased fellow members for this year appear with 
last year's record. 

The additional deaths are: Mrs Julia L. Kendrick 
and Mrs Z. P. Smith. 

1 thank you for your courteous attention. 



12 



REPORT OF HISTORIAN 



A list of Pamphlets, Magazines, and other Periodi- 
cals received from Societies and individuals for the 
Huguenot Society of South Carolina. 

1. The vState Historical Society of Missouri. The 
Missouri Historical Review, Vol. 5, No. 3, April, 1911; 
Vol. 5, No. 4, July, 1911; Vol. 6, No. 2. 

2. Pennsylvania Historical Society. The Pennsyl- 
vania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 35, 
No. 137, Jan., 1911; Vol. 35, No. 138, April, 1911; 
Vol. 35, No. 140, Oct., 1911; Vol. 36, No. 141, January, 
1911; Vol. 35, No. 139, July, 191 I. 

3. South Carolina Historical Society. The South 
Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Vol. 
12, No. 2, April, 1911; Vol. 12, No. 3, July, 1911; Vol. 
12, No. 4, October, 1911; Vol. 13, No. 1, January, 1912. 

4. The Huguenot Society of London, Vol. IS, 
Denization and Naturalization of Persons in England 
and Ireland. By-laws and list of Fellows, 1911, Vol. 
9, No. 3, 1911. 

5. A list of Genealogies in the Syracuse Public 
Library, Syracuse, N. V. 

0. Pornvaunen, 1910, by Kmil Kkhoff. 

7. Ihnversity of California. Expedition of San 
Francisco Bay, in 1711). Diary of Pedro Rayes, by 
H. K. Bolton. The Portalo Expedition of 1769 to 
1770. Diary of Vincente Vila, January, 1911. Diary 
of Fry Narcis Duin. 

8. Historical Society of the State of Wisconsin. 
The Chattanooga Campaign. Wisconsin Women in 
the War. Bibliography of Wisconsin in the War, by 
Bradley. 



13 

9 Smithsonian Institution. Annual Report of 
American Historical Association, 1908, Vol. 2. Annual 
Report of American Historical Association, Vol. 2, 
No. 2. Annual Report of American Historical Asso- 
ciation, 1909. 

10. University Press. Publishers of the American 
Pacific Port History. The Portola Expedition of 
1769 to 1770. Diary of Miguel Castano. 

11. Library of Congress. Van Buren Papers. 
Report of 1911. 

12. Aaitikvarisk Tidskrift for Scvridge, by Emil 
Kkhoff , ' vStockholm. 

13. Kansas State Historical Society, report of 1909- 
1910. Report of Meeting, Decembers, 1911. 

14. North Carolina Historical Society. The James 
vSprunt Historical Publications, two pamphlets. 

15. Bowdoin College. Bulletin, Dec, 1911, No. 
38'. Obituary, 1909 to 1910, No. 33, Feb., 1911. 

16. Historical Department of Iowa. Annals of Iowa 
Vol. 14, No. cX, Jan., 1911; Vol. 10, No. 19, 1911. 

17 Maine Genealogical Society. Reports, Jan. 15, 
1911. 

18. The Spanish Settlements in Florida, by Wood- 
bery Rowley, two volumes. 

Respectfully submitted. 

\YM. G. MAZYCK, Librarian. 
April 15, 1912. 



THE FRENCH PROTESTANTS OF ABBEVILLE 

DISTRICT, S. C. 
1701-1765 



From "The Sainsbury Papers" 



MEMORIAL OF PASTOR JEAN LOUIS GIBERT 

TO THE LORDS OF THE TREASURY 

READ IN COUNCIL, 6 JULY, 1763. 



(By Permission oi' the South Carolina Historical Society) 

Aux Seigneurs de la Tresorie: 

Le Soussigne Jean Louis Gibert, Pasteur, a i'hon- 
neur de representer a L. L E. E. les Seigneurs qui 
composent le Bureau de la Tresorie, 1° Qu'ensuite des 
assurances gradeuses qu'il recut de Sa Majeste il y a 
environ deux ans, au sujet de r£tablissement d'une 
Colonie pendant son sejour parmi les Protestants per- 
secutes en France, il en a engage un grand nonibre a 
le suivre pour former des etablissemens dans [quelc'une] 
des terres d'Ainerique sous le Gouvernemeiit de Sa 
Majeste, et qu'il est siir qu'il n'exagere point en assurant 
que plus de six mille d'entr'eiix sont determines a 
prendre ce parti, surtout si I'ou donno de L f encourage- 
ment a ceux cjiii font la premiere tentative. One le 
nombre de ceux qui lui out donne parole positive pour 
s'embarquer a tout evenement au premier moment 
favorable est de plus de quatre cent, dont deux cent 
sont etre actuellement pret a partir, et le reste s'achemi- 
nera par la Hollande ou par telle autre voye qui leur 
paroitra la moins perilleuse. 

Que c'est au nom de ce nombre de personnes qui lui 
sont connues, et qui tons sont gens craignant Dieu et 
d'une probite non suspecte, dont quelques uns meme 



laissent ties biens considerables en France, cju'il a pris 
la liberte de demander a Sa Majeste Irente milles de 
Terrein en quarre dans lequel ils se proposent de vivre 
tous ensembles et de s'appliquer prineipalemenl a la 
culture de vignes et des vefs-a-soye, ainsi qu'aux autres 
parties de i'agriculture dont le terrein qu'on leur 
assignera sera le plus susceptible. 

Que quoiqu'il paroisse a l'abord qu'une pareille 
etendue de terrein soil trop grande en egard au norabre 
present des colons il est sortout calcule a dessein de 
pouvoir fourni plus surement et plus Commodemeut des 
terres a ceux. qui, encourages par le sucees des premiers, 
pourroient les aller joindre dans la suite, D'ailleurs 
[les mesurages de ce terres n'empechera pas qu'elles 
ne retourneront] d'elles memes a la disposition de la 
Couronne, si quelque accident imprevu empechoit 
qu'elles ne pussent etre dei'riehees dans un certain 
terns. 

One comme M. Jenkinson a fait entendre au dit 
Gibert qu'il etoit inutile cju'il demanda d'autres terres 
que dans la Caroline il est tres dispose a s'en contenter, 
mais il ne peut s'L-mpeehcr d'observer en meme terns 
que le climat etant si chaud le Gouvernement ne re- 
tirera pas d'aussi grands ni d'aussi prompts avantages 
de la culture des vignes et des Muriers qu'on auroit 
pu s'en promettre dans un climat un peu plus froid tel 
que le sorit les Rives de l'Ohio sur lesquelles il avoit 
d'abord porte ses vues. Ou'enlin puisque la chose 
convient sans doute mieux sur ce pied aux vues du 
Ministre, il prend douc la liberte de demander, qu'on 
lui assigne, qu'on mesure, et qu'on donne les ordres 
les plus efficaces, pour que sa Colonic soit rnise en pos- 
session, des le moment de son arrivee; de trente milles 
en quarre de terrein, sur la Rive Orientale de la Riviere 
Savannah, a choisir entre la ville de Purisburg et le 
Fort Moore. 

Pour que de ces trente milles en quarre il en soit 



1 6 



mesure trent milk acres pour le Township de la Ville 
cju'ils se proposent de batir sans aiicun retard ou delai. 

Que pour prevenir tons les malheurses inconveniens 
auxquels la Colonic de Purisbourg et celles des Vaudois 
en Georgie out ete exposes qui out entraine la mine 
presque totale de ces deux etablisseinens naissans (du 
moins s'y le raport qu'on en a fait an (lit Gibert est vrai ) 
le ties humble supliant prend la liberie* d'insister sur 
les conditions suivantes, qu'il est de l'interest de Sa 
Majeste et du Gouvernement de lui accorder. 

Que vSa Majeste ait la bonte de faire partir avec le 
premier transport des Colons qui vont etre pr&ts a 
s'embarquer, un Arpenteur titre autorise par Sa Majeste 
rneme pour faire le mesurage des trente milles en 
quarre, des I'instant menie, auquel le (lit quarre aura 
ete choici par le dit Gibert et sa Colonic, en sort qu'on 
ne mette aucun intervalle entre la'marque ou designa- 
tion du terrein et le mesurage meme, et que le dit 
Arpenteur ne quitte point la place que le dit mesurage 
ne soit entierement effectue. 

Que Monsieur le Gouverneur de la Caroline fasse 
publier dans tous les lieux de sa dependance que les 
terres que le Gouvernement aura une fois marquee et 
trouve a propos d'accorder [sont leur Proprietaires, les 
quels en out pris possession,] qu'ainsi il est deffendu a 
qui que ce soit de s'en faire mesurer ou assigncr dans le 
dit District. 

Que pour plus de surete, Monsieur le Gouverneur 
de la Caroline ait ordre de faire enregistrer dans le 
Registre du Surveyor General de Charlestown, le 
mesurage des terres en question, dans l'espace de six 
semaines apres que le dit mesurage aura ete iini, et 
qu'un acte soit donne an dit Gibert [pour] lequel il 
puisse faire voir que le dit enregistrement a ete fait. 

Qu'un autre acte soit expedie, an dit Gibert ou a 
sa Colonie par lequel ils sont mis en possession des trente 
milles de terrein en quarre sus-dit, a titre de freehold, 
avec exemption de tout iuipot quelconque pendant dix 



17 

annees de tout ce dont la Colonic prendra possession 
immcdiatement, an bout de quel ternie les terres pos- 
sedees et defriehees payeront les memes droits aux 
quels toutes les terres sous la domination de Sa Majeste 
sont sujettes, et que par report aux terres qui ne 
pourront pas etre occupees d'abord, leur franchise 
d'impot pendant dix ans devra etre Comptee du 
moment auquel chaque nouveau Colon en aura etc mis 
en possession. 

Que comrne*Sa Majeste, s'est relaehee du droit sur 
les negres en faveur des habitans de la Caroline, a 
condition qu'ils fournissent lc transport et un an de 
vivre aux nouvcaux colons que Sa Majeste pourroit 
envoyer dans le pais: le dit Gibert et sa Colonic esperent 
de jouir de ce benefice; Mais que pour eviter toute dis- 
cussion desagreable a ce sujet avcc les anciens habi- 
tans, ce qui est presque inevitable, ils attendant de 
la bonte de Sa Majeste qu'elle assignera a chaque 
colon, tant en argent, a ])rendre sur la caisse du negro 
duty, avcc quelle somme, les nouvcaux colons pour- 
voiront eux-rnemes tant a leur transport sur le lieu 
de leur destination, qu'a leur propre nourriture pendant 
l'annee susditte a la quelle les terres n'auront encor 
rien rendu. 

Que v Sa Majeste fera choisir parmi les colons prets 
a partir un corps de Juges a paix un Conseil qui 
pourront decider de toutes sortes de matieres tant 
eiviles qu' eelesiastiques et ineine criminelles jusqu'a 
la' concurrence de eertaines sommes on des certains 
delits, le tout suiyant les loix de la Grande Bretagne, 
reservant les causes considerables et d'une certaine 
importance pour etre counties par le Gouverneur de 
Sa Majeste residant a. Charlestown. 

Qu'enfin comme le moindre retard dans le mesurage 
et la prise de possession des terres accordees par Sa 
Majeste est infailliblement la mine d'une Colonie; 
le dit Gibert suplie les Seigneurs de la Tresorie de faire 
parvenir an Gouverneur de la Caroline on autres 



i8 



officicrs de Sa Majeste les brdres les plus formels et les 
plus peremptoires de se conformer incessament aux 
ordres de vSa Majeste sur tons les objest exposes ey- 
dessus, leur enjoignant de se mettre en etat d'en accuser 
1'execution a Sa Majeste au boul d'un certain terme, 
sans objections ni difficulte quelconque, et leur declarant 
que tout delai a cet egard encourra ipso facto I'indig- 
nation de Sa Majeste. 

TEAN LOUIS GIBERT. 



TRANSLATION. 

To the Lords of the Treasury : 

The undersigned, Jean Louis Gibert, Pastor, has the 
honor of showing to L. I/. K. K. the Lords composing the 
Treasury Bureau, 1st That after the gracious assurances 
which he received from His Majesty about two years 
ago, in regard to the establishment of a Colony during 
his sojourn among the Protestants persecuted in France, 
he has secured a large number to follow him for the 
forming of settlements in some one of the territories 
of America, under Mis Majesty's Government, and 
that he is sure he does not exaggerate in asserting that 
more than six thousand of them are determined to 
take -pari in the matter, especially if assured of en- 
couragement to those who make the first venture. 
That the number of those who have given a positive 
promise to embark, under any circumstances, at the 
first favorable moment is more than four hundred, 
of whom two hundred are actually ready to leave, and 
the rest will go by way of Holland, or by any other 
route that may seem to them less dangerous. 

That it is in the name of that number of persons, 
who are known by him and who are all God-fearing 
people, and of undoubted probity, some of whom are 



19 

leaving considerable property in France, that he has 
taken the liberty of asking His Majesty for thirty 
square miles of 'land, on which they propose to live all 
together and to apply themselves chiefly to the culture 

of vines and silk-worms and also to such other depart- 
ments of agriculture as may seem most adapted to t In- 
lands assigned to them. 

That although it may seem at first that so great an 
extent of land may be too great in proportion to the 
present number of colonists, he has been particular to 
make his calculation so as to make sure of being able 
to furnish,- with greater certainty and convenience, 
land to those who, encouraged by the success of the 
first-comers, may be able to follow and join them. 
Besides, the surveying of these lands will not prevent 
their being returned to the custody of the Crown, 
should any unforeseen accident prevent their being 
cleared within a given time. 

That as M. Jenkinson has made known to the said 
Gibert that it would be useless for him to ask for lands 
elsewhere than in Carolina, he is quite disposed to be 
satisfied with that, but he cannot help observing, at 
the same time, that the climate being so warm the 
Government will not obtain so great or so. prompt 
returns from the culture of vines and mulberry trees 
as it would have been able to promise itself in a climate 
somewhat colder, such as prevails on the banks of the 
Ohio, upon which lie had at first set his mind. That 
finally since the matter is without doubt better suited 
to the views of the Ministry upon this basis, he there- 
fore takes the liberty of asking that they confirm the 
grant to him, have the surveys made, and issue the 
strictest orders, in order that his Colony may be put 
in possession from the moment of its arrival, of thirty 
square miles of land on the east bank of the Savannah 
River, as may be chosen between the town of Purisburg 
and Fort Moore. 

However, of these thirty square miles there should 



be laid off thirty thousand acres for the Township of 
the town which they propose to build, without any 
dilatoriness or delay. 

That in order to prevent the unfortunate mishaps to 
which the Colony of Purisburg and those of the Vandois 
in Georgia have been exposed (and ) which have brought 
about the almost total ruin of those two infant establish 
incuts, (at least if the report that has been made to 
the said Gibert be true) the very humble petitioner 
takes the 'liberty of insisting upon the following con- 
ditions which it is to the interest of His Majesty and 
the Government to accord him. 

That His Majesty shall have the goodness to send out 
with the first transport of Colonists who shall be ready 
to embark a commissioned surveyor, authorized by 
His Majesty himself to make the measurements of 
the thirty square miles from the very moment at 
which the said tract shall have been chosen by the 
said Gibert and his Colony, in order that no interval 
may elapse between the mark or designation of the 
tract and its actual survey, and that the said surveyor 
shall not quit the place until the said measurements 
shall have been entirely completed. 

That Monsieur, the Governor of Carolina, shall 
cause to be published in every part of his jurisdiction 
that the lands which the Government shall have once 
marked out and seen lit to grant, and of which the 
Proprietors have taken possession, it has also forbidden 
to any one else whosoever to survey or grant in the 
said district. 

That for greater security Monsieur, the Governor 
of Carolina, shall cause to be registered in the Register 
of the Surveyor General of Charlestown the measure- 
ments of the lands in question within six weeks after 
the said measurement shall have been finished, and that 
a title shall be given to the said Gibert (by) which he 
may be able to show that the said registration has 
been made. 



That another title shall be executed to the said 
Gibert or to his Colony, by which they are put in pos- 
session of thirty square miles of land above mentioned, 
in free-hold title, with exemption from all taxes what- 
soever for ten years of all of which the Colony shall 
take immediate possession, at the end of which term 
the lands settled and cleared will pay the same assess- 
ments to which all lands under the control of His 
Majesty are subject, and that in regard to the other 
tracts which 'could not be occupied at first, their ex- 
emption from tax for ten years ought to be counted from 
the moment when each new colonist shall have been 
put in possession. 

That His Majesty having remitted the duty upon 
negroes in favor of the inhabitants of Carolina, on con- 
dition that they furnish transportation and one year 
of maintenance to the new Colonists whom His Majesty 
may send into the country: the said Gibert and his 
Colony hope to enjoy this benefit; but, in order to avoid 
all unpleasant discussion on this subject with the old 
inhabitants, which is almost inevitable, they expect 
of the bounty of His Majesty, that he will assign to 
each Colonist as much in money as will equal the 
negro duty, with which sum the new Colonists will 
themselves provide transportation to their place of 
destination as well as their own maintenance during 
the above mentioned year in which the land will have 
not yet yielded anything. 

That His Majesty will cause to be chosen from among 
the colonists ready to depart a corps of Justices of 
the Peace and a council which will be able to settle 
all kinds of matters, civil as well as ecclesiastical, and 
even criminal, to the extent of certain amounts or of 
certain offenses, all in accordance with the laws of 
Great Britain, reserving the greater and more important 
causes to be considered by His Majesty's Governor, 
resident in Charlestown. 



22 



That finally, since the least delay in surveying and 

taking possession of the lands granted by His Majesty, 
is infallibly the ruin of a Colony, the said Gibert prays 
the Lords of the Treasury to have issued to the Governor 
of Carolina, or other of His Majesty's officers, the most 
formal and peremptory orders to carry out immediately 
the orders of Mis Majesty upon all the matters herein 
above presented, enjoining l hem to put themselves 
in condition to report their execution to His Majesty 
by a certain fixed time without any objection or diffi- 
culty whatsoever and warning them that any delay 
in this respect will incur, ipso facto, His Majesty's 
displeasure. 

. JEAN [,OUISGIBBRT. 



The above memorial has been given in full not only 
on account of its great intrinsic interest, but because of 
the strong light which it throws upon the character of 
Pastor Gibert, and his eminent fitness to be the leader 
and head of a Colony such as that which he eoniklenth 
expected to establish. The paper shows that he had 
given careful study to the whole subject, foreseeing 
all the probable difficulties of the venture, and with 
sound judgment devising in detail the methods by which 
they might be overcome, while the confidence which 
he shows in their success and the frank boldness with 
which he urges his plans upon the Government are 
thoroughly eharaetcrsitie of the man. That the me- 
morial, although read with respect in the Council, was 
not taken as seriously as he had hoped it would be, 
does not seem to have discouraged, although it must 
have disappointed him. The number of colonists which 
he counted on was not forthcoming, only 183 being- 
mustered at Plymouth for the voyage to Carolina. 
The larger number of those expected preferred being 



23 

sent to Kast Florida, though it is not clear that any of 
them went there. Gibert's proposed plans were greatly 
modified, and the amount of land asked for very much 
redueed. On their arrival in Carolina Governor Hull 
appears to have ignored Gibert's suggestions, but 
the eolonists were well treated and provided for, being 
finally settled at Long Canes, near Ninety-Six, in what 
was later called Abbeville District. The name of New 
Bordeaux was given to their little town and £500 granted 
to supply tools and other requisites, dissensions, how- 
ever, arose among the little band of exiles, and a num- 
ber of them withdrew from the Long Canes settlement 
and were removed at the Government's expense to 
Purysburg, on the Savannah River. 

A very full account of the whole matter may be 
found in No. 5 of the Transaetions of the Society. 



24 



LIST OF SOUTH CAROLINA NAMES IN THE 

PARISH REGISTERS OF THE FRENCH 

CHURCHES AT BRISTOL, STONEHOUSE 

AND PLYMOUTH AND THAT OF 

THE FRENCH CHURCH AT 

THORP E-LE -SO K EN, 

ENGLAND. 

(From Vol. XX. Publications o( che Huguenot Society of London / 

Those marked * are believed to be extinct in South 
Carolina, or occurring now only as Christian names. 
Those marked f have not been found in any other 
Lists or Registers. The spelling is various, but is 
given as in the Registers. 



*Arnaud (Arnault, Arnauld ) from Xaintonge, 1701- 
1757. 

Avery (Aivri ) 1778. 

Beaushamp, Paris, 1 687. 

Bellin (Belin.) 1693. 

Bardin, Village de Bardin en Angenois, 1693. 

Benoist, (Benoit, Benoitt) de la Chagnee en Poitou, 
1678-1733. 

*Berrenger, 1773. 

*-Bortraiui, Xaintonge, 1673-1790, 

*Boisseau, 1703. 

Bonneau (Bonnau, Bonuaud), 1720. 

Boyd, Judith (Scottish settlers in Paris), 1668. 

Cormier, 1745. 

Cousturier (Couturier), Les Roehes de Meche, Xain- 
tonge, 1698-1734. 

*Delaage, 1695. 

Devineau (Devigneaux), 1724-1744. 

*Doussain, (Douxsaint) 1733-1735. 



Dufor, 1748; (l)u Four, Du Port), De Guynes 

gouvernor de Calais, 1688-1706. 

Du Puy, de St. Pierre en Oievou, 1688-1700. 

Durand, St. Martyn, L 693-171 5. 

Duval, 1737-1758. 

Fontaine, 1686. 

De la Fontaine, Fontenay au Brie, 1696. 

*Freneau, (Fresneau), 1728-1737. 

Gaillard, Musson en Xaintonge, 1692-1708. 

*Gandron, (Gendron, Jandron) 1722-1756. 

*Garnier, 1722-1758. 

Gerard, 1728. 

Gill, 1704. 

Girard, Royon en Xaintonge, 1 7 ( >4 1728. 

Gregorie (Gregory), 1694. 

*Guerin, 1694-1722. 

*Guiton (Giton), 1694-1706. 

fGignard, 1690. 

Horry, 1733-1736. 

Jaudon, Soubise, 1700. 

Laborde, 1702. 

La Motte, 1706; (marries Louise Couturier). 

La Roche, Languedoe, 1706. 

*Le Fefebre ( Le Febre, Lefbure), de la Paroise de 
Jendrin, 1691: 

Le Gendre, 1686. 

Le Chi (Legere j, 1694. 

Lucas., Grand -Brcuil, Porton, 1691-1747. 

*Marbeuf (La Brosse, La Bruce), St. Christophe, 
1719. 

Martin, 1734. 

Maury, 1700. 

*Mercier, La Rochelle, 1700-1703. 

*Mignot, Jarree en Ounis, 1689. 

Motte, La, 1765. 

Page, 1693-1736. 

Petit, 1693. 

Porcher, de Marehe noir au pays Gaulois, 1689. < 



26 



*Prevost, Chatain Saintonge, 1702-1722. 

fRaoul, (Raoult) St. Pierre de melle en Poitou, 1695- 

711. 
*Roux, 1704. 
*Royer, 1696-1754. 

Surau (Sureau, Surreau, Surro) 1694. 
ffavaud, 1699. 
Tessier, 1700-1704. 
Thomas, 1.691-1736. 
t*Videau, de la Tremblade, 1699. 



The above list has been given because of its his- 
torical interest, notwithstanding its fragmentary char- 
acter. It shows that some names usually regarded as 
strictly English were either originally French or had 
long since become common in France, such as Page, 
Lucas, Avery, Gill, Martin, Thomas. Gregory and 
Boyd, both Scotch 1 , belong to the latter class; In 
Lefevre the variations "Lefebre" and "Lefebure" show, 
the first the similarity (as in Spanish,; of the labials 
b and v; the second, the easy mistake of reading u 
for v, the latter form being generally used for both 
letters. We learn also that many families emigrating 
to South Carolina before 1700, left members or branches 
settled permanently in -England, the La Ivlotte's, for 
instance being found from 1706 to 1765, and the Ber- 
reiigiTs until 177S. Many of the Horry family settled 
in different counties in England. A coat of arms 
on a piece of Horry silver has been found to be 
identical, even to crest and motto, with the arms of 
Harris of Exeter. This fact is of curious interest 
when we remember that a Frenchman would pronounce 
these names exactly alike. Were these Exeter Harrises 
Anglicized Huguenot Horry's? 

The familiar names of Raoul, Gnignard and Videau 
are found in no other Registers or Lists. The well- 
known Couturier family in found to have come from 



27 

"the Rocks" of Meche in Saintonge. The origin of 
this family in South Carolina has been very obscure. 
The "Sieur Couturier" arrived in Charleston, in 1723, 
and was immediately arrested and imprisoned by (;ov. 
Nicholson because he had come without a passport 
from the Roman Catholic Colon) of Mobile. He 
appealed to the Board of Trade and his release was 
promptly ordered, without reason assigned, evidently 
being known in England. It is very significant that 
we find Paul Couturier and Isaac Videan, among others, 
abjuring the Old Religion, and being received into the 
Reformed Church at Stonehouse, in 169° and 1700. 

Quite a number of the names in these Registers 
belong to families known in South Carolina only as 
Roman Catholics. We find many instances of this 
division of households even, in the case of almost 
every Huguenot family in South Carolina. 

R. YV. 

The following copy of an Address on " Huguenots in 

America" (which was kindly given by its learned 
author to a member of this Society not long since] 
is so very interesting and valuable as to command publi- 
cation in the Transactions of the Society: 

HUGUENOTS IN AMERICA 

It is no part of my object to tell the story of French 
Protestantism at home, or describe the atrocities which 
nominally extirpated it and tilled Europe and America 
with ruined or half ruined exiles, nor to detail the abortive 
attempts at Huguenot colonization outside the United 
States. But a few connecting links on this subject 
must be interspersed without which my special subject 
would be scarcely intelligible. Two introductory ob- 
servations must be made concerning the character of 
French Protestantism and its votaries which are worth 
noting. 



28 



In the first place, a vital incident of its career to 
which it owed its rise and its subversion, its strength 
and its weakness, which made its extirpation so inju- 
rious to France both by facilitating flight and by the 
character of the industries crippled, and which corres- 
pondingly enriched the countries which afforded an 
asylum, was, that it was essentially a trader's religion, 
not an agricultural one. Its strongest seats formed a 
girdle around the Atlantic and Mediterranean seaboards 
of France, the overwhelming mass of its members dwelt 
in the maritime provinces from Picardy to Guienne 
and in I v anguedoc, and along the great rivers which 
formed part of the ocean waterway. 

This does not mean that the Reformed faith had not 
many temples and many devotees in every part of the 
Kingdom, in Champagne, in Berri, in Dauphine, in 
Lorraine, in the Cevennes, which sheltered many 
thousands after the Revocation. The Huguenots ex- 
isted in such numbers that every province was dis- 
organized to its depth by the persecution and the flight, 
and every road had to be guarded and prowled over by 
dragoons and priests and bloodthirsty spies. Nor 
does this mean that the agricultural part was not a 
majority and a large majority of its membership; as 
of course even the seaboard pioneers were chiefly in- 
habited by farmers; but the leadership lay with the 
stirring and daring traders of the seaport towns and 
the cities of inland trade, its life blood was the quick 
circulation of new ideas in the commercial cities except 
along the borders of Switzerland and Savory, and the 
agricultural portion was mainly such as came in close 
constant contact with the commercial portion. The 
mass of the inland peasantry, ignorant and slow, 
remained stolidly faithful to Catholicism; so that the 
contest between the two religions in France was in 
part a sectional as well as a religious struggle, and was 
greatly aggravated by the invariable jealousy of the 
agricultural toward the mercantile classes. To the 



29 

Catholic peasantry, we may be sure that the Huguenots 
were not only heretics, but whatever may have been 
the equiyalent for "goldbugs" and "bondholders" and 
"speculators" ; they were regarded as the men of Ken- 
tucky used to regard the men of Massachusetts. And 
this fact, which made the Huguenots the intellectual 
and spiritual flower of France, made also their weak- 
ness when the Crown and the higher nobility (many of 
whom espoused their cause during the civil wars, 
and under the Edict, giving a fleeting encouragement 
which was fatally misleading) resolved on their extir- 
pation; they were a local minority, and distrusted by 
the brute body of the nation. But again, this locali- 
zation on the seaboard was precisely what made a 
vast exodus possible in the truth of Stern prohibitions 
and terrible penalties mercilessly enforced and set 
again, every Huguenot lost to the Kingdom outweighed 
ten farmers in importance to its vitality and in value 
to the countries which welcomed them. 

The second point is and ludicrously obvious as it 
is when stated, most people in fact overlook it that 
the Protestant Frenchman was a Frenchman just the 
same, his new religion did not change his Celtic blood 
and nature. We are prone to think of him as a French 
Puritan, substantially identical with the English Puri- 
tan; as a fact, he was not essentially different from a 
Catholic Frenchman, except that he averaged higher, 
and he hail no kinship with the brood of Knox and 
Melville, Vane and Cromwell, except that of high 
religious fervor and ideals. He had the warm blood, 
the sunny, bouyant disposition, and the love of beauty 
of his race; and while one must not even seem ungracious 
to a class who endured so much and sacrificed so much 
for their faith* (having to withstand far bitterer trials 
than any ever imposed on their Saxon co-religionists), 
it is reasonably correct to say that they were somewhat 
less judicious in organizing resistance, or in calculating 
the chances before it, and somewhat less energetic in 



3° 

maintaining that resistance afterward, than the Ten 
tonic nations. 

There is no instance of the total uprooting of Protes- 
tantism in a considerable Teutonic State; and it i^ a 
familiar fact that the French-speaking Netherlands 
were the first to revolt against Spain, and the Dutch 
provinces the only ones that held out, In thi^ country, 
whenever any contest arose between French and English 
settlers, the former invariably went to the wall: they 
make much the more agreeable figure of the two far 
less grasping" and selfish and far more anxious for 
social unity, —we sympathize with them from their 
superior qualities as neighbors and ornaments of so- 
ciety—but their opponents walk off with the cake. 
And when a French community comes in contact with 
a Teutonic one, the former boon loses its identity 
and its language and becomes at last only a modifying 
strain in a Teutonic body, even when the latter has 
little or no advantage of numbers. The French about 
New York were rapidly merged in the Dutch, and those 
of South Carolina in the English. The same traits 
may without much imagination be traced in their 
descendants; it is notorious that South Carolina, in 
whose early settlement the Huguenot blood was a 
leading factor, was the promptest and finest in action 
of any of the Southern States, and was the leader in the 
secession movement by virtue of such instant energy ; 
sonic distinguished foreign writers go so far as to sav 
that but for South Carolina that movement would 
never have materialized into the Confederacy. And 
finally, these qualities help to explain why the French 
have never founded a stable state outside their birth- 
place, or a permanent colony of any importance, like 
the Norse ancestors of the Norman French, they have 
overthrown states, they have entered as a most valua- 
ble factor into the composition of states, but they seem 
to lack some substantive qualities essential to self- 
perpetuating communities. 



3i 

The Huguenot settlements in the New World divide 
themselves into two classes, different in their origin 
and aspirations, but not in results; namely those of 
choice and those of neeessity. The line between the 
two is about the middle of the Seventeenth Century 
the beginning of the intensified persecutions that 
prefaced the dragonnades and the Revocation. The 
former were deliberate organized colonizations; the 
latter were the desperate resource of a disorganized 
mob of hunted 'exiles seeking an asylum. The former 
sought wealth and new seats for their church, and often 
dreamed of .a Huguenot State; the latter sought only 
life and bread and freedom of worship, and were only 
too glad to melt into such communities as would let 
them. The former were soon suppressed, absorbed, 
or extirpated; the latter expected nothing, and received 
it. The former include the abortive attempts in Brazil, 
South Carolina, and Florida, and the earliest settle- 
ments in Arcadia and Canada till the Jesuits gained 
control, the French-Dutch colonization of New York, 
and the thrifty settlements on some of the West India 
islands; the latter include the feeble attempts to es- 
tablish themselves in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and 
Connecticut, the Hood of new accessions to the French 
element in New York and its vicinity, the settlements 
in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia, 
and greatest of all, the tide of immigrants that created 
South Carolina. 

Curiously though, the earliest of these attempts were 
helped forward with active zeal by the Crown and the 
Catholic leaders in France, who afterwards so sternly 
repressed them, the reason being partly that they 
were not estensibly Protestant movements, but expe- 
ditions to wrest the monopoly of the New World from 
Spain and Portugal, attuning all classes by the vision 
of glory, of fortunes for the adventurers, of funds for 
the always empty treasury, of the remission of taxes; 
partly that the prospect of draining too the disturbing" 



3 2 

Protestant elements so far that they would never come 
baek seems to have rather pleased the Catholic states- 
men at this time, when savage hate and bloodthirsty 
bigotry had not yet driven all statesmen-like considera- 
tion of poliey out of their minds. Francis I had indeed 
tried a little gentle compulsion cm tin- Protestants, 
butchering the inhabitants of twenty-two villages and 
burning fourteen persons at the stake in 1545; and under 
Henry II laws of extreme severity were enacted for 
punishing heretics and confiscating their property. 
But the illustrious Coligny, not yet an avowed Protest- 
ant, \yas now in power, and conceived the plan of a 
religious asylum in the New World, nearly three-quar- 
ters of a century before the landing of the Pilgrims; and 
in 1555 a memorable year, that in which the first Protest- 
ant church in France was organized in Paris, and in 
which Charles V abdicated the Imperial Crown, he 
found an apparently ideal instrument in one of the most 
remarkable and characteristic products of the Middle 
Ages/ 

Nicholas Durand de Ville-Gaguou was one whom, if 
the doctrines of Pythagoras could be credited ever so 
little, we should believe to be Alcibiad.es born again in 
a Sixteenth- Century body. Me was a typical Frenchman 
in brilliancy, versatility, vanity, and caprice; with as 
splendid abilities and as worthless a character as could 
easily be found even in an age of mature talents and 
embryonic morality; a magnificent soldier and mariner, 
dauntless in courage, exhaustless in resources, a reputed 
scholar and a redoubtable polemic, a persuasive orator 
and a seductive writer; but as ambitious, proud, vain, 
domineering, and intractable as Frontenac and as 
selfish as La vSalle, with as little fixedness of princi- 
ple or opinion as a weathercock, an intriguer and a liar. 
He bred and carried on feuds till even he seems to have 
tired of them, and finally conceived t^or derived from 
Coligny ) the idea of founding" a French State in Brazil. 
Some time before this he had blossomed out as a Protest- 



33 

ant, apparently more for the sake of reveling in debate 
with and abuse of monks and priests, than for any better 
reason, though sheer caprice had probably much to 
do with it; and he now played a double-faced game 
with both the Huguenots and the Catholic's, enticing 
the former by the hope of a refuge and a fret- Protestant 
state, and the latter by that of glory, booty, and getting 
rid of the Huguenots. He led an expedition of both 
seets to the harbor of the later Rio Janeiro, in 1555, 
which shortly received a strong Huguenot reinforce- 
ment; fought with the ministers, recanted his Protest- 
antism, began a frightful persecution of the Huguenots, 
murdered some, marooned others, and finally sailed 
for France, and left the rest to be butchered by the 
Portuguese or take refuge among the Indians. 

Four years later Colingy made another attempt, 
dispatching an expedition to the North American 
coast under command of a brave and capable seaman, 
Jean Ribault. The colony, like nearly all early colo- 
nies, was to be a trading settlement and a reservoir of 
supplies for the mother country, not a self-sufficing 
community of agriculturists. The dreadful story that 
follows, one of the bloodiest episodes even of the Mid- 
dle Ages, we can only outlive. A settlement was 
founded in the St. Mary's in the present Florida. 
The Spaniard, Menendez, iii 1565 built another fort 
South of it, and by a wonderful overland march in a 
furious storm surprised it when half deserted and mas- 
sacred most of the inmates, hanging some on trees 
with the inscription, "I do this not as to French men but 
as to the Lutherans." He then enticed the shipwreeked 
remainder of the colony into his hands and butchered 
part of them, sending the rest home to the galleys. A 
Spanish fort was built in place of the French; a few- 
years later a Frenchman, Dominique de Gourgues, 
revenged the massacre by exterminating the Spanish 
settlement in turn, hanging some of the members with 
the inscription, "Not as to Spaniards, but as to traitors, 



34 

robbers, and murderers." Gourgues then returned home 

to curses from the Catholic leaders and coldness from 
the king, to have the Spanish minister demand hi^ 
head and be forced to hide for years, to five in debt 

and misery, and at last, after a few years of renewed 
favor, to die just as he had been given the command 
of the Portuguese licet to light against Philip II. 

Four years after Gourgues's expedition, came the 
massacre of St. Bartholomew, and it would seem that 
there should naturally have been a vast hegira of 
Protestants from France. There were such, though not 
quite so great as one would expect ; members lied to 
the English islands of and Guernsey, 

and to Great Britain, and to Holland, the latter receiv- 
ing a great immigration from the Walloon Country 
between Holland and France, (inhabited by a French- 
speaking people), now divided between France and 
Belgium. But the hopes of the Huguenots were not 
yet dead; they clung around the young Henry of Nav- 
arre and the great nobles headed by the Prince of 
Conde who adhered to their side; and four years after 
the massacre they demanded of Catherine of Medicis, 
the terms of the "Edict of January" (1562), giving 
them permission to hunt for the Reformed worship 
outside the walled towns, at which Catherine exclaimed 
in stupefied rage that they coifld not ask harder terms 
if Conde were in the midst of the kingdom with a great 
army. After many years of waiting these hopes were 
crowned with fruition. Henry nominally deserted them 
to gain the crown; but the edict of Nantes in 1598 
gave them nearly all that his adhesion could have done, 
while the latter would probably have ended in a bigoted 
Catholic king and no edict. Still they were very 
uneasy. The Catholics fought the carrying out of 
the edict ferociously, theParliament refused to register 
it till peremptorily ordered to do so by the king, the 
latter himself was jealous of the political powers of 
the Huguenots and especially of the strength they lent 



35 

to the great nobles who led them, and the Jesuits, 
though banished from the kingdom, were plainly re- 
gaining influence. Hence, when Henry set forth the 
long cherished plan of American colonization he had 

imbibed from his old teacher Coligny, with the special 
object of making France a great naval and commercial 
power, the Huguenots were eager to forward it, and 
the result was the eventual settlement, after repeated 
calamities and serious waste of lives and money, of 
Acadia and Canada. 

Again I must only sketch these Huguenot fiascos 
in outline, to clear the road for the real subject of this 
paper. The promising genesis of French Protestant 
colonies in the fur region, like the growth of Protestant- 
ism itself, were ruined by the murder of Henry LV in 
1610, and the renewed ascendency of the Catholics. 
These were resolved to have Canada a church colony; 
but it was sometime before they could turn the Hugue- 
nots out without at once annihilating it, for its entire 
life was in the trade with France, and that was carried 
on by the great merchants and companies of the Protest- 
ant seaboard provinces who alone possessed the capital 
and the ability to manage it. Conde was succeeded by 
the Catholic Due de Montmorency, who hated Hugue- 
nots; but that nobleman only transferred the manage- 
ment of the colonial trade to a company headed by a 
Huguenot merchant and navigator of Dieppe, Guillaume 
de Caen, already distinguished in the New Foundland 
fisheries, and who, aided by unstinted royal help (which 
however was given mainly because it was not needed ), 
and by vast privileges and monopolies in truly royal 
disregard of previous ones to other parties, made the 
company probably the richest and most prosperous of 
any that ever operated in the New World. 

In 1627, however, the final blow was struck. Mont- 
morency was succeeded in the vice-royalty by his nephew, 
the young Duke de Ventadour, a zealous devotee of the 
Jesuits; he sent over five more Jesuits, cancelled the 



patent of De Caen's Company, and formed a new one 
headed by Richelieu, Lit this very time besieging La 
Rochelle, whose fall a few months later broke forever 
the political power of the Huguenots. The- new com- 
pany bound itself to allow no emigrant to enter Canada 
unless he professed the Roman Catholic faith; Protest- 
antism could not be suppressed in France if its adherents 
could multiply and grow rich in the colonies, and monopo- 
lize the latter' s trade with the mouther country by their 
superior brains and thrift. 

For a moment the prey was snatched from the.Catho- 
lics by the war with England, which temporarily wrested 
Canada from France; but in 1632, the province was 
restored. De Caen's son, Emery, had been active 
and loyal in the war, and lost much; and was given a 
year's monopoly of the Canadian fur trade lo indemnify 
him, after which Cardinal Richelieu's new company 
took possession. Chaniplain being made governor of 
Quebec. The prohibitory policy was put in full force, 
but for a long time it was difficult to make it quite 
thorough in action. Protestants somehow got in in 
small numbers despite the rigid examination; sixteen 
were discovered (and "converted") in a regiment of 
regular troops sent over in 1665, and a number in a 
load of immigrants who landed at Quebec about the 
same time. Especially did settlers from La Rochelle 
give trouble, .till Bishop Laval, in loot, declared that lie 
wanted no more emigrants from that "hot-bed of heresy". 
But even the Jesuits dared not refuse to admit agents 
of mercantile companies from the Protestant provinces; 
even the work of Christ needed money to carry it on, 
and without the heretic traders it would have very 
little; however, the latter were closely watched and 
not permitted to exercise their religion in the colony, 
and the king was recpiested to forbid merchants to 
send over Protestant agents. Another serious trouble 
was that Protestants would nominally recant in Canada 
until they could escape to the English Colonies, form- 



37 

ing a nucleus of intrigue and possible revolution in 
Canada; and strict laws were passed against such 
removals, despite which, in 1683, the governer writes 
that there are over sixty of these "miserable French 
deserters" in Dutch towns under English control. 
They appear to have all got away or recanted, for in 
1686, shortly after the Revocation, the governer 
writes to the king that there is not a heretic in Canada. 
After this, also, the Huguenot traders were at last 
excluded. One of them was Gabriel Bernon, perhaps 
the ablest French merchant who ever came to this 
country; Denonville expresses some regret at ordering 
him to leave Quebec on the request of the bishop, as 
"he carries on a large business, and a great deal of money 
remains due to him here." There is no record that 
Bernon ever got any of this money. From this on, 
Canada was the darling and pride of the king and the 
Church, we have seen what they did with it and what 
they got out of it. 

The next refuge we have to deal with is the lir^t of 
our main subject -that along the Hudson. The charac- 
ter and impelling motives of the settlement of "New 
Amsterdam," and the sources of its permanent effect 
on the English New York, are not popularly under- 
stood; rather, no part of American history is so utterly 
misunderstood by or rather is such a mass of nonsense 
in the minds of the general public, owing mainly to 
one of the most delightful books in existence, Irving's 
"Knickerbocker." 1 know of no other instance where 
a book as purely a humorous invention as the travels 
of Lucian or Captain Munchausen has totally rooted 
out common sense and truth from the current ideas of 
an important historical subject; so thoroughly has this 
extravaganza penetrated the popular mind with a 
belief in its essential truthfulness to manners and 
national characters, even if not to incidents, that it is 
almost hopeless to attempt supplanting it with a true 
picture. Even if New Amsterdam had been purely 



38 

■ 

Dutch, nothing dould be much less like Irving's 'bul- 
bous-bottomed burghers," fat, logy, and stupid, desti- 
tute alike of quickness of mind and energy of body, of 
political sense and mechanical dexterity, with a society 
of bumpkins and blouzelindas, and an army of clod- 
hoppers, with ships that would not sail and guns that 
would not shoot,- nothing could be less like these 
dunderheaded beer casks than the fiery race who waged 
sixty years' war with the mighty power of Spain and 
came ou't of it far richer and greater than they went in, 
who bore for their religion every suffering and every 
outrage that even Spanish fiends could invent and carry 
out; who navigated their vessels to the unknown Malay 
Archipelago, swarming with terrors, real and fancied ; 
who traded with the potentates of the far east when 
no other merchants dared enter their clutches; who 
were the only nation on earth that ever solved the 
problem of building up a stable and prosperous colony 
on a foundation of native serfdom, and neither butchered, 
crowded out, made wild beasts of, nor gave unlit insti- 
tutions to the natives; who long defied the English 
navy, and, at the very time of the "Knickerbocker" 
narrative, burned the shipping in the Thames within 
sight of the Tower of London; who had fully determined 
rather than submit to the invaders to have their country 
in a body and found a New Holland in the Eastern 
Ocean; who with the noblest generosity have made 
their country for centuries an asylum for the perse- 
cuted of all nations and all creeds, even the Catholics, 
who so frightfully outraged them, and upheld the torch 
of liberty as a beacon to all mankind; whose farmers 
and gardeners have invented or developed nearly e very- 
conspicuous agricultural improvement since the Middle 
Ages, and to whose new processes and products England 
itself owes half its wealth and more than half its com- 
fort; whose jurists to this day are among the chief 
fountains of knowledge and thought concerning the 
mutual rights of nations and the principles of civilized 



39 

contention, and who developed from their own artistic 
genius one of the leading schools of art of all time; 
who have perhaps surpassed all others in combining 
typical idealism with rigid adherence to the hard gross 
ordinary conditions of nature. This the stolid, sleepy, 
dull-witted, nnwarlike, unintellectual, unartistic, greedy, 
pot-bellied race of Irving! 

No, New Amsterdam was not populated by beer- 
swilling boors and blowsy rustic damsels. But there 
is still another, misapprehension in the case -those who 
are proud of their descent from the "Knickerbocker' 
families do not realize how profoundly the Dutch 
blood (which did really have a heavy coarse and lout- 
ish element in it though one much exaggerated ) was 
modified by the French strain, which at the outset 
even surpassed it in volume. 

The foundation of New York was laid not by Dutch 
but by French colonists, though under Dutch authority; 
it is part of the history of the Huguenot immigration. 
The passengers on the "New Netherland" in 1023, who 
formed the first permanent settlement on Manhattan 
Island were Walloons (from vSotitheastern Belgium 
centering at Namurj, speaking both Dutch and French; 
and with some admixture of Dutch blood from inter- 
marriage, but practically French in blood and character. 
These Walloons had come to Holland mainly in two 
great waves; one in 1572, after St. Bartholomew, the 
other in 157°, after the breaking away of the Southern 
Netherlands from the league with Holland and Zealand 
against Spain, and then falling back into the clutches 
of the latter and the Inquisition. One oi their chief 
seats in Holland was Leyden, the refuge of John Robin- 
son and the English "Brownists;" and the various 
attempts of the latter, succeeding in 1620, to emigrate 
to the New World, stirred up the Leyden Walloons to 
a similar effort exile for exile, they might as well seek 
fortunes in America. Several of them went with the 
English on the "Speedwell" and " Mayflower "-^-ambng 



40 

them William Molines, father of the Priscilla who 
married John Alden; and later, a company of them 
headed by Isaae I )e Forest (the ancestor of the I >e 

Forest family here), petitioned Sir Dudley Carlton, 
English Minister at the Hague, for privileges of set- 
tlement in "Virginia." Carlton thought their demands 
"extravagant," but referred them to the Virginia 
Company which refused to give them any assistance in 
going, or allow them to settle in compact bodies as 
they wished. But they had ahead)' sighted better 
game. The Dutch government knew of their petition, 
and was anxious to turn the intending migration to it ^ 
own profit, and the long-mooted "Dutch West India 
Company" having at last been formed, a ship-load was 
sent over in 1623 as I have noted. 

An advance guard had been on the ground for ten 
years, Adrian Block, and several others having dwelt 
on Manhattan Island since 1613; the first European 
child born there, Jean Vigne, was born in 1614, of 
Huguenot parents. Eight families remained on the 
island; four couples who had been married at sea were 
sent "to grow up with the country" on the lower Dela- 
ware, near the site of Philadelphia; two families settled 
on the Connecticut; and eighteen families passed on 
up the Hudson and built Fort Orange, now Albany. 

From this on for many years, men of all countries 
were drawn to New Amsterdam, which as early as 
1643 had representatives from eighteen different nation 
alities, and had acquired in a measure the polyglot 
character which New York has never lost; but the Dutch 
and French each outnumbered all others, and in both 
city and the new settlements which rapidly budded 
out around it, the French element was of capital im- 
portance. As late as 1661, nearly half the inhabitants 
of New Harlem were French. 

The long list of palpably French names I could cite 
from early tax lists, military and quartering lists, deeds, 
marriage registers, cemeteries, those wdio swore alle- 



4' 

giance to the English at the surrender, etc., would 
be tedious and needless to give in lull. But I must 
mention that Peter Minuits, the second director 
general, was himself a Walloon; that Peter Stuyvesant, 
the last governor, was doubly allied to the French, 
having married Judith Bayard, daughter of the Hugue- 
not who was the ancestor of that distinguished family 
here, while his sister married Samuel, the brother of 
Judith; that the first Christian daughter born here 
was of the Huguenot Rapelye, who was ancestor of a 
well-known citizen of Hartford; and that among the 
others we find the ancestral names of the illustrious 
John Jay, of the late Christopher R. Robert of New 
York, founder of Robert College, at Constantinople, 
of the Dupont powder-making family and of the admiral; 
of the present mayor of Chicago (Cregier), of the De- 
laneys and Demorests, and Deforests,. 1 )evoe, Depew, 
De Kay, Delaplaine, DePeyster, and Delanoy; of 
Dupuy, and Durie; Dubois, and Dufour, Bethlo who 
gave his name to the now famous Bedloe's Island; of 
Anthony and Benton, Brock and Hasbrouck, some of 
the Burkes, Boons, and Bennetts, Carpenters, Lamberts, 
and Wards, Fontaine, Montaine, and Romeyn, Brull, 
Fell, Gill, Gillis, and Sill, Camp, Gray, and Culver; 
Damon, (jay and Grand, Ives, Lafarge, Lagrange, and 
Leroy; Martin, Major, and Molt, Parmenter, Perrin, 
and Provost, Reno and Richard, Salter, and Vincent. 
And this is not all: Dutch names did not always imply 
Dutch blood. Not only were there often French 
mothers, but Walloons frequently gave Dutch forms 
to their names for social or political reasons. For 
example, the first pastor of the French Church in 
Boston, whose name was Laurent du Bois, called him- 
self Laurentius den Bosch, and it is no rare thing to 
find Dutch spelling of French names, as Du Rij for 
Durie, and others. The importance of the French 
element even when the percentage of French names on 
the roll is not large, is proved by the fact that all 



42 

official documents, even after the capture of the city 
by the English, were published in both Dutch and 
French; and for my present purpose, that of showing 
the French factor in the blood of the aristocratic 
"Knickerbocker" families, there is a still more important 
fact, that the French families were largely among the 
aristocracy of the place, and intermarried with the 
leading Dutch families. I have spoken of one French 
governor and the French alliances of another; and the 
secretary «of the third Kieft, was De La Montaguie, a 
Frenchman. In a short list, dated 1653, of the 
chief citizens of New Amsterdam, 1 find the names of 
De Peyster, De Forest, Joris, Vigne, Kregier, Antony, 
and De la Noy, and in a list in 1074 of those whose 
property exceeded 300 guilders, out of nineteen French 
names only four fall below 1,000, while Du Puy and 
Pombou rise to 5,000. Gabriel Minville, (a leading 
merchant, afterwards mayor of the city under the 
English rule) to 10,000, and Johannes De Peyster to 
15,000. It may help to explain why the old New York 
families of "Dutch" descent should to the present day 
have retained the social supremacy there, and kept 
socially above the mass of later accessions as easily as 
oil above water, despite an ancestry which with all 
its remarkable qualities was conspicuously not remarka- 
ble for exactly those qualities, and that the effects of 
the French blood in the Knickerbocker veins are not 
obliterated by any amount of "Vans" in the family 
names. 

It is not perhaps drawing a forced inference to sus- 
pect that the easy submission of New Amsterdam to 
the English even though its forces were small and the 
(fleet had blockaded it) was connected with the fact that 
half its inhabitants had no burning national feeling, 
and probably did not think the question of govern- 
ment worth shedding their blood over. A purely 
Dutch city would probably at least have fought a 
little first. 



43 

Still another settlement was made later on from a 
different source, the Lower Palatinate on the Rhine, 
one of the leading Protestant German States, promi 
nent in the Thirty Years' War; mostly from the Capital 
Mannheim and from Frankenthal close by. This State 
had been a kindly refuge for the Walloons from butchery 
by Alva's soldiers, and for the Vaudois from massacre 
by the Savoyard troops; but it was too small to be 
secure from being overrun by the French, and in 1660 
a number of families came to New Amsterdam. The 
Village of Wiltwyck, where Kingston now stands, had 
begun to hope for the future after imminent danger 
from the Esopus Indians, and the lands along the 
Esopus, the Rondout, and the Wallkill were open for 
settlement; the new refugees first joined the Wiltwyck 
colony, and later some of them began another called 
the "New Village," a mile west, on land claimed by 
the Indians. They acted with insane folly, selling the 
Indians all the rum they wished and building no forti- 
fications. The result was a combined attack on both 
settlements while the men were in the fields. The 
"New Village" was destroyed, three men killed, and 
eight women with twenty-six children were taken 
prisoners; the success was less complete in the other, 
but far Worse in volume, twenty-four men being killed 
and mutilated, and forty-live women and children 
captured, while twelve houses were burned. Two 
expeditions a month apart were undertaken to rescue 
the captives; in the second, twenty-three of them [pre- 
sumably all that were alive) were rescued, and as the 
Indians had been virtually exterminated, the Ksopus 
district had no further trouble with them. A few 
years later some of the Vaudois exiles formed a new 
settlement in the Wallkill Valley, which they called 
"New Paltz", or the New Palatinate. The capture 
of New Amsterdam by the English in 1664 ended this 
chapter of Huguenot history as a special episode, 
though not their emigration to the city or state, or 



4-1 

much very interesting internal history. But the Latter 

-including the long and furious internecine light in 
the French Church, where one party refused to recog- 
nize the consistory or the treasurer as legal or to accept 
the minister, and finally nailed up the church against 
the majority, but were at length beaten in the courts 
belongs to local New York antiquities. I should, 
however, add that a distinctly Huguenot offshoot 
was established in 1677, at Haekensaek, on Lands 
bought from the Tappan Indians, by David des Mare^t 
and others; but before many years it was swamped by 
the advancing tide of Dutch settlement (that race having 
in full, measure the Teutonic breeding instinct, and the 
Huguenots apparently sharing the French caution), 
the daughters married Dutch youths, and the remnant 
joined the Dutch Church and were lost to view. Small 
groups also settled in New Jersey, a considerable number 
in a bunch near Princeton; but there were no specially 
French towns there. 

I have spoken of these settlements as "of choice." 
Of course, in one sense the)' were forced, but they were 
mainly of people who could more or less take- their 
time; who were at least temporarily in a place of safety 
with reasonable means of livelihood, and not com- 
pelled to fly in headlong haste to save life or liberty, 
to save their wives from the dragoons or the convents, 
or their children from being kidnapped by the priests, 
or else be forced to deny their faith. But those to 
come are mostly of the latter sort; or if safe for the time 
as those who came from England, yet they were fresh 
from the horrors of the dragonnades or the Revocation, 
and only halting till they could find a further resting- 
place. It is not, of course, meant that these families 
always (though in vast numbers, of course, it was so) 
got blindly aboard the first ship they could scramble 
into; they often gained time by a prudent recantation 
for a careful plan, based on information from the 
traders who knew the places in the New World. But it 



45 

was not generally practicable to do much else than 
aceept such offers as shipmasters or emigration companies 
made them; the former, of course, only took small 
numbers at a time, and the latter were decidedly averse 
to their settling in isolated blocks, preferring to open 
up as much territory as possible. Hence, tin- meager- 
ness of the story there is to tell about these later immi- 
grations, pitifully scant in proportion to its real import- 
ance, and out of all perspective with what has gone 
before. The French contingent was very important 
and valuable, but it was scattered and the reverse of 
repellent to other elements; hence, it rapidly blended 
with the English, lost its speech and its identity, 
founded few or no predominantly French towns, and 
after marvelously few years was recognizable only by 
family names and traditions and traits of soeial eharae- 
ter. A minute history would consist either of genea- 
logical tables or records of old deeds, such as go to make 
up most of local antiquities; and short of this, it is 
difficult to put anything into an outline beyond the 
statement that "large numbers" (or small numbers) 
"of Huguenots settled in different parts of the State 

of — in the years - ." 

Beginning at the north, the first place on our list 
of asylums for the exiles is Boston. A few French 
families had come over straggling from 1660 on, princi- 
pally from the Channel Islands, but a few from Rochelle 
and other places; the Beadles, the Cabots, and the 
Englishes, notably of the former. Philip English, of 
vSalem, the great merchant who with his wife came near 
execution in the Salem witchcraft craze — the latter in 
fact dying from the treatment she then received -was 
one of these. But the dragonnades and the Revocation 
brought a very considerable number to Massachusetts 
(not all of whom, of course, remained in Boston); 
Palfery says a hundred and fifty families, and Baird 
thinks the estimate too low. Among these were some 
of the highest interest to us. EUe Neau, the companion 



4 6 

of John Eliot, whose spirit he imbibed, and who after- 
wards devoted his life to teaching negro slaves in New 
York, came thither from the West Indies. Pierre 
Baudouin was the ancestor of Governor James Bowdoin, 
abundantly commemorated with his son in Bowdoin 
College and Bowdion Square and Street and Mount 
Bowdoin in Boston; Benjamin Faneuil was the father 
of Peter Faneuil, who gave to Boston the "Cradle of 
Liberty, " oddly known to old Bostonians as "Funnel 
Hall;" and Andre Sigonrney was tin: ancestor of Charles 
Sigourney, first of Boston, and then of Hartford, who 
married, Lydia Huntly. There came also Gabriel 
Bernon, the great Canadian merchant, whom we have 
already seen expelled from Quebec as a heretic; he 
returned to France in 1685, just in lime to get into 
prison, but finally escaped to Holland and came thence 
to Boston. 

The ancestors of the Bassets, the Chardouns, the 
Olivers, of whom the late Henry K. of Salem was ino^t 
famous, and the Tourtellottes, also came over at this 
time. The Huguenots were well received and well 
treated in Boston, fairly helped till they could get on 
their feet, and a large proportion rose to a considerable 
social and business position as evidenced not only by 
the records, but by the prominent streets named after 
them — Chardon vStreet, Oliver Street, Cabot Street, 
Bowdoin Street, etc. Their church flourished well for 
a generation; but Boston was not a very congenial 
home for them they could hardly have liked its 
social or religions tone or sympathized with its ideals - 
and many of them soon drifted off elsewhere. Especially 
several of them, including the energetic and versatile 
Bernon; moved to Narragansett Bay, the chief seat of 
the West India trade, which they liked and understood 
best. The infusion of French blood was so valuable 
to a New England community that it seems a pity- 
there was not more of it. 

The settlement ten miles from our own Woodstock 



47 

— at Oxford, Mass. was a rosy dream ending in a 
terrible nightmare. Daniel Bondet, a Huguenot minis- 
ter, came from London to Boston in 168'6 under contract 
to convert the small remnant of the Nipmuck Indians 
which he never did. The next year, with ten of the 
fifteen families who came with him, he set out to locate 
near the wigwams of the tribe, and settled in the lovely 
meadows of the Maanexit or French River. Very soon 
they were joined,)))' Isaae de Tuffeau, Gabriel Bernou's 
partner, with several companions, he having patented 
750 acres there; and the lirst year passed so prosper- 
ously that Bernon bought 2,500 acres and came there 
himself with several more families. For a few years 
all went well; the place increased to nearly a hundred 
families, and the Indians seemed (as they were; a 
lazy gang of spiritless cowardly tramps, and inspired 
no dread. But the Indian trader was there with his 
rum; and worse yet the agents of the Jesuits from Canada 
were there eliciting the Indians to destroy the white 
settlements, and especially this one of French renegades. 
The party that perpetrated the massaere at Oyster 
River had first planned to strike the settlements west 
of Boston; and in the summer of 1694, a band of Canada 
Indians murdered the daughter of one of the Oxford 
settlers and carried two smaller children off to Quebec. 
The Nipmueks at once took the war path and kept 
the Oxford people shut up in their fort all summer, 
the crops going to ruin. 

In their fright the French lost all heart; and each 
one thinking the settlement doomed, all bonds of com- 
radeship or loyalty seem to have given way. Du 
Tuffeau, Bernon's agent and the village magistrate, 
being called to account for malfeasance, sold the stock 
and furniture off the plantation and absconded in 1696; 
Pastor Bondet left also, taking all the town papers 
and books with him; and several others went about 
the same time. But the rest held on till the next 
year, when a Nipmuck, who had fought with King. Philip 



4« 

in 1675, whose clan had been terribly punished by the 
English for their part in it, and who was besides an 

agent of the Jesuits, took along a band to the Oxford 
village, murdered the three children of one of the 
settlers (the wife escaping), and lying in wait for the 
husband, murdered him as he entered the house. 
vSoldiers from Worcester prevented further trouble, 
but the settlement at once broke up and dispersed, 
against the protests of Bernon most of them going to 
Boston, one to Milford, Conn., two to New York, and 
one to New Rochelle, where two others, including Du 
Tuffeau, had preceded him. Bernon, however, now 
in Newport, was not willing to give up the settlement, 
especially, as the land reverted to the old proprietors 
in such case. He finally induced those who had gone 
to Boston to return three years later, while he laid 
out a good deal of money for their benefit, and estab- 
lished a wash-leather factory on the creek, the product 
being carted to Providence for him to send to Boston 
and Newport hatters and glovers. 'This went on till 
early in 1704, though the Indians were threatening and 
still got all the rum they wanted. The Nipmuck 
murderer of Johnson and his children was still around, 
and the Jesuits were more active than ever. At last 
came the series of Indian massacres closing with the 
horrible tragedy of Decrfield, in February, 1704; that 
town was but forty five miles oil, and the danger to 
the little village of hated heretics" was too great. 
They abandoned it definitely, all but Bernon, who kept 
a tenant there to maintain his title; and nine years 
later thirty English families settled there and remained. 
'J4ie settlement in Rhode Island, 1686-91, is a most 
disagreeable story, and yet it promised more hopefully 
at the outset than any other Huguenot establishment, 
in plain English, they were swindled by a New England 
company, which seems to have been organized for the 
express purpose of selling innocent foreigners lands to 
which it had no title, though it doubtless hoped to get 



49 

one by hook and crook and prevent ejectment of the 
buyers. The country of the Narragansetts on the 
west side of the bay was in dispute between Rhode 
Island and Connecticut, and the Indians claimed that 
neither of them had any right to it, as the king only 
could dispose of it. At this juncture an association of 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut men, 
calling itself the Atherton Company, got a semi-fraudu- 
lent concession! of this territory from the Narragansetts, 
and started an emigration bureau in London to sell 
the land to intending colonists. 

The Crown first decided for Rhode Island as against 
Connecticut, and then declared the Atherton Company's 
claims to be altogether void; but the latter kept on 
offering the lands for sale, and in 1680 unloaded some 
forty of fifty families of French refugees upon a tract 
still known as French-town, in what is now Hast Green- 
wich. These soon had one of the most nourishing 
settlements in New England: orchards and vineyards 
were planted, and there seemed every prospect of a 
rich community. But the planters of Kingstown and 
Hast Greenwich were justly outraged by this settle- 
ment, innocent as the French were; for as long before 
as 1677 this very tract had been parcelled out among 
some -of them by Rhode Island. They took the charac- 
teristic Rhode Island way of not resorting to law, but 
acting as their own court and jury; and when the grass 
on the tract was lit to cut, proceeded to mow the fields 
and carry oil the hay. Both parties appealed to Gover- 
nor Andros, who compromised the immediate question 
by dividing the hay between the French, as "'lately 
settled and destitute," and the poorest of the English, 
and seems to have acted with much tact to heal the 
breach. For a while there was no further disturbance; 
the Atherton Company got some further grants, in 
one of which this land was included, thus strengthening 
their title; the French physicians became indispensable 
to the English in the vicinity, and the minister, Carre, 



50 

was much esteemed. But a new cause of friction arose, 
the last that one would suspect even of human stupidity 
and eraven-heartedness. If there was one tiling on 
earth the Huguenots could not be suspected of, it wu^ 
being in league with the Jesuits; and yet in 1689, in 
fear of a French war and of the French and Indian 
ravages which had just begun, the General Court of 
Massachusetts suggested in a resolution to the Governor 
and Council that all the French residents be not only 
forced to take an oath of allegiance, but have their 
plantations searched for arms and ammunition by "a 
prudent man with a sufficient guard/' and any suspi- 
cious characters be seized and brought to Boston. 
The Rhode Islanders acted promptly on this suggestion, 
after their manner; that is to say, a band of worthless 
scallawags searched all the French houses without 
legal authority whatever, and not improbably carried 
off some of the portable property lying handy. Both 
the French and the decent English remonstrated against 
this, and the provisional government of Massachusetts 
issued a manifesto reprobating it. The next year the 
Rhode Island government ordered the French settlers 
to come to Warwick and take the oath of allegiance to 
the British Crown; which they did, but justly much 
hurt at this silly suspicion. They were promised 
undisturbed possession after this. But the rabble of 
the neighboring towns had come to understand that the 
planters silently sympathized with the harassing oi 
the French, even when they did not care personally to 
engage in it, and would not lift a linger to punish it; 
and in the summer of 1691, started on a course of 
systematic and cowardly persecution which speedily 
broke up the settlement -tearing down the fences as fast 
as they were put up, and thus letting the cattle in to 
destroy the crops, being the chief method. The colony 
dispersed, the greatest number going to New York, 
but some to almost every Huguenot settlement on the 
continent. Two of them, however, remained oil their 



5i 

farms and pluckily fought it out; one of them, I,e Moine, 
retaining the entire site of the French Village, which 
remains in his family to this day. 

Other Huguenots settled in various parts of Rhode 
Island -North Kingstown, Bristol, etc. some having 
illustrious names. One who came to Providence, in 
1639, was Maturin Ballon, ancestor of Hosea Ballon, 
the famous preacher, whose daughter Eliza was tin- 
mother of President Barfield, and whose son, Maturin 
M., is of considerable note as a clever journalist and 
editor. In 1638, the ancestor of the well-remembered 
Grinnell family of New York, of whom one is of note in 
the annals of Polar explorations, came to Portsmouth. 
The great merchant Gabriel Bernon has been plenti- 
fully mentioned; but it may be added to the list of his 
activities that he helped found the first three Episcopal 
churches in Rhode Island, and that a petition headed 
by him and Pierre Ayrauet to Lord Bellomont, asking 
the Board of Trade to furnish them a minister in con- 
sideration of their building a church, led to the founda- 
tion in 1701 of the vSociety for the Propagation of the 
Gospel in Foreign Parts. This noble type of the 
Huguenots at their best lived to be 91. 

Connecticut can hardly be said to have had a "French 
settlement" proper, but Milford and Hartford were 
the homes of several whose names are still reputed. 
The former has already been mentioned as the refuge 
of one or two after the break-up oi the Oxford and Nar- 
ragansett settlements. The Gitlett and Durand fami- 
lies spring from Milford settlers who came here, the 
former, in 1703, the latter perhaps a little later, having 
come first to the southern colonies in 1702. Peiret, 
Collin, Liron, and Depont are other names of this 
place. The Resseguies of Norwalk and others are 
of Huguenot stock. Hartford, besides the less known 
names of Chevenard, Duplessus, and Beauchamp, 
has the well very known ones of Laurens and vSigourney. 

With the New York settlement I have already dealt; 



its further Huguenot accessions belong mainly to local 
history, and the one item still to mention is part of 
the final section of this paper. Of the settlers in Penn- 
sylvania and Maryland, I can literally say nothing 
except the blank form indicated above. Penn and 
Calvert were fully alive to the value of these high- 
minded refugees as colonizing timber, and sought 
them and got them in considerable numbers from the 
crowds Hocking to England after the Revocation (the 
chief Maryland settlement being about 1690 ) and others 
settled in these colonies for a finality after coming lir^t 
to others. We know that there were many hundreds 
in each; but their exact distribution, the leading fami- 
lies derived from them, or the industries developed by 
them, I can find no present means of determining. 

The important Virginian settlement claims our atten- 
tion next. There had been scattering Huguenot emi- 
gration to the Southern colonies since early in the 
Seventeenth Century; but in 1690, William III sent 
to Virginia some three hundred French refugees who 
had followed him from Holland to England, settling 
them on lands formerly occupied by the extinct Monacan 
tribe (on the James about 20 miles above Richmond) 
and the settlement was known as Monacan- (or Mana- 
kin- )tovvn. In 1698 a number of French and Vaudois 
refugees in England opened negotiations with the 
proprietary oi ''Carolina ami Florida," to buy half a 
million acres o( land on Appalachee Hay, with the 
privilege of buying as much more, the rent being "'a 
ripe ear of corn" for the first seven years - that is, 
nothing. These negotiations proving fruitless, they 
asked the Lords of Trade for assistance in colonizing 
around the Dismal Swamp, disputed between Vir- 
ginia and Carolina. This coming to the ears of the 
very able Receiver-General of Virginia, William Byrd, 
who held large grants of land he was anxious to improve 
(including the site of Richmond, afterwards founded 



53 

by his son, the more famous Col. Win. Byrd) lit: wrote 
an elaborate and amusing letter to the Lords, giving no 
less than six convincing reasons why the Huguenots 
should on no consideration be sent to Carolina, but 

should be settled on his lands on the upper James, 
near Monaeantown. These were, succinctly 1. That 
the Carolina land was both barren and malarious, and 
the French would all die there, whereas his own was 
fertile and healthy. 2. That it would be much 
cheaper, because the Governor of Virginia will help 
them all he can and induce other wealthy people to 
do so; and . that provisions are cheaper and assistance 
in need close at hand than "in that dismal part of Caro- 
lina." 3. That the harassments of the disputed title 
would force the settlers eventually to make choice 
between the two colonies, and it will save much incon- 
venience to send them to Virginia in the fust place. 
4. That it was Mis Majesty's evident interest to send 
them to that colony where they would soonest be able 
to shift for themselves and be a souree of strength to 
England. 5. That as between a Crown and a pro- 
prietary colony, the first ought, of course, to be pre- 
ferred. And b. That a colony in "that fag end of 
North Carolina" would be an intolerable nuisance to 
Virginia as a harborage for all its criminals and run- 
away servants; and that if the King only knew how the 
proprietary governments harbored pirates, smugglers. 
etc., he would break up all the existing colonies of the 
kind instead of starting any new ones. 

This exhaustive dpcumnet had in part the desired 
effect; in 1700 four shiploads of Huguenots, numbering 
over 500, under the lead of the Marquis de la Muce, 
came to Virginia, and though about half of them settled 
at Jamestown, and in vSurrey and Norfolk counties, the 
rest were established at "Monacantown." They dis- 
covered coal there, and manufactured a fair claret out 



54 

of wild grapes; but one lias a certain malicious pleasure 
in finding that with all their heroism they were 

"Creatures not too bright or good 
For human nature's daily food." 

Byrd reports the next year that they had some garden 
trade and had planted corn, but few of them had 
broken up any ground or "wed" it, that they had let 
weeds and cattle destroy their corn patches, and that 
he had told them they could not keep the land unless 
they would improve it, and that unless they raised 
corn enough to live on the next year they would get 
no further help. He says he has already bought up 
all the corn in two counties to feed them, and can get 
no more. These troubles, however, were temporary. 
Two hundred more settlers came the next year, and 
not long after, another hundred; and the settlement 
seemed destined to a very considerable future. Hut 
religious dissensions, which were as rife and as furious 
among the Huguenots as the Puritans, split the society 
in two and the pastor led a part of them to the banks 
of the Trent, in North Carolina; clearing sonic lands 
here they were frightened away by an Indian massacre 
near by, and finally obtained a permanent home in 
South Carolina, joining the settlement on the Santee 
called Jamestown. 

flu' South Carolina colonization was naturally the 
most vigorous and permanent of all; parallels of lati- 
tude have always been a determining influence in 
emigration— partly from their implying like agricul- 
ture, but often from real fondness even for a harsh 
climate if wonted to it. With the French, however, 
it was southern warmth and possible vineyards which 
won them. The movement thither began late; a few 
English and French settlers came over in 1670, and 
the city of Charleston was not founded till 1680, largely 
under French auspices. The same year there came 



55 

ninety or so Huguenots sent by Charles II to engage 
in the production of wine, oil and silk. But it was not 
till after the Revocation that the great tide began to 
How in. By 1687 there were four French settlements 
in this region — Jamestown, on the Santee, the "(Mange 
Quarter," on the Cooper; at St. John's, Berkeley; and 
at Charleston. In 1 732, a hand of 360 Swiss Protest- 
ants, mainly French, settled Purysburgh, on the Savan- 
nah; and in 1764, the last French colony was formed - 
New Bordeau in Abbeville County. In the intervals 
there was a 'steady stream, very large for many years 
after 1685. 

The effect of this great influx of fiery blood and quick 
sensibilities stands out in every chapter of American 
history since. Some of its inheritors are on our fore- 
most roll of fame. To give the entire list even of the 
important families which bear and honor the names of 
French ancestors would be out of the question here; 
it would be tedious from its very magnitude, and most 
of it would have little meaning to a Northern audience. 
But some of the names belong to the world, and are 
known to all persons of decent education; and many 
others deserve mention. Francis Marion, the "Swamp 
Fox" of the Revolution, an unequalled partisan, a 
generous, loyal, and high-minded gentleman, is known 
even to schoolboys. Scarcely below him in note, and 
not below him in merit, are a perfect host from the 
might)' family of linger, which lias furnished a swarm of 
soldiers and statesmen in every generation for a cen- 
tury and a half, and from the Revolution to the Civil 
War has stood in the forefront of battle. Beside these 
naturally stands the name of Henry baurens, a presi- 
dent of the Continental Congress, and a negotiator of 
American Independence. The Revolution brings up 
memories of such partisans as the I lorry s, Postells 
and others. Another name of the foremost rank, 
eminent alike in science and warfare, is that of Lieu- 
tenant Matthew Maury. In public life, all eonver- 



5<> 

sant with our history respect the names of John Gail- 
lard, Hugh vS. Legare, and Joel R. Poinsett. Of a full 
hundred of other notable names, those derived from 
the stocks of Porcher, Girard, Janvier, Chastaignier, 
Mazicq, Buretel, Mause (vulgarized into Moses) 
Vignaud, Prioleau, Meniin, Cailleboeuf, Michaud, l>e- 
laplaine, Royer, Carton, Pasquereau, Bacot, Le Bas, 
Le Grand, Le Moine, Le Sueur, La Motte, Ravenel, 
Gignilliat, Bourdieu, Dutartre, Trouillard, Picard, Dugue, 
and Ainiaii, must stand as a small selection, perhaps 
not more representative than other lists I could make, 
to illustrate the varied excellences of this racial sap. 
And it must he remembered that by far the greater 
part of it esixts disguised under English nanus, in 
families with whom the French have intermarried. 

It is pitiful to have to record that after these families 
had exiled themselves in poverty and faced horrible 
deaths to enjoy their religion, persecutions in South 
Carolina forced them to close their churches. The 
authorities intended to establish the Church of Eng- 
land as the state church, and did so; laws were passed 
from time to time, which in 1692 had gone so far as to 
make marriages invalid under the French Church 
service, and the children, of course, illegitimate. . An 
appeal to the Lords Proprietors in that year restored 
the rights of the Huguenots, though even. then it was 
not till 1696 that the Legislature complied with their 
orders; but in 170-1 it was enacted that conformity to 
the Church of England should be a necessary quali- 
fication for members of the Legislature, and in 1706, 
all but members of that Church were disfranchised. 
The Proprietors and Queen Anne condemned this, 
but did nothing to rectify it; and the Huguenots, 
offered the bribe of government support of churches and 
ministers, and the privilege of having the liturgy trans- 
lated into French, and reasoning that after all it was 
a Protestant service, yielded— as Englishmen or Scotch- 
men certainly would not have done. This pliancy of 



57 

temper makes many things in their history intelligible. 

If this seems ungracious to people who bore so much 
and so heroically, and to whom we owe so much of 
splendid service and inspiring example, it can only he- 
said that the strength and the weakness of a character 
go together. Mobility means readiness to disarm as 
well as to arm, to blend as well as to bristle; without 
South Carolina's emotional softness we should not 
have had her emotional fire, which again and again has 
made her the leader of the South. 

The last region that demands attention is the West 
Indies, especially as a half-way house to the English 
colonies. By the circumstance of their original settle- 
ment these belong entirely to the former group, of 
voluntary colonization; but their later history and the 
flight from there ib so intimately a part of the Revo- 
cation, that I have reserved them for the finale. The 
islands of St. Christopher, Guadeloupe, and Marti- 
nique, with some smaller ones, were colonized by a 
trading company under Richelieu's patronage from 
1626 on; the company was required to instruct the 
inhabitants in the- Roman Catholic religion, but no 
religions test was imposed on its own members or any 
restriction on its choice of colonists till 1 638, when 
its new charter bound it to take over none but good 
Catholics; but the requirement was a dead letter; 
without Protestants there was no trade. The public 
exercise of the Reformed religion was forbidden, but 
the governors connived at the freest of private meetings; 
one of them was a Protestant himself, another .was 
charged with appointing a Huguenot to the most 
important offices; the Huguenots had several churches, 
were plentifully supplied with clergy by the Walloon 
Synod of Holland, and not only in wealth and influence, 
but even in numbers, outstripped the Catholics. As 
the Revocation approached, various penal laws were 
passed forbidding the exercise of the religion, or even 
conversation upon it, prohibiting Protestants from 



5« 

selling their property within the islands, etc., but they 
amounted to nothing, though some annoyances and 
petty outrages were inflicted on the Protestants under 
them. But the Revocation changed everything. 

The first result as regards the islands was the use 
of them as penal settlements for the Huguenots, many 
hundreds being sent over to intimidate the rest into 
recantation. Every sort of moral and physical terror 
was employed to heighten the dread of this punishment, 
which Was regarded as worse than death or the galleys, 
and in some respects was so. Husbands and wives, 
parents and children, were carefully and thoroughly 
separated, driven through the streets in chain gangs, 
or tied on carts, and so brutally used that many died 
on the way, or in the jail where they waited for the 
ships; the horrors of their condition in another conti- 
nent, separated by half the world from all they knew, 
and slaves to masters who would beat them like cat- 
tle, were carefully set before them, and their keepers 
sometimes added that the men would be hanged and 
the women given to the savages. The horrors of this 
prospect made most of them recant before- the ships 
sailed; but unless it was souk- little time before, they 
were shipped all the same. ( )n the voyage, the treat- 
ment was so shocking Wd on the worst food in the 
scantiest portions; confined in hutches where they 
could neither sit or lie, loathsome of air and swarming 
with vermin, beaten, kicked, and drenched with sea 
water that a quarter oi them died. The hardships 
of their condition had in some cases been scarcely 
exaggerated; the worst state of negroes in the cane 
fields was not more intolerable than theirs, and one 
master boasted that he had killed three hundred of 
these serfs with his own hand. But he was probably a 
liar as well as a brute; and the majority of the exiles 
were humanely treated, their masters being often 
Protestants who considered them as martyrs to be 
honored. Their first thought was naturally of escape, 
and they were very successful in finding the means of 



59 

so doing. Meanwhile the governor general had been or- 
dered to take strict measures for extirpating heresy in 
the islands, and to threaten the Protestants with im- 
prisonment or the dragonnade if they did not recant. 
The effect was a rapid flight of the Protestants, and a 
secret contract was made with some shipmasters to 
carry away all the Huguenot families. The governor- 
general, getting word of this, called the chief men 
together and warned them to desist, or he would enforce 
the King's orcjers in full severity. This highly judicious 
threat produced so general a stampede, assisted by the 
Catholics themselves, that the islands in a few months 
were half depopulated and their trade nearly ruined. 
Then the King began to come to his senses, and ordered 
the heretics to be gently treated and merely required 
to attend religious instruction, and the poll-tax to be 
remitted for a year on new converts; this checked the 
flight and brought a few back, but most of them re- 
mained in the English colonies or Bermuda. Several 
score at least of the refugees came to New York, includ- 
ing the ancestor of John Pintard, the founder of the 
New York Historical Society; a number of them 
founded the town of New Roclielle, sixteen miles from 
New York; and Boston received IJlie Neau, before 
mentioned. The southern colonies seem to have re- 
ceived a large quota. This emigration had an important 
effect on our trade with the West Indies; the Huguenot 
merchants, having intimate knowledge of these and 
their people, and ties of blood and friendship, naturally 
took the lead in this trade, and were in the habit of 
sending their sons to round out their business educa- 
tion by a sojourn there. 

Baird sets the "dead-line" about the middle of the 
Eighteenth Century; beyond that time, he says, few 
existed and still fewer kept their language. It was best 
that it should be so; the French or any other element 
in the composition of the "American" blood or society 
could not do its work by remaining in isolation, and to 
do so was peculiarly alien to the French character. 



Go 



As a class, they perished soon, and utterly; nor have 
they left any distinctive stain]) on our legislation or 
political structure, nor is there any institution or even 
industry that can be said to owe its origin directly to 
them. Nevertheless, it is not too much to say that 
much in our institutions and our industries, our social 
and our political life, would probably be different but 
for what they brought and what they were, the knowl 
edge they gave us and the disposition they helped to 
mold. They brought many trade secrets, much indus- 
trial experience, much business knowledge and capacity. 
What was far more important, their unflagging zeal 
for popular education in the widest sense, vastly broader- 
and more disinterested than the theologically based 
educational fervor of the Puritans, was no mean factor 
in creating the intense American instinct* which makes 
such education a part of our national creed. They 
lightened the heavy English blood by an invaluable 
component, added grace to an ungraceful stock, artis- 
tic feeling to an unartistic one, and in general, sensi- 
tiveness to a rather coarse and immobile one, delicacy 
to a gross one, social readiness to a loutish one; and in 
short, may justly claim some of the credit for the 
undoubted superiority which "the American" in some 
respects possesses over the solid stock from whence 
in the main he sprung. 

The following old portraits have been photographed 
for Mr Henry R. 1) wight, who has consented to the 
making of copies by Mr. Clarke for sale to any of the 
descendants of the originals who may care to have 
them 

James L,e Serrurier and wife. 

Isaac Mazyck and wife. 

Rene I y ouis Ravenel and wife. 

Catherine L,e Noble. 

Stephen Mazyck and wife. 

At W. D. Clarke, 301 King Street 

Charleston, S. C. 



LIST OF MEMBERS 



APRIL. 1 912. 



r .. 1 1 . l. . 



ERRATA 



Oct. 30, 1885.. Law ton, Mrs. W. Wallace, Charleston, S. C 

Robert, Broye, leGrand, deMan- 
gueville, Jaudon. 

April 11, lS98..Lawt.m, St. John Alison, Charleston, S. C 

Robert, Broye, leGrand, deMan- 
gueville, Jaudon. 

Feb. 21, 1900.. Lewis, Mrs. Rosa Lawton Douglas (Mrs. James 

Hamilton Lewis), Chicago, 111 Robert, Broye. 

leGrand, deMangueville, Jaudon 

April 11, 1898. .Gourdin, Annie Baskev.ille Douglas (Mrs. William 

Moultrie Gourdin), Charleston, S. C Robert, Broye, 

leGrand, deMangueville, Jaudon, 

April 21, 1900.. Clark, Mrs. J. Calhoun (l.avinia Duncan O'ClarkL 

Atlanta, Ga Robert, Broye, 

leGrand, deMangueville, Jaudon. 

M'ch 21, 1900. .Oswald, George Douglas, Charleston, S. C 

Robert, Broye, leGrand, deMan- 
gueville, Jaudon. 

April 15. 1907. .Morgan, Mrs. Georgia Lawton. Washington, D. C. . . 

Robert, Broye, leGrand, deMan- 
(jltei Hie. Jaudon. 



O . I cl II V_ 



LeSerurier, Gignilliat, DuRre, 

Leger, DuBliss. 
April 13, 1885 . . Bacot*, Daniel linger, Charleston, S. C Baeot. 

linger, dcSausstire, Motte. Pe- 

ronneau, Mcreier, Menessier, 

Moreau, Daleu. 
April 15, 1912.. Bacot, George Williams, Charleston, C. C Bacot, 

deSaussure, Pcronneau, Mereier, 

Menessier, Moreau, Daleu. 



62 

April 15, 1912. .Bacot, Miss Harriet Wainwright, Charleston, S. C. 

Bacot, Huger, deSaussure, Matte, 
Peronneau, Merrier, Menessier, 
MoreaUj Daleu. 

April 14, 1880.. Bacot, John Vacher, Morristown, N. J Baeot, 

Vacher, deSaussure, Peroiuieuu, 
Merrier, Mennessier, Moreau, 
Daleu. 

April 13. 1904 '.. Bacot, Jules deR N Savannah, Ga Bacot, 

deSaussure, Peronneau, Merrier, 
Menessier, Moreau, Daleu. 

April 15, 1912.. Bacot, Miss Julian Huger, Charleston, S. C Bacot, 

linger, deSaussure, Matte, Pe- 
ronneau, Mercier, Menessier, 
Moreau, Daleu. 

April 13, 1885. .Bacot*, Julius Motte, d. .. .Bacot, Finger, deSaussure, 

Matte, Peronneau, Mercier, 
Menessier, Moreau. Daleu. 

April 13, 1885. .Bacot*, Miss Maria Fraser, d Bacot, Peronneau, 

Merrier, Menessier, Moreau, 
Daleu. 

April 14, 1886.. Bacot, Robert Cochran, d Baeot. deSaussure, 

Peronneau, Merrier, Menessier, 
Moreau. Daleu 

April 13, 1885.. Bacot* Robert Dewar, Charleston, S. C, d 

Bacot, deSaussure, Peronneau, 
Mercier, Menessier, Moreau. 
Daleu 

.April 13, 1910.. Bacot, Robert Dewar, Charleston, S C Bacot, 

linger, deBerniere, deSaussure 
Motie, Peronneau. Mercier. 
Menessier, Moreau. Daleu 

April 13, 1904. .Bacot, Samuel Hollow-ay, d Bacot, Foissin, 

Peronneau, Mercier, Menessier, 
Moreau, Daleu. 

April 15. 1912. .Bacot, Mi-s Sarah Louisa, Charleston, S C 

Bacot, Huger, deSaussure. Matte, 
Peronneau. Mercier, Menessier, 
Moreau, Daleu. 

April 13, 1885.. Bacot*, Thomas Wright, Charleston, S. C Bacot, 

Huger, deSaussure, Motte, Pe- 
ronneau, Mercier, Menessier, 
Moreau. Daleu. 

April 13, 1899.. Bacot, Mrs. Thomas Wright (Louisa deBerniere). 

Charleston, S C. . . . .DeBerniere 



63 



April 5, 191)9. 



M'cli 31, 1890. 

April 15, 1912. 

April 13, 1905, 

April 18, 1909. 

April 14, 1890, 

April 17, 1902. 

April 13, 1885. 

April 13, 1910. 



April 20, 1906. 
April 17, 1902 



April 19, 1911. 

April 15, 1909. 
M'ch 8, 1895. 
April 14, 1890. 
Oct. 22, 1898. 
April 2, 1890. 
April 2, 1890. 
April 14, 1890. 
April 19, 1911. 

April 17, 1902. 

July 14, 1896. 
June 25, 1894. 



April 13, 1905 

April 2, 1885 

April 13, 1885, 

Nov. 4,1899. 



Ball, Mrs. Elias, Charleston, S. C. (Mary Wilson 

Ball) Ma.zyck, Raven el I.e 

Noble, dc St. Jitlieit, LeSerurier. 

Barker, Theodore G., Charleston, S. C Cordes, 

Gendron, Serre, Halliard. 

Barnes, Eva M., Atlanta, Ga Riverdiex. 

,Barr, Mrs. Mary McDonald Macon 

Bassett, Mrs. Caroline DuPuy, Winslow, Mo.. .DuPuy. 
La Villain, La Prade 

.Bayard, Hon. Thomas F., d Bayard. 

, Beekman, Julia Reese, Charleston, S. C Gras. 

, Beekman*, Serena B., Charleston, S. C Gras. 

BVckwith, Mrs. Videau Marion Legare, Charleston, 

S. C Legari, Marion, Gen- 
dron, Cordes, Porcher, deMar- 
boeuf, Cahusae, Mazycft, Coutu- 
rier. 

Belcher, Mrs. A. F. C, St. Louis, Mo Macon. 

.Bennett, Mrs. John M., San Antonio, Texas 

Bonneau, DuBliss, de Longue- 
mare, Roi. 
Berryman, Mrs. Charlotte Cazenove, Alexandria, \'a... 

dc Cazenove. 
Black, Miss Emma C, Charleston, S. C. .deLesleine. 

Blackshear, Mrs., Macon, Ga Gignilliat. 

Blackmail, Mrs. E. I.., Greenville, S. C Robert. 

Bondurant, Dr. E. 1)., Mobile, Ala DuBose. 

.Bonneau, F. N., Charleston, S. C Bonneau. 

.Bonneau, \V. E., Charleston, S. C Bonneau. 

. Bostick, A. McQ v Baniberg, S. C, d Robert. 

Bostick, Benjamin Robert, New York City, N. Y 

Robert. 

.Bounetheau, Harold DuPre, New York DuPre, 

Bounetheau 

Bounetheau, Henry 1)., d Bounetheau. 

.Bowley, Mrs. J. V. G., Jersey City, N. J DuPre, 

LeSerurier, Leger, Gignilliat, 
DuBliss. 

.Bowley, E. Ileyvvard DuPre, LeSerurier, Leger, 

Gignilliat. DuBliss. 

. Box*, Rosa, Charleston, S. C. /' Gaillard. 

Boykin*, Sarah J., Camden, S. C, d deSaussure. 

Bracey, Jean Charlemagne, editor Huguenot Quar- 
terly, Poughkeepsie, N. Y 

Bracey. 



6 4 

April 15, 1907 . . Bragonier, Fred Tyler, Globe, Arizona Peconier. 

April 20, 1906, .Brent, George A., Louisville, Ky Mouse. 

April 17, 1902. . Broun, Fontaine, Charleston, W. Va Boursequot, 

Fontaine. 
April 14, 1886. .Broun, Mrs. Mary M., Charleston, \V. Va., d 

Boursequot, Fontaine. 
April 14, 1886.. Broun, Thomas L., Charleston. W. Va Boursequot. 

Broun. 

July 2, 1903. . Brown, Dr. Paul R , d ... Richard, de Bruyn. 

June 11, 1898. . Brunson, 11. A., Florence, S. C Bacot, Foissin, 

Pvronneau, Mercber, Menessier, 

Moreau, Daleu. 
)\uw 11, 1898.. Brunson, II. M. Florence. S. C Bacot, Foissin, 

Pcronnea.it, Merrier, Menessier, 

Moreau, Daleu. 
April 20, 1906.. Brunson, Mrs. Mary Motte, Florence, S. C Bacot, 

Foissin, Pcronneau, Merrier, 

Me/ussier, Moreau, Daleu. 
April 15, 1912. .Brunson, Mason Chandler. Charleston, S. C 

Bacot, Foissin, Peronneau, Mer- 
rier, Menessier, Moreau, Daleu. 

April IS, 1912 .Bryan, I. aura Lane, Charleston, S. C Sherrard. 

April 13, 1905.. Bryan, Mrs. Mary Melver, Savannah, Ga Bacot, 

deSaitssure, Pcronneau, Merrier, 

Menessier, Moreau, Daleu. 
April 22, 19()8..Bryce, Mrs. Ellen Peter, Tuscaloosa. Ala Horry, 

I. a Roc he, Simons DuPre 
April 19, 1911.. Buffintoh, Mrs. M. Alton (formerly Mrs. Ellen 

Douglas Witherspoon, hall 

River, Mass Trabne, Guet- 

riint, Martin. 

April. 14, 1890,.Buist, Dr. J. Scmiers, Charleston, S. C. </ Leyare. 

MYh 21. 1903. . Bulloch. Dr. Jo>q.»h C... Washington, H C 

De) cans, Mauve. 

April 2, 1885. .BurcTell* Alice M., Charleston, S. C Marion. 

April 13, 1901. .BurdeH, 'Edwin T., Savannah, Ga Marion, 

Ravenel, Maz'y*ck. 

April 2. 1885. .Burdell* F. M., d • Marion. 

April 14, 1885. .Burdell*, Robert' F., d Marion. 

April 2, 1885. . Burdell*! Thad. S., d Marion. 

April 20, 1906.. Burnham, Edith R., Charleston, S. C Gras. 

April 2, 1901. .Burton. Robert F... Auburn, Ala Robert. 

April 19, 1911. .Butler, Jessie, Georgetown, S. C Bacot, Foissin, 

Pcronneau, Merrier, Menessier, 

Moreau, Daleu. 



6 S 



April 19, 1911. .Butler, LeRoy H., Georgetown, S. C. .Bacot, Foissin, 

Peronneau, Merrier, Menessier, 

Moreau, Daleu. 
April 13, 1904. . li'mk-r. Mrs. Jessie T Bacot, Foissin, Peronneau, 

Merrier, Menessier, Moreau, Da- 
leu. 
April, 1909. .Butler, Miss Louise Screven, Los Angeles, Cal 

Robert. 

April 13, 1885.. Caldwell*, Win. Robinson, d Thomas. 

April 13, 1885. .Campbell*, Miss Celia, d Sigoumey, Ger- 

maine, Paijran, Simons, DuPre. 
April 13, 1885. .Campbell*, Mary Bennett, Charleston, S. C, d.Sigour- 

uey, Germaine, Pairan, DuPre. 

April 13, 1885. .Campbell*, Mary Butler, d Sigoumey, Pairan. 

April 13, 1885. . Carrere*, Mrs. Elizabeth Calhoun, d Segur. 

April 15, 1912. .Carson, James Petigrew, Charleston, S. C Gibvrt. 

April 13, 1903. .Charles, Robert K.. d DuBose. 

April 12, 1899.. Chase, John A., Florence, S. C Bacot, Foissin, 

Peronneau, Merrier, Menessier, 

Moreau, Daleu. 
April 13, 1903. .Cheves, Mrs. C. McCord, Charleston. S. C. .Turquand. 
April 10, 1890. .Chisolm, Dr. J. Bachman, Charleston, S. C.Gendron, 

I 'no lea,:. 
April 11, 1890. . Chisolm, Henry Louis, Charleston, S. C, d . . .Gendron, 

Prioleau. 
April 13. 191)5.. Clarke, James \V.. Utica, N. V LeGrand, Roberts. 

Bocquet. 
April 21, 1900.. Clark, Mrs. J. Calhoun, Atlanta, Ga Brauye, 

Jaudon, LeGrand. 
April 13, 1903. Clarkson, Heriot, Charlotte, N. C. Simons, Horry, 

LaRoehe, DuPre, Marion. 
April 13, 1903. Clearwater, Hon. Alphonso L. I. in. Baudoin. 

HridoH, Corijuet, Doian, (Heyo). 

Xieol, Segnine, I ' ernooye. 
April 13, 1888.. Clement J. \V. Legare, young's Island, S. C. d 

legate. 
April 13, 1905. .Colcock, Charles Jones. Charleston, S. C Marion. 

Baluet. 
April 13, 1901. .Colcock, Daniel deSaussure, \ T ew Orleans, La 

Bacot, deSaussure, Peronneau, 

Merrier, Menessier, Moreau, 

Daleu. 

April 15, 1907.. Cole, Miss Edith G., Alleghany, Pa laquett. 

April 13. 1904.. Collins, Mrs. Lucy G., Charleston. W. Va Horry. 

April 13, 1901. .Connerat, William H., Jr., Savannah, Ga Robert. 



66 

April 19, 1911.. Connor, Mrs. Charlotte C. Hall, Brooklyn, X. V 

LeSeurrier, Leger, Tresevant, 

Maulard, Poyas, Gendron, Ma- 

syck. 

April 20, 1906.. Cooper, W. B., Wilmington, N. C Jeanerette. 

April 13, 1904.. Cooper, Noah W.., Nashville, Tenn., r Jeanerette. 

April 15, 1907.. Cole, Charles L., Alleghany, Peim., l.m Jaquett. 

April 18, 1909. .Conies, Alexander Watson, Sr., Charleston, S. C 

Cordes. 

April 13, 1885. .Coste* A. L., d Coste. 

April 13, 1885.. Coste*, R. C, Charleston, S. C Coste. 

Oct. 29, 1899 . . Coutant, Dr. Richard B., Tarrytown, N. V Couiant. 

April 17, 1902. .Cummings, Mrs. Rosa W., Charleston, S. C... Bonne- 

theau, Legare. 

April 13/ 1905. .Cunningham. Miss Sarah Gibert. 

April 13, 1910. .Cuthbert, Mrs Eloise Waties Mayrant, Sumter, S. C, 

May rant, Guignard, DeLeiseline, 

Gaillard, Paparel, Le Seruner. 

April 13, 1885.Xuttino*, David B., Rock Hill, S. C Cothoneau. 

Ai>ril 19, 1911 . . Cuttino, John S„ Columbia, S. C Kathouueau. 

April 13, 1905..Dabney, Mrs. E. B.. Vicksburg, Miss Huguenin, 

Robert. 

April 13, 1910. .Davant, C. F., Tucson, Arizona.... Davant. 

April 2, 1885. .Davant, J. C, Barnwell, S. C Davant. 

April 13, 1902. .Davisson, Mrs. Rhena' Witte, Charleston, S. C 

Bouuetheau, Legare. 
M'cli 21, 1890.. Dawson, N. 11. R., d Huger, Motte. Conies, 

Perdriau, Rassin or Rufin, 

Richet. 
April 13, 1910. .Delaplaine, Louis S„ Wheeling, W. Va...de la Plaine. 
July 12, 1897 DkRichemond, Louis Mi.miiinii, Archiviste'de La 

Rochelle, France. 

April 7. 1890. .DeRosset, A. T.. r DeRosset 

April 7, 1890. .DeRosset, Wm., r DeRosset. 

April 18, 1885.. DeSaussure, Fannie F., Charleston, S. C, d ..DeSaus- 

uire. 
April 2, 1885. .DeSaussure* Henry A., Charleston, S. C, d 

DeSaussure, Gourdin. 

April 2, 1885. .DeSaussure*, Dr. Henry W„ d DeSaussure. 

April 2, 1885. .DeSaussure 1 , Dr. Henry W., Jr., d DeSaussure 

April 2, 1885.. DeSaussure* Isabel A., Charleston, S. C DeSaus- 
sure, Gourdin. 

April 14, 1890. . DeSaussure, James P., d DeSaussure, Peronneau. 

April 2, 1885. . DeSaussure*, John R DeSaussure, Gourdin. 

April 13, 1885. . DeSaussure 1 ', Louis 1)., (/ DeSaussure. 



6; 



April 13, 1885.. DeSaussure* Louis I)., Jr., New York, N. Y., d .... 

DeSaussure. 
April 2, 1885.. DeSaussure* Mrs. Martha (., Charleston, S. C 

Gourdin. 
April 2, 1885. .DeSaussure*, Martha G., Charleston, S. C, d 

Gourdin. 
April 2, 1885. .DeSaussure*, Martha G., (/ ... .DeSaussure, Gourdin. 

April 2, 1885. . DeSaussure*, Mary C, (/ • Peronneau. 

April 13, 1885. .DeSaussure*, Mrs. Sarah E., Charleston, S. C 

DeSaussure. 

April 2, 1885. .DeSaussure*, Sarah P., Charleston, S. C, d 

* DeSaussure, Gourdin. 

April 2, 1885. . DeSaussure*, P. G., d Gourdin, DeSaussure. 

April 13, 1903. . DeSaussure, William P., Richmond, Va. ..DeSaussure. 

April 2, 1885.'. DeSaussure*, Wilmot G., d DeSaussure. 

April 2, 1885. . DeSaussure*, Wilmot G., Jr., r . .DeSaussure, Gourdin. 

July 12, 1897. . DeVeaux, Henri, Bordeaux, France DeVeaux. 

Feb. 2, 1887. . Dibble, Samuel, Orangeburg, S. C Gabeau. 

April 15, 1907. . Doar, David, Santee, S. C Guides. 

April 15, 1907.. Doar, Mrs. Ulric Huguenin, Lakeland, Lla Gardes. 

May 4, 1897. . DuBose, Miss Mary P., Monteagle, Tenn. ..DuBose, 

Peronneau. 
April 22, 1897. .DuBose, Robert M., Sevvanee, Tenn DuBose. 

Pore her. 
May 14, 1897. .DuBose, Rev. W. Haskell, Monteagle, Tenn 

DuBose, Peronneau, Porcher. 
April 22, 1897.. DuBose, Rev. W. P., D. D., Sewanee, Tenn.. .DuBose. 

Porcher. 
May 4, 1897. . DuBose, Miss Susan P., Monteagle, Fenn.. ... .DuBose. 

Peronneau, Porcher. 

April 15, 1907.. DuBose, Miss Willie S., Savannah, Ga DuBose. 

April 22, 1908.. DuBose, Miss Louisa, Athens, Ga DuBose, 

April 13, 1885.. Due*, Miss P. M , Charleston, S. ('., I. m iuber. 

Nov. 15, 1897. .Dunbar, Mrs. J. R., KUenton, S. C Ilct, Geudron, 

Chardon, Motte, Prioleau. 
April 13, 1910. .Duncan, Mrs. Eddie House, Houston, Tex. . . Legare, 

De la Haute. 
April 13, 1894— Dunkin, W. 11., Charleston, S. C. . . ... Hnger, Broun, 

Gardes, Perdriau, Russia or 

Rufin, Rieliet. 
April 13, 1902. .DuPre, Belin Clarke, Columbia, S. C....Belin, DuPre 

May 24, 1898. .DuPre. Prof. J. F. C, d ■ DuPre. 

April 13, 1909. .Durant, Mrs. Nannie Miles, Charleston, S. C.Bierne 
April 15, 1907. .Dwight, D. C, Charleston, S. C, ^.Marion, 

Baluet, Gaillard. 



68 

April 15, 1907. .Dwight, Dr. R. Y.. Pinopolis, S. C Marion. Baluet, 

April 15, 1907. .Dwight, Henry R Marion, Baluet, Ravenel. Ue St. 

Juliai, Macyeh, LcNoblc, Le 

Serurier, Porcher. 
June 6, 1899.. Ellis, Frampton E„ Atlanta, Ga llet, Gendron, 

Chardon, Motte, Prioleau. 
Nov. 1, 1897.. Ellis, Mrs. Phoebe P., Atlanta, Ga Gendron, 

Chardon, Motte, I'rioleau. 

Nov. 1, 1897.. Ellis, Prioleau, Atlanta, Ga Prioleau. 

April 19, 1911. . Erm ant rout, Miss Adelaide Louise Washington, 

Reading, Penn de liar re 

April 13, 1910. .Evans, Emma Crandall, Sedalia, Mo Bouton. 

April 15, 1912.'.Faison, Airs. J. Iv, Bennettsville, S. C Milner, 

Legare, 

April 1'3, l8?4..Faulker, Mrs. M. G., New York, N. Y Gaillard. 

April 20, 1906, .Finger, Watson Cordes, Charleston, S. C Cordes. 

April 20, 1906. .Finger, Mrs. C. V>. C., Charleston, S. C Cordes. 

M'ch 29, 1889..Fishburne, Mrs. Helen M„ Summerville, S. C 

Marion, Muzyck. 
April 20, 1906. .Fishburne, Miss Caroline D'Arcy, Washington, D. 

C 1'oslell, Pepin. 

April 20, 1906. .Fishburne, Benjamin Postell, Washington, D. C 

Postell, l J cpin. 

April 13, 1894. .FitzSimons, W. Huger, Charleston, S. C, r ..Gaillard. 
April 13. 1904. .Farley, Mrs. Sarah C. (.'.. Hutto, Texas .. Bonneau, Rot. 

Oct. 30, 1885. . Fludd, Mrs. Eliza K.. d Legare 

April- 22, 1908. .Ford, Mrs. Marion J., d PorJier. 

April 13, 1905.. Ford. Mrs. M. A. Lucas, ( F. W.), Georgetown. 

S. C I lorry, linger. 

April 15, 1889. . Foster, Henry 1'., Summerville, S. C, r Poyas. 

Gendron. 

May 30, 1890. .Frost, E. Horry, d . . . LeJau, Horry. 

April 13, 1899. .Frost, Frank Ravenel, Charleston, S. C Ravenel, 

LeJau, Uorry, de St. J alien. 

April 13, 1904.. Frost; Dr. F. LeJan LeJau, Uorry. 

Aug. 7. 1899. .Frost, Mrs. W . Rranford (Emma), Charleston, S. C... 

linger, Cordes, Pcrdriau, Russia, 

or Rufin, Richet. < 
May 30, 1890. . Gaillard, Col. D. DuBose, Duluth. Minn. . • . . . Jolain, 

LeClair, Gaillard, DuBose, Gen- 
dron, Baluet, Boyd. 
April 13, 1910.. Gaillard, David St. Pierre, Culebra, Canal Zone.... 

Gaillard. 

April 21, 1900. .Gaillard, Miss F. G., Charleston, S. C Gaillard. 

May 30, 1890. . Gaillard, Henry T., St. Augustine, F\z.. ... ..Gaillard. 



6 9 



July 12, 1897. .Gaillard, John, Mobile, Ala Goillard. 

April 2, 1885.. GAILLARD* P. C, d Gaillard, Porcher. 

de Cherigny, Maz$ck, LeSerurier 

April 13, 1891.. Gaillard, Miss Rebecca T. ( Charleston, S. C, d, 

Gaillard 

April 19, 1911. .Gaillard, Mrs. Maria Ravenel. Charleston, S. ( . 

Ravenel, DeVeaiix, Mas'yck, St. 

J alien, LeSerurier, Le Noble, 

Porchef. 
Dec. 1, 1887.. Gaillard, S. Gourdin, New Cumberland, W. Va. 

Gaillard, De R'nhebourg, Gour- 
din, Porcher. 
April 13, 1903. .Gai'l lard, Dr. VV. Minot, Georgetown, S. C. . .Gaillard. 

April 13, 1904. .Gaillard, George Caldwell, Mobile, Ala Gaillard. 

April 20, 1906.,. Gaillard, Miss F.llinor i\, Pinopolis, S. C Gaillard. 

July 14, 1897.. Gaillard, Samuel P., Mobile, Ala DeRichebourg, 

Porcher, Gendron, Masyck. 

April 13, 1901.. Gaillard, Wm. D., New York, N. Y Gaillard 

April 2, 1885. .Gaillard*, Wm. H. 1)., d Gaillard. 

July 16, 1897.. Gaillard, Win. M., Mobile, Ala Gaillard 

April 22, 1908.. Gait, Mrs. Mary J., Williamsburg Va Servient. 

April 15, 1912..Gibbs, James Poyas, Charleston, S. C Poyas 

April 2, 1885..Gibert*, J. A., Abbeville, S. C Gibert. 

April 20, 1906. .Gignilliat, L. R GignilLat, Leger, LeSerurier. 

April 11, 1898. .Gourdin. Mrs. A. B., Charleston, S. C, LeGrand 

Jaudun, Urouye, Robert. 

April 2, 1885. .Gourdin*, John K., Charleston, S. C, d Gourdin. 

April 2, 1885. .Gourdin*, R. N., Charleston, S. C, d Gourdin. 

April 15, 1912. .Cranberry, Mrs. Mary Lee Brown, Jackson, Miss 

La Force. 
April 13, 1905.. Greer, Mrs. Mary P., New Castle, Penn., d. .Poinsett. 
April 19, 191 1 . .Gresbam, Mrs. Josephine Mann, Galveston, Texas....' 

Pickens 

April -9. 1890. .Griinke, Dr. 1\ S., Charleston. S. C, </ Faucheraud. 

April 2, 1885. .Gnerard*, Dr. A. R., Flat Rock, N. C Guerard. 

July 24, 1890. .Gnerard, E. P., Cbarleston, S. C Gaillard. Godin, 

Guerard. Macyek, LeSerurier. 

April 13, 1901. .Guerard, Mrs. E. P . Charleston, S. C Beueset. 

April 13, 1885. .Guerard*, Win. Bull, d Guerard. 

April 2, 1901 . .Guerard, Wm. Elliott, Savannah, Ga. d Mazyek, 

Gnerard, LeSerurier, Godin. 
May 13, 1899. .Guignard, John G., Columbia, S. C Guignard, 

DeLeslciue. 
Jan. 30, 1899. .Guignard, Capt. Win. S., West Point, N. Y.. .Guignard, 

DeLesleitte. 



7° 

May 30, 1890. .Guilleteau, Peter L Guilleteau. 

July 12, 1897.. Haig, M. de Lisle, Charleston, S. C dc la Motte, 

Chastaiyner, Masyck, Buretel, 

dc St. J ulien, LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1902.. Haig, Miss Mary Motte, Charleston, S. C.de la Matte, 

Chastaigner, Maztyck, Buretel, dc 

St. J ulicn, LeSerurier. 
Oct. 30, 1885.. Hall, Harriet ()., Columbus, S. C, d ..Huyer, Motte, 

Cordcs, Perdriau, Russia or 

Rutin, Richct. 
April 15, 1912.. Hall, Mrs. Lillian Popenoe, Lawrence, Kansas 

Papincau. 
April 15, 1007. .Hamby, Mrs. Elizabeth McN.. Columbia, S. C 

Gail lard, Sore, 

May 1, 1897.. Hamilton, J. S., Mobile, Ala Gaillard. 

May 30, 1890..HarJestou, John, Charleston, S. C Huger, 

Cordcs, Perdriau, Rassin or 

Rutin, Richct. 
April 13. 1904. .Harrison, Mrs. James Randolph, New York, N. V. 

Stuyvesant, Bayard. 

April 13, 1902. .Hayne, P. Trapier, Greenyille, S. C DuGue, 

T rapier. 

April 15, 1909..Hillhouse, Rev. J. B., ' Abbeville, S. C Gibert. 

April 14, 1890.. Hill. Mrs. Jane L., Charleston, S. C Gibert. 

April 22, 1908. .Hodgkins, Mrs. Marie \V., Washington, D. C. 

. .• DuPuy, Lcl ' illier. 

April 13, 1910. . Holliday, Jaquelin Smith, Indianapolis, lnd., lacquelin. 

April .13, 1899. .Holmes, George S., Charleston, S. C Peronneau. 

April 13, 1899. .Holmes, James C, Charleston, S. C, r ... .Peronneau. 

April 13, 1885. . Holmes*, Rebecca T:., d Peronneau. 

April 12, 1890..Horlbeck, Dr. H. B., d Porcher, de Chcriyuy. 

April 2, 1908. .Houghton, Mrs. Delia B., Atlanta. Ga Porcher. 

DeCheriyny, DuPre. 
June 11, 1896.. Huger, Benjamin, Charleston, S. C r Huger, 

liraiiu, Cordcs. Perdriau, Rassin 
or Rutin, Richct. 
April 2. 18.S5. . linger*, Cleland Kinloeh" Huger, Charleston, S. C, d. 

Huyer, Cordcs. Perdriau, Ras- 
sin or Rutin, Richct. 

M'ch 8, 1890.. Huger, Francis K., Knoxville. Teun. Huger, 

Cordcs, Perdriau. Rassin or 
Rutin, Richct. 
April 13, 1898 .Huger, Miss Mary Esther, New Orleans. La.. . Huger, 

De Pencil, Cordcs, Perdriau, Ras- 
sin or Rufin. Richct. 



7' 

Sept. 5, 1898.. linger, Mrs. Sabina H., Charleston, S. C linger, 

Cordes, I'o di nut , Rassin or 

Rutin, Richct. 
April 13, 1903..Huger, Alfred, Charleston, S. C Huger, Broun, 

Cor des, Perdriau, Rassin or 

RuHn, Kit Int. 
April 14,. 1890.. H tiger, Win. E., Charleston, S. C Huger, 

Cordes, Perdriau, Rassin or 

Rutin, Richct. 
April 13. 1885.;Huger*, Dr. Wm. II.. Charleston. S. C, d....Hugcr, 

Broun , Cordes, Perdriau, Rassin 
t or Rujin, Richct. 

April 12, 1899. .Huguenin, David, Charleston, S. C, r Huguenin. 

Feb. 2, 1888. . Huguenin, Hiomas A., d Huguenin. 

April 20, 1906. .Hnmbird, David, Hudson, Wis. /. m., Humbert. 

April 20, 1906. . Ilnmbird, James L. Pittsburg, Pa., /. m Humbert. 

April 13, 1910. .Hurin, James II., Los Angeles Cal Trabue. 

April 13, 1903.. Hoyt, Miss L. R., Camden, S. C Gaillard. 

April 13, 1903.. Hoyt, Mrs. Rebecca C, Columbia, S. C Gaillard. 

April 13, 1910. Jackson, Miss Elizabeth Walker, Bennettsville, S. C, 

Duval I. 

April 22, 1908.. Jenkins, C. Bissell, Charleston, S.X Gauticr. 

Sept. 5, 1898. .Jennings, Mrs. William, Atlanta, Ga., r . .... .linger, 

Broun, Cordes, Perdriau, Rassin 

or Rufin, Richct. 
April 21, 1900. .Jervey, Miss Amaryllis, Charleston, S. C Maz$ck, 

LeSeruricr, LcNoble, Ravcnel, dc 

St. Julicn, I'oslcll. 
April 13, 1893..Jervey, Miss E. D., Charleston, S. C Maz$ck, 

LeSeruricr, Le.\'oble, Ravcnel, de 

St. Julicn, I' os tell. 

Oct. 30, 1885. .Jervey, Eugene P., Charleston, S. C Postell. 

Oct. 30, 1885. .Jervey, Jam.:. I., d \lacycL\ Ravenel, De St. Julicn, 

Pastcll 
April 13, 1885. .Jervey*, Rene K., tt . . \la:\\L\ Raic'uel, dc Si. Julicn. 

Postell 
April 13, 1885. .Jervey*, Wm. St. Julien, Charleston, S. C \faz$ck, 

LeSeruricr, Ravencl, de St. Julien, 

LeNoble, Postell. 
Jan. 17, .1890. Johnson, Rev. John, D. D., Charleston, S. C, d, 

Bonneau. 

Oct. 30, 1885. Johnson, William, d Bonneau. 

April 19, 1911. Johnson, Mrs. Fannie Carr, Mexico, Mo. . .I'crroncttc. 
April 15, 1912. Johnson, Mrs. Lois Beavers, Indianapolis, lnd 

Dul'uy. 



7- 

April 13, 1902. Johnstone, Mrs. Fanny I.., Mobile. Ala Lesesne. 

April 13, 1904. .Johnstone, Miss Isabel F. f Georgetown. S. C de 

Marbeuf, DeSaussure. 
April 13, 1905.. Johnstone, Miss Emma K .. Baltimore, Md... deMarbeuj 

Oct. 30, 1885.. Jones, Ella II. Charleston, S. C Sigur. 

Oct. 30, 1885.. Jones, Miss Lottie M., Charleston, S. C Sigur. 

April 13, 1902. .Jordan, Miss Mary D., Chattanooga. Term., r ..Motte, 

Huger. 

April 15, 1909. .Keels, Annie Olivia, Remberf, S. C deRichebourg 

April '22, 1908.. Kendrick, Mrs. Julia Lawton, Philadelphia, l'a d 

Robert 

April 2, 1885.*. Kershaw*, Rev. John. Charleston, S. C, r .DuBose. 
April 2, 1885.. Kershaw* Mrs. Susan D, Charleston, S. C, r 

t/i' Sciussure, Gonrdin. 
April 15 1909. . Kidd, Mrs. Lelia Major, Sedalia, Mo DuPuy 

Flour ftdy, Trabue, 1 el' Main, 
June 8, 1899. .King, Edward Postell, Atlanta, Ga Gignilliat, 

LeSeru'rier, Porcher, Postell, Du- 

Pri, Pelot. 
April 13, 1903.. King, Mitchell, d Gignilliat, LeSerurier, Porcher, 

Postell,, DuPre, Pelot. 
April 13, 1904. .Kirk, Robert J., King-tree. S. C. .Couturier, Dalbiac. 
April 19, 1911. .Knight, Mrs. Caroline O. \ T icholasvilk-, K*\ 

Uupuy, i mlnte. 
April 13, 1904.. Knox, Miss Mattie E., Charleston, S. C \las$ck, 

LeSerurier, Raveuel, LeNoble, de 

St. J alien. 
April 19, 1911 . .Kopperl, Mrs, Waldine Zipleman, Galveston, Texas.. 

Pap ay. 

April 5, 1890. . Langley, P. C, Charleston, S. C Prioieau. 

Sept. 23, 1898.. Langley. P. G., Jr., Charleston, S. C Prioieau 

April 7, 1890. .Langley, Samuel, d Prioieau. 

Feb. 15, 1807.;i.utta, Mis. Hat'tie X, Charlotte, X. C, r ...Legardere 

April 13. 18S5. . 1. aureus," I Kin \ K., Charleston, S C lumens 

April 13, 1902.. Laurens, Mrs. II. K., Charleston, S. C Simons, 

Masyk; Le Noble, St. Julien, 
de Ckastaigner, Iht Pre. Le 
Soulier, Buretel, DeLisle. 

Oct. 30, 1885. .Lawrence, Mrs. Hannah A., d de St. Julien 

April 14,. 1890. .Lawton, General Alex. R .. Savannah, Ga., d... Robert. 

Mar. 15, 1898. .Lawton, Alex. R., Jr., Savannah, Ga Robert 

April 15, 1912. .Lawton, Alexander Robert, Savannah, Ga.. . ". Robert. 
Oct. 30, 1885. .Lawton. Mrs. Cecilia, Charleston. S. C LeGrand. 

Brauye, Jaudou, Robot. 
April 15, 1912.. Lawton. Mis.s Florence Iney, Estill, S. C Robert. 



73 

April 11, l«98..Lawtoh, St. John Alison. Charleston, S. C Robert. 

April 15, 1907..Lafaye, Mrs. Charlotte Cordes Lucas. Columbia. 

S. C Cordes. Mazyck, 

LeSena ier, Leger, de St. Julien. 

April 15, 1909. .LeCompte, Margaret J., Lexington, Ky LeCompte. 

April 13, 1910. .Legare, Mrs. Eliza Catherine, Charleston. S. C 

Marion. 
April IS, 1909 ; . Legare, P. T., Charleston, S. C Marion, Gendron, 

Cordes, Porcher, deMarbeouf, 

Cahusac, Mazyck, Couturier. 

April 13, 1885. .Legare,* Dr. Thomas, d , Legate 

April 13, 1904. .LeGyand, Janus Hutchinson. Tyler, Texas. .LeGraitd. 
Feb. 21, 1900.. Lewis, Mrs. Rosa L. 1)., Chicago, 111.. Brauye, 

Juitdon, LcGrand, Robert. 

April 22, 1908. .Lewis, A. P., Chicago, 111 Porcher, deCherigny. 

April 15, 1907. .Lewis, Anne Porcher, Clemson College, S. C. Porcher, 

deCherigny. 
April 13, 1902. .Lining, Mrs. Ida M., Charlestpn, S. C, d ....L'Escoti 

Jan. 24, 1900. .Lock wood, Mrs. J. Palmer, Charleston, S. C 

V ergereau, Boitd'nio?, Posted. 
April 15, 1907.. Long, Mrs. Martha DuPre Gaillard, Si. Louis, Mo., 

Gaillard, DuPre. 

April 13, 1910.. Long, William Ballard, Indianapolis, Ind Trabtie, 

Daniel. G iterant. Martin, Dabney, 
Maupin. 
April 13, 1910.. Long, Mrs. Elizabeth .Ballard, Indianapolis, Ind 

Dabney, Maupin. 
April 13, 1910.. Long, William Dudley, Indianapolis, Ind Trabue, 

Daniel, G iterant, Martin. 
April 15, 1903. .Loomis, Henry P., New York. N. V . . . Houdinot. Carre. 

April 20, 1906.. Lucas, Mrs. Mary R„ Georgetown, S. C Cordes. 

April 17, 1890.. Lucas, J. J., Society Hill, S. C Simons, DuPre 

April 13. 1902. .Lucas, Thos. S., Savannah, Ga DuPre, Simons 

April 13, 1902.. Lucas, \V P., Laurens, S C. d DuPre, Simons 

June 22, 1897. . Macbeth, Malcolm, St. Louis, Mo., d..de Chastaigner, 

Ravcnel, Gaillard, Cordes. 
April 20, 1906. .Macbeth, Ravenel, Boise City, Idaho . .....Raven el, 

Gaillard, Cordes, dc Chastaigner. 
April 13, 1893. .Manigault, Arthur M., Charleston, S. C. . . . .Manigault, 

Oct. 13, 1885. .Manigault, Edward, r Manigault, Mazyck. 

Oct. 29, 1885. .Manigault, Eliza S., r Manigault 

Dec. 29, 1889.. Manigault', Dr. Gabriel P., d Manigault 

July 27 1889. .Manigault, Henry M., Charleston, S. C, d ..Manigault 

July 4, 1897. .Manigault. Joseph, Savannah, Ga. d Manigault 

Oct 30. 1885. .Manigault, Louis, d Manigault 



74 

pet. 30, l885..Manigault, Mary M . r Manigault, Mazyck. 

Nov. 2, 1895.. Marion, E. B., Charleston, S. C Mm ion 

April 21, 1900. .Matthews, Mrs. E. P., Charleston, S. C Peronneau 

April 13, 1905.. Mason, Mrs. Louisa, K, d • Sore. 

April 15, 1909.. Maury, Anne Herndon, Richmond, Va., I. in. ..Maury. 

ae la Fontaine. 

June 1, 1899.. Maury, M. F„ Richmond, Va., d Maury, 

de In Fontaine. 

June 1, 1899.. Maury, Col. Richard 1... Richmond, Va., d Maury, 

de la Fontaine. 

April 13, 1904..Maupin, Miss Sallie W., Baltimore, Md Maupin. 

April 13, 1904. .Maupin, Miss Margaret L., Baltimore, Md.. .Maupin. 
April 13, 19l0. .Mayrant, Miss Caroline Kinloch, Summerviile, S. C... 

May rant, Guignard, De Lcsselin, 
Gaillard, Paparel, LeSernrier. 

April 13, 1910. .Mayrant, Miss Harriet S., Summerviile S. C 

Simon, Dupre, Le Serurier, Lc- 
Ger, Mazyck, DuBose, DuGui. 

April 13, 1510. .Mayrant, W. R., Summerviile, S. (' Mayrant, 

Guignard, DcLessclin , Gaillard, 
Paparel, Leger, LeSernrier. 

Oct. 30, 1885. .Mazyck, Alexander II.. Charleston, S. C Mac'yck, 

Chastaigner, Gaillard, Le Seru- 
rier. 

April 13, 1899.. Mazyck, Miss Arabella, Charleston, S. C tiaz'yck, 

Porcher, de St. Julicn, de 
Chastaigner, Le Serurier. 

April 13, 1905. .Mazyck, Miss Arabella S Mazyck, Porcher, de St. 

J alien, LeSernrier, de Chastaigner. 
April 2, 1885. .Mazyck,- Arthur, Charleston, S. C. .Mazyck, /'archer, 

de St. Julicn, de Chastaigner. 
Le Serurier. 
April 13, 1894. .Mazyck. Miss Catherine B., Charleston, S. C... Mazyck, 

Porcher, de St. Julicn, de Chas 
taigncr, 1 e Serurier. 
April 13, 1885. .Mazyck.* Edmund, d ..Mazyck. Porcher, de St. Jnlieu. 

de Chaistaigner, LeSernrier. 
April n, 1892.. Mazyck, Mrs. Epps Parker. (Arthur), Charles- 
ton, S. C Mazyck, Ravend', LcScrurier 

April 13, 1902.. Mazyck, Miss Ethel, Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

de Chastaigner, Gaillard, Le 
Serurier. 
April 2, 1885. .Mazyck/- Isaac, Charleston, S. C. .Mazyck, Porcher, 

de St: Julicn, Le Serurier, de 
Chastaigner. 



75 



April 15, 1899. .Mazyck, Miss Marion, Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

de ( hastaigncr, Gaillard, Le 
Seruricr. 

April 13, 1910., Mazyck, McM. K., Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

Porcher, de St. Julien, LeSeru- 
rier, de Cltastaigner. 
April 7, 1890. .Mazyck, Philip P., Charleston, S. C. .Mazyck, Porcher, 

dc St. Julien, Le Seruricr, de 
Chastaigtter. 
April 13, 1902.. Mazyck, Mrs. Pierre (formerly Miss llulda Witte), d 

Bouncthcau, Legare. 

April 13, 1885.. Mazyck,* Stephen, d Mazych\ Ravencl, Le Noble, 

Le Seruricr, dc St, Julien. 

April 13, 1902. .Mazyck, Miss Vallee, Charleston, S. C Mazyck, Le 

Seruricr, Chastaigtter, Gaillard 

April 13, 1885.. Mazyck,* Win. Gaillard, Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

dc Chasiaigner, Gaillard, Le 
Seruricr. 

April 20, 1906. .Mdzytk, Win. G. Jr., Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

Gaillard, dc Chastaigtter', I.cSc- 
ruricr. 

Jan. 11, 1890. .Mazyck, Win. St. Julien, d Maz'yck, Pcrcher, de St. 

Julien, Le Seruricr, dc Chas- 
taigtter. 

April 2, 1901..McComb, Mrs. Anna L., New Castle, Pa., d Le 

Seruricr, Mazyck, Godin, 

Guerard. 

April 7, 1885..McCrady, Edward, Charleston. S. C, d . . .DcPcrnicrc. 

April 2, 1885..McCrady,* Louis del'. .Charleston, S. C, d.De Bermere 

April 15, 1903. .McGowan, Mrs. C. P., Charleston, S. C, r .Perotineau. 

April 19, lSlK.McElroy, Mrs. Mary Hardy, Kansas City, Mo 

I hi (my. 
April 15, l905..Mcher, Claudia B. (Mrs. G. W. Mclver), Charles- 
ton. S. C... Bounctheau, 

Simons. DuP'rc. 
April 22, 1908.. McMillan, Mrs. Hess Porcher, Atlanta, Ga. . . . Porcher, 

deCherigny. 

April 15, 1909. .Memminger, C. Gustavus, Lakeland, Fia Mazyck, 

Porcher, de St. Julien, LcScruri- 
cr, dc Chastaigtter. 

Jan. 13, 1890.. Memminger, R. W., Jr., Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

Porcher. dc St. Julien, Le 
Seruricr, dc Chastaigtter. 



7 G 



Feb 



April 
April 
April 

April 

April 
Nov. 
April 



April 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 

April 

April 
April 
April 
April 
April 

Sept. 

Nov. 
April 
April 

Fob. 

April 
April 
April 

April 
April 
April 

April 



20, 1895. .Memmmger, Mrs. Susan M. f Charleston, S. C 

Masyck, PorcHer, de St. Jul ten, 
LcScrurier, </<■ ( luislaigtwr. 

15, 1907..Messerole, J, V., Brooklyn. N Y.. d Uesserol* 

13, 1885. .Meynardie,* Rev. E.J., d Meynardie 

15, 1909..Michaux, Marie Ella, Bennettsville, S. C Wichaux. 

15, 1903..Middleton, Mrs. Henry 1., Charleston, S. (' (formerly 

Miss Betty \\. Miles) Bierne. 

15, .1903. .Miles, Miss Margaret M., Flat Rock, N. C, d ..Bierne. 

2, 1895.. Miles, Mrs. Mary Peronneau, d Peronneau. 

15, 1909. .Miles, Mrs. Roberta Lawrence Hall, Charleston, 

S. C Masyck, LeSerurier, 

Gendron, Poyas. 
13, 1902.. Miles, Sarah A., Charleston. S. C.MazycL', Porcher, 

de St. Julie u, l.e Ser iincr, de 
Chastijigner. 

13, 1910.. Miller, Anna M., Adrian, Mich Branaugh 

13, 1910.. Miller, Mrs. Edna Keels de Richbourg. 

13, 1904. .Miller, Miss Mary C Cothonneau, l.egare. 

14, 1890. .Miller, W. C, Charleston, S. C. ....Legal e, Cothonneau 
13, 1885. .Milnor,* Mrs. E. M., Charleston, S. C d Legate 

( othonneau. 
13, 1902.. Mitchell, Mrs, Pearl Maury, Bessemer, Ala . .'. . Maury 

i'oiiUiiue, 

15, 1903. .Mitchell, Edgar L., Bessemer, Ala Maury. 

19, 1911.. Moody, Mrs. Lihbie Shearn, Galveston, Texas ..Arge 

13, 1885.. Morris,- C. Ellis, r Masyck, RavencU l.e Koble 

15, 1907.. Morse, Marion K., New York. \ T . Y Serre 

15, 1907.. Morgan, Mrs. Georgia Lawton, Washington, 1). C... 

lirauye, LcGraud, Jaudon, Robert 
22, 1897. .Motte, Rev, John YV., Eutawvilie, S. C Moite 

16, 1897.. Motte, John W, Jr.-, Savannah, Ga Mutt, 

13, 1905. .Mou/.on. Lawrence . . . Mou^on 

13 1904. Alunio, Mrs Elizabeth H., Charleston, S. C 

• Manigault. 

10, 1900. Myers, Frank K., Charleston, S. C deRosset. 

13, 1910.. Myers, Thomas E., Charleston, S. C deRosset. 

2, 1885. . Neufville,* Anna C, Charleston, S. C Neufville 

2,1 1885. .Neufville,* B. K., Charleston, S. C, d Neufville 

2, 1885. .Neufville/' II. S., d Xenfville 

2, 1885. . Neufville,* Julia V., rf Neufville 

13, 1902. .Noble, Mary. Miss. Galveston. Texas. .. .Bonneau. Rai, 

DuBliss, de Longuemare. 

22, 1908. . Norton. Mrs. Euphemia B Hannah, wife of 

Francis Cooke. 



77 

April 22, 1908. . Norton, Mrs. Edith Emery Hannah, ivife of 

Francis Cooke. 
April 13, 1904.. O'Brien. Mrs. Eliza N. \V Mazyck, LcSerurier, 

de St. Julien, Ravenel, Le Noble. 

April 13, |891..0'Hear, James, Wando, S. C ...Legare 

Mar. 21, 1900. .Oswald, George Douglas, James Island, S. C. .Robert 

Bran ye, LcGrand, Jaudon 

April 13, 1885. . Palmer,* Agnes M Gaillerd 

April 13, 1885.. Palmer,* Mrs. Alice A., Charleston, S. Z.&. . . .Gaillard 

Porcher, de Chcrigny, Maz$ck, Lc 

Sernrier. 

April 5, 1890.. Palmer, Dr. Joseph, Trial, S. C, d Gendron 

April 13, 1905.. Palmer, Mrs. Lucy B., Cambridge, Mass Mauze. 

April 13, 1891. .Parker, Edward L., d Pcronneau 

April 13, 1901. .Parker, Dr. F. Lejau, Charleston, S. C LeJau, 

I 1 ugucnhi. 

April 2, 1885.. Parry,* Mrs. Agnes, S., Charleston, S. C Legare 

April 13, 1902. . Parry, Alva R., Charleston, S. C Legare 

April 19, 1911.. Parry, Miss Inez B,, Charleston, S. C. Legare. 

April 2, 1885. Parry,* L. 'roomer, r : Legare 

April 21, 1900. .Parry, Miss Susan II., Charleston, S. C Legare 

April 19, 1911. .Paul Washburn, Pass Christian. Miss Prioleau. 

April 27, 1899. . Pcronneau, Miss Susan II., Mcnteagle, Tenn. d 

Pcronneau. 

Sept. 26,. 1.899.. Pinckney, Robt. Q., d Gailiard 

April 15, 1903.. Pollard, Mrs. R 

April 14, 1890.. Porcher, Miss Anna S., Charleston, S. C Porcher, 

Mazyck. Gendron. 

April 19, 1896. . Porcher, Miss Clelia S., Charleston, S. C Porcher, 

. ' Macyck, Gendron. 

April 13. 1885.. Porcher,* Prof. F. A., d ....Porcher, Mazyck, Gendron 

April 3, 1890. . Porcher, Dr. Francis Peyre, d ........ Porcher, Peyre 

April 23, 1897.. PORCHER, ISAAC de C, Ronneaus, S. C. .Porcher, 

de Chcrigny, Ravenel. Mazfck. 

Le Xo'blc, ' de St. Julien. ' Lc 

Seruricr: 

April 13, 1902. . Porcher, J. F., Charleston, S. C. Porcher, de Chcrigny. 

April 13. 1907.. PORCHER, JOHN H., Pinopolis, S. C. d. ... Porcher. 

de Chen guy, Ravenel, Mazyck, 

LeNoble, de St. Julien, LeSeru- 

rier. 
April 19, 1911. . Porcher, Mrs. Katherine Conies. Pinopolis. . Marion, 

DeVeaiix. 
April 20, 1906.. Porcher. Mrs. Mary V^C. Mt. Pleasant. S. C.Cordes. 
May 5, 1897. . Porcher, Philip E., Mount Pleasant, S. C Porcher, 



7* 



April 


20, 


1906 


April 


19, 


1911 


April 


13, 


1901 


April 


13, 


1901 


April 


21. 


1900 


April 


2 


1885 



April 13, 1885 



April 15, 

April 13, 

April 22, 

April 17, 

June 2, 



1912 
1904 
1908 

1902 
1897 



April 2, 1885 



April 


9, 


1890 


April 


? 


1885 


April 


13, 


1885 


April 


13, 


1905 


Nov. 


2 


1897 


Nov. 


25, 


1897 


May 


30, 


1890 


Nov. 


> 


1897 


April 


> 


18S5 



April 19, 1911 



April 22, 
April 15, 
April 21. 



1908 
1909 
1890. 



..Porcher, Philip G., d . . ■ Porcher, deCheriyny, DuBose, 

Cordes, Masyck, LeSernrier, 
.Porcher, .Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa Porcher. 

DuBose, Cordes, Masyck, Le 

Seruner. 
.Porcher, Miss Virginia Leigh, Charleston, S. C 

de Cherigny, Porcher, Peyrc, 

Macyt k, LeNoble, Le Serurier. 
.Porcher, L)r. Walter Peyre; Charleston, S. C 

Porcher, Masyck, LeNoble, de 

Cherigny, Le Serurier. 
.Porcher, Mrs. Walter Peyre, d ....Porcher, Gaillard. 
.PORCHER,* VVM. MAZYCK, d ..Porcher, Masyck, 

Le Seruner. 
.Porcher,* Wihnot D., Charleston, S. C DuPri 

de Cherigny, Gignilliat, Pelut, 

Porcher. 
.Potter, Aida Blackburn, Galveston, Texas .'. Flournay. 

. Poyas, James O., d Poyas. 

.Phillips, James Henry Witherspoon, Tampa, Fla., 

Richebourg. 

.Pringle, Mrs. Elizabeth W., Plantersville, S. C.Gibert. 
.Pringle, Mrs. Mary Ford, Charleston, S. C Godin, 

Masyck. 
.Prioleau,* Ann G., Charleston, S. C Prioleau, 

Gendron. 

.Prioleau, Charles E., d Prioleau, Gendron 

.Prioleau,* Charlotte G., Charleston, S. C Guerard 

.Prioleau,* Dr. Jacob lord, (/ Priohau, Gendron 

.Prioleau, John G Prioleau, Gendron, Gaillard. 

.Prioleau, Julian, Atlanta, Ga Prioleau, Gendron 

.Prioleau, Morris, Atlanta, Ga Prioleau, Gendron 

.Prioleau, Philip, Atlanta, Ga Prioleau. Gendron 

.Prioleau, Samuel, Atlanta, Ga Prioleau, Gendron 

.Prioleau,* l>r. W. 11, Charleston, S. C Prioleau.. 

Gendron. 
.Proctor, Mrs. Antoinette Morris, Monroe City, Mo... 
Martin, Rapine, Gucrrant , Trabue. 

.Ouinlin, Mrs. Leonard G., New York, N. Y Manse. 

.Rand, Belle Palmer, Cambridge, Mass Wause, 

.Randolph, Harrison, Charleston, S. C Bayard, 



April 21, 1 000'. .Randolph, Mrs. V. R, Charleston, S. C. 

Stu vvesant. 



Bavard, 



79 

April 15, 1907.. Ravenel, A. E. F., Roanoke, Va Raven el, Prioleau. 

Mazyck, LeSerurier Gendron. 

Mar. 30, 1890. .Rave i id, Alfred Ford, d Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, Le Senwier. 
Oct. 30, 1885.. Ravenel,. Miss C. 1'., Charleston, S. C... ....Ravenel, 

Prioleau. 

Mazyi k, Cordes, LeSerurier, 
de St. Jul icu. 
April 15, 1903. .Ravenel, Miss Clare \V„ Philadelphia, Pa Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Gendron, Mazyck, 

LeSerurier. 

April 2, 1885. .Ravenel,* Daniel, d Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, 

Le Serurier. 

April 2, 1885.. Ravenel,* Daniel, Jr., Charleston, S. C Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier 
April 13, 1898. .Ravenel, Dr. Edmond, Charleston, S. C Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1899. .Ravenel, Elias Prioleau, Charleston, S. C Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1885.. Ravenel*, Miss Elinor P., Charleston, S. C... Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, Cordes, LeSeru- 
rier, de St. Julien. 
Oct. 30, 1885.. Ravenel, Miss Elizabeth, McP., Charleston, S. C, d.... 

Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, 

Cordes, LeSerurier, de St. Julien. 
April 2, 1885. .Ravenel*, Miss Elizabeth Prioleau, Charleston, S. C... 

Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, Le 

Serurier. 
April 13, 1898. .Ravenel, Miss Emma, Charleston, S. C, r ... .Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1885. .Ravenel*. Frank C, Charleston, S. C, r ....Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Horry, Mazyck, Le 

Serurier. 
April 13, 1885, . Ravenel \ Mrs. Harriet Parker. Charleston, S C 

Mazyck, Ravenel LeSerurier. 

April 13, 1885. .Ravenel*, Mrs. Harriott Horry, r Horry, Motte. 

April 13, 1885. .Ravenel*, Harriott Rutledge, Charleston, S. C, r ..... 

Ravenel, Prioleau, Horry, Mazyck, 

LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1899.. Ravenel, Henry E.. Spartanburg, S. C Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
Oct. 30, 1885.. Ravenel, HenrySv., d ....Ravenel, Mazyck, LeNoble, 

de St. J ul ie ii. 
April 3, 1890. .Ravenel. II. S., r Ravenel Mazyck. LeNoble, 

de St. Julien. 



So 

April 17, 1890. .Ravenel, Heyward, Savannah, (ia., d Ravenel, 

Mazyck, I 'ore her, Le Noble, tie 
St. Julien. 

Oct. 30, 1885. .Ravenel, J. R. P., Charleston, S. C Ravenel I'nuleau, 

Mazy i k, LeSerurier. 

April 13, 1885. .Ravenel*, John, ;- Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, 

LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1885. . Ravenel*, Louis, Chicago, 111 Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 15, 1903. .Ravenel, Miss Marguerite A., Philadelphia, Pa 

Ravenel, Rrioleau, Gendron, 

Mazyck , LeSerurier. 
April 2, 1885. .Ravenel*, Mary Coffin, d ..Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, 

LeSerurier. 
M'ch 31, 1890.. Ravenel, Dr. Mazyck Porcher, Philadelphia. Pa 

Ravenel, Prioleau, Porcher, 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 23, 1892. .Ravenel, Rene, d .Ravenel, Mazyck, LeNoble, 

Del 'eau.v. de St. Julien. 
April 13, 1885. .Ravenel*, Robert Thurston, Baltimore, Md.. .Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck. LeSerurier. 
Oct. 20. 1885. .Ravenel, Rosa Pringle, Charleston, S. C Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
Oct. 30, 1885.. Ravenel, S. Prioleau, Philadelphia, Pa., d ....Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1885.. Ravenel*, S. Prioleau, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa 

Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, I.e 

Scrurier. 
May 30, 1890. . Ravenel", Stephen DeVeaux, Cordele, Ga Ravenel, 

Mazyck, le Noble, de I'eaux, 

de St. Julien. 
April 3, 1890.. RAVENEL, THOMAS PORCHER, d Ravenel, 

Mazyck, Porcher, LeNoble, 

de St. Julien. 
April 8, 18^0. .Ravenel, Thos. Porcher, Jr., Savannah, Ga.... Ravenel, 

Mazyck, Porcher, LeNoble, 

de St. Julien. -.- 
April 2. 1885.. Ravenel* Wm., d Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 1, 1890. .Ravenel, Win. Bee, Charleston. S. C Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1885. .Ravenel*. Dr. Wm. Chardon, Atlanta. Ga., d 

Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, 

LeSerurier. 
April 12, 1890.. Reeves. John B., Charleston, S. C Bounethe.iu. 



8i 



April 13; 1902. 

April 13, 1885. 
Jan. 29, 1892. 
April 17, 1897. 

April 15,. 191)3. 
April 14, 1811), 
Oct. 9, 1890. 
April 20, 1906, 

April 15, 1912. 

April 13, 1902 

April 13, 1910, 

April 2, 1888. 

Nov. 25, 1897. 

April 15, 1912, 

April 8, 1890, 

April 14, 1890 

April 14, 1890, 
April 15, 1909 

April 19, 1911 

April 15, 1907 
April 22, 1908 



April 13, 191)1 
April 15, 1907 



April 13, 1910. 

April 22, 1908, 

May *30, 1890 

April 13, 1910, 



April 13, 1904 



.Reeves, Mrs. John B., Charleston, S. C Simons, 

DuPrl 

. Reid* Mary Burden, Charleston. S. C, d Legare. 

.Richardson, John M., d Guignard, DeLesleine. 

.Richardson, Thus. B., Sumter, S. C Guignard, 

DeLesleine. 

.Robert, John 11.. Garnett, S. C, Robert. 

. Robert Pierre, Robertville, S. C Robert 

.Robert, Rev. Win. II., Centerfield, Mass Robert. 

.Roberts, Belle Sumter, Birmingham, Ala Poyas, 

Leg are. 
.Roberts, Jane DiiBbse, New York, N. Y. . . ". .Porcher. 
.Robertson Henry G., Franklin, X. C. .Marion, Baluct. 
.Robinson, Ellen Llewellyn, St. Louis, Mo., Jacqiiclin. 

. Rodgers* S. II., Beaufort, S C .....Legate. 

.Rogers, Miss Louisa. New York, N. Y Gignilliat. 

.Rose, Mrs. Andrew, Texarkana, Texas Gaston. 

.Robe, W. H„ Columbia. S. C Mazyck, Godin, 

Gucrard. 
.Rutledge, Gen'l Benj. linger, d linger, Cordes, 

J'erdrum, Russin or Ru-fin, Richet. 

.Rutledge, l>. II., Jr., r linger, Cordes. 

. Sease, Mrs. Mary Olivia Sheeut, Orangeburg, S. C 

■ Slice ut. 

.Selkirk - , Mrs. Louise Mann, Galveston, Texas 

Pickens. 

.Semple, Mrs. Isabel, J. F., St. Louis. Mo Macon. 

.Seyburn, Mrs. Kathleen \\\, Patterson, La.. . .Mas'yi k, 

LeSerurier, LeNoble, de St. 

J illicit, Ravencl. 
.Shackelford, Mrs. Anne R., Charleston, S. C. .Thomas. 
.Shields, Mrs. Mazyck \V Maseeh, 

LeSerurier, Ravencl. LeNoble, 

de St. J alien. 
.Shropshire, Mrs. Susan Jane Martin, Nealton, Ky... 

'Lrabne, Martin, Guerant, Rapine. 
.Simons, Mrs Annie E.. Berkeley Co., S. C .Gatllard. 

..Simons, Arthur St. J., Charleston, S. C Simons. 

.Simons, Drayton, S. C, May rant, 

(iiiignard. De l.csslin, Gaillard, 

Ravencl, Legare, ' Le Serurier, 

Simons. DuPre, Mazyck, DuGue, 

St. J alien, Le Serurier. 
.Simons, Edw A., Charleston. S. C Simons, DuPre, 

- y -'ac\ck, LeSerurier. 



82 



April 13, 1904. .Simons, Eugene N., Charleston, S. C... .Simons, DuPri, 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 

April 13, 1905. .Simons, Mrs. Hal (formerly Miss Mary Bacot Bryan) 

Bacot, deSaussure, Peronneau, 
Merrier, Menessier, Moreau, Da- 
leu. 

April 22, 1908. .Simons, Joseph A., Wilmington, Del Simons, 

DuPre. 

April 15, 191)7. .Simons, Mrs. Josephine Alston Horry, Georgetown, 

S. C Horry. 

April 13, 1885 .; Simons*, Dr. Manning-. Charleston, S. C, r ....Simons. 

April 13, 1910. . Simons, Miss Mary ['on, Charleston, S. C Simons, 

Du Pre, L.c Serur'wr, Legare, 
Mazyck, DiiBose, DuGue. 

July 18, 1898.. Simons, P. Noble, New York, N. Y Mazyck, 

Simons. 

April 13, 1910. .Simons, Mrs. S. Lewis, Summerville, S. C, May rant, 

Guignard, De . Leseleine , Gaillard, 
Ravenel, Legare, Le Serurier. 

April 5. 1890. . Simons, Dr. T. Grange, Charleston, S. C. Simons 

July 12, 1897.. Sinkler, Mrs. Annie \V., Eutawville, S. C Porcher. 

April 19, 1911 . . Sinkler, Mrs. Ellen Simons Hall. Charleston, S. C 

LeSerurier, Leger, Simons, D u pre, 
Povas, Gendron, 1 relevant, Man- 
lard, Mazyck. 

April 13, 1902.. Sinkler, H'uger, Charleston, S. C, r linger, 

Broun, Cordes, Perdriau, Rassin 
or Kit fin. Richet. 

April 13, 1901 .. Sinkler, Thomas S., Charleston, S. C linger, 

Broun, Conies, Perdriau, Rassin 
or Rufin, Richet. 

April 15, 1909.. Sloan. Frank Porcher, Atlanta. Ga Porcher 

April 13, 1885. .Smith*, D. E. Huger, Charleston, S. C linger, 

Cordes, Perdriau. Rassin or Rufin, 
Richet. 

April 15, 1909. .Smith, H. A. M., Charleston. S. C. (Hon. Mem.)... 

April 15, 1907.. Smith, P. R., Charleston, S. C Robert. 

April 17, 1896.. Smith, Robt. T, Charleston, S. C, r linger, 

Cordes, Perdriau, Rassin or Rufin, 
Richet. 

April 23, 1891.. Smith, S. Porcher. Mount Pleasant, S. C Porcher. 

April 15, 1903.. Smith, Mrs. Z. F., Louisville, Ky. d DuPuy, 

Trabue, Plournoy. 

April 22, 1908. .Smythe. A. T., Jr., Charleston, S. C Turquand, 

C our tonne. 

April 13, 1901. .Smythe, Cheves McCord, Charleston, S. C. .Turquand. 



«3 

June 14. 1895. .Smytbe, Mrs. Louisa McC, Charleston, S. C 

Tmrguamd. 

Sept. 15, 1888. .Snowden, Yates, Columbia, S. C / 

li'ch 8, 1885..Spratly, Mrs. If. G.. Mobile, Ala . . lard. 

April 19 1911.. Squire. Mrs CorimM L, Neu York W. 

April 13, 1910. .Stanhope, Mr : . Annette Martin. Lexington, Ky 

Tralue, Rapine, Guerc. 
April 15, 1912. .Stephens, Mi=s Mamie H \ ibert. 

M'ch 31, 1891.. Steven, Rev. P. 1'.. d 

April 13, 1902. .Stiles, Rev. Charles A.. Eastover. S. C, d ...A.. 
April 14, 1890. .Stillman, Miss Anna R. Charleston. 5. C, 

Author on Huguenot Subject: 
April 13, 1835. .Stoney*, Mrs. Harriet Porcher. d ...Gaiilord F 

July 15, I 587. .Stoney, Samuel, D., d Gaillard 

April 13, 1885. IStoney*, Samuel G.. Charleston, S. C Gai i 

P archer. 
April 13, 1910. .Stooey, S. G., Jr., Charleston, S. C, Gaillard, Pc . . 

April 13, 19u2. . Stoney, Mrs. S G., Charleston S 

Ang . - Stone] as P., Charlesl - lard / her. 

Oct. : I 9 : Stoney, Wm. E.. d Gaillard. 

April 15, 1907.. St ranch, Miss Maud Mitchell, Kew York, X. Y 

A/a< 
April 13, 1904. .Taliaferro, Mrs. S.. San. Antonio, Texas Pojai 

deL. leh 
April 11. 19o8..Tatc. Mrs. Mary L.. Greensboro M. C Caul 

Huger. 

Aug. 22. 1898.. Taylor, Miss A. H.. Columbia, S. C Manigsult. 

April 7, 1900.. Terry, Mrs. E G.. Heflin, Ala.. G.bert. 

April 14, 1890. . Thomas, John P., Jr.. Columbia. S C Con:. . 

Guiijnard. DeLesleine, Feyre. 
April 13, 1905. . Thomas, Mrs. Lottie R., Charleston. S. C 

Bomnttheau. 

April 13, 1910. .Thomas, Robert G., C eston, S. C... J - I 

April 13, 1885. .Thomas*, S.. Jr.. Charleston, S. C Tk& u 

A ril _ 1885.. Thomas*, Dr. T. (gaillard. New York, N. Y.. 4 

. Jrd. 
April 15, 1907.. Thompson, Miss Mary Elliott, Ellicott City. Md 

deiimrbtmf. 
April 19. 1911 . .Thompson, Thomas Clarkson, Chattanooga, Tenn..... 

Hi 
April 15 1907. .Tilton. Mrs. Henrietta, B. M.. Seattle. Was! .'. :nnah 

Cook, {Walloon). 

Oct. 30, 1885. .Toomer, Miss M. E. r S* as i 

April 13, 18^..Trapier. Rev. R. S.. d 7>j 

M'ch 19, 1890. .Trapier, T. D. t r Tn n 

April 15, 1907. .Trenholm. Miss Julia E.. Giarlestc i 5 C Legare. 



April 15, 1909. 

Oct. 9, 1890. 
April 13, 1904. 



April 19. 1911. 

April 13, 1905. 

April 15, 1907. 

April 13, 1905. 

April 13, 1 ( X)5. 

April 21, 1900. 

April 13. 1885, 

April 13, 1885. 

April 13, 1910. 

April -2, 1885. 

April 20, 1906. 

April 15, 1905. 

April 13, 1910. 

April 13, 1910. 

April 13, 1905, 

April 13. 1905 

April 13, 1885 

April 13. 1885 

Oct. 30, 1885. 

\pnl 13, twoi 



April 13, 1905. 

April 15. 1907. 

April 15, 1909. 

April 22, 1908. 

April 15. 1912. 



April 22, 1908. 



84 

Trescot, ^Catherine Bocquet, Clcmson College, S. C... 

Mac$ck, Lc Scruricr. 

Trezevarit, J. T., Dallas, Texas Trczevant. 

Turner, Rev. Charles 11. B Tourneur, 

Poinsette., Faucheraud, Durou- 

zcan, .\ < o hiy. 
Turner. Mrs. NJettie Viola Chastain, New Smyrna, I' la. 

Chastain. 
Vaill, Mrs. Charlotte E. S., Portland, Me., d ..Moleyn. 

Vaill, E. G. Portland, Me Moleyn, Byssell 

Vaill, Fred S., Portland, Me Moleyn. 

Vaill, Miss Julia C, Portland, Me Moleyn. 

Vander Horst, Mrs. A. A, Charleston. S. C Gibert. 

Vedder* Rev. Chas S.. Charleston, S. O. pastor 
French Protestant Huguenot Congregation. 

Verner* J. S. Columbia, S. C I 'enter. 

Viley, Breckenridge, Versailles, Ky.. .Mm tin, Guerant, 

Ravcwcl. 
Walker*. Mrs. E. C, Atlanta, Ga Rave nel; Prioleau. 

Mazyck, LcScnu ier. 
.Wallace, Mrs. Helen Yates, Charleston. S. C. .Legate. 

. Ware, Mrs. Mary S , r Marye. 

Waties, Miss Katherine Calhoun, Columbus, Ga 

Mazyck. 

Waties, Thomas, Houston, Tex Mazyck. 

. Watkins, I le\ ward I . Trezcvant. 

.Weeks, Mrs. Washington Hunter, Washington, 

1) C. . • Macon. 

.West'efvelt* Mrs. Emily P., Greenville, S. C 

Gaillard. 

. West.ervelt*. J. Irving, Greenville, S. C Gaillard. 

Whaley, V. Gibbirs, * harleMOn, S. C. r :. . .Peronncau. 
\\ iekham, Mrs. Julia Pmcher Portlier, Peyre, 

Mazyck, LeXdble LcSemrier, de 

L ho lyiiy. 

.Wilbur, T. S Charleston. S. C Cothoneau. 

.Wilbur. Waller I',,. Charleston. S. C Cothoneau. 

.Wilcox, John, Marion. S. C Tresevant 

Wilkinson. Mrs. L. B. \\ ., Washington, 1). C.DuPuy. 

LcVillain. 
Williams. Mrs. Mary Ophelia Hal!, Baton Rouge, La., 

l.c Serurier, Poyas, Trezevant, 

Mazyck. Contrail, La Ccr. 
.Williams, Mrs. Serena Chesnut, Baltimore. Md.. Gibert 

Pt ttiCru. 



*5 

Nov. 1, 1899.. Williams, Dr. T. Whitridge, Baltimore, Md Maury, 

Fontaine. 

April 22, 1908. .Willis, Miss A. II Shecut, Gabeau. 

April 2, 1885. .Willis*, Edward, Charleston, S. C, d. .Shecut, Gabeau. 
April 13, 1899. .Wilhs, Miss Kola. Charleston, S. C... Shecut, Gabeau. 

April 15, 1903.. Willis, T. 11., Charleston, S. C Shecut, Gabeau. 

April 13, 1905. . Wilson, Dr. G. Fraser Vergereau, Bpudmoi 

April 21, 1900. .Wilson, Mrs. Harriett Chisolm, Charleston, S. C 

Gendron, Pore her. 
April 13. 1885. .Wilson 1 , James Mazyck, d Masyck, Ravenel, 

LeNoble, de St. Julien, LeSerurier. 
Men 31, 1890.. Wilson, Rev. Robert, D. 1)., Charleston, S. C 

Mazyck, Ravenel, LeNoble, de 

St. Julien, LeSerurier. 
April 19, 1897. .Wilson. Robert, Jr., M. D., Charleston, S. C. .Masyck, 

Ravenel, LeNoble, de St. Julien, 

LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1904. .Wilson, Miss S. Annie, ;• Masyck, LeNoble, 

Ravenel, LeSerurier, de St. J alien. 
April 10, 1899.. Wilson. Miss Sue Guignard, Charleston, S. C, d . . . . 

Mazyck, Ravenel, de St. Julien, 

Guignard , DeLesleine , he Seru- 

rier, Lc Noble. 
April 19, 1897. .Wilson. Miss Susan Ravenel, Charleston, S. C 

Masyck, Ravenel, LeNoble, de St. 

Julien, LeSerurier. 
April 22, 1908. .Witherspoon, Mrs. M. V., Versailles. Ky TraBue, 

Guerraut, Martin. 
April 13, 1902..Witte, Mrs. Ida Reeves, Charleston, S. C. . Aiouneiheau 

Legare. 
May 14. 1898. .Witte, Mrs. R.»sa Glen, Charleston, S. C 

Bonnetheau, Legate. 

April 13, 1905. .Woods, Hon. Charles A.. Marion, S. C DuBose. 

April 15, 1909. .Woods, Malcolm C Manon. S. C DuBose 

April 19, 1911 ..Woods, Robert 1\, Darlington, S. C Dullose 

April 13, 1902.. Woods, W. 1)., Darlington, S. C DuBose. 

April 13, VK)1. . Worcester, Mrs. Davie L., Cincinnati, Ohio, d 

LaVillian DuPrl 

April 19, 1911.. Wright, Mrs. Anne Minis, Jackson. Miss Perrine. 

April 13, 1902. .Wright, Mrs. Hannah McC, Savannah, Ga 

Turquand. 

April 5, 1890.. Young, Henry K., Charleston, S. C G our din 

April 15, 1907. .Zachry. Mrs. Elise Thompson. New York, N. Y.... 

Horry. LaRoche, Ogier 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAW'S OF THE 

HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH 

CAROLINA. 



Article I. 

Name. 

The name of this organization shall be "The Huguenot 
Society of South Carolina." 

Object. 

Article II. 

The object of the Society shall be : 

Firstly, To perpetuate the memory and to foster and 
promote the principles and virtues of the Huguenots. 

Secondly, To publicly commemorate at stated times the 
principal events in the history of the Huguenots.' 

Thirdly, To discover, collect and preserve all still exist- 
ing documents monuments, etc., relating to the genealogy 
or history of the Huguenots of America in general, and of 
those of South Carolina in particular. 

Fourthly, To gather by degrees a library for the use of 
the Society, composed of all obtainable books, monographs, 
pamphlets, manuscripts, etc., relating to the Huguenots. 

Fifthly, To cause statedly to be prepared and read be- 
fore the Society, papers, essays, etc., on Huguenot history 
or genealogy and collateral subjects. 

Article III. 

■ Membership. 

Section i. The membership of this Society shall be as 
follows : 



*7 

Firstly, All descendants in the direct male or female lines 
of the Huguenot families which emigrated to America prior 
to the promulgation of the Edict of Toleration, November 
28, 1787. 

Secondly, Representatives of other French families, 
whose profession of the Protestant Faith is anterior to the 
promulgation of the Edict of Toleration, November 28, 

1787. 

Thirdly, Pastors of French Huguenot congregations in 
South Carolina. ( 

Fourthly, Writers who have made the history, genealogy, 
principles, etc., of the Huguenots a special subject of study 
and research^ to whatever nationality they may belong. 

Sec. 2. The members of the Society may consist of 
three classes: Resident, Corresponding and Honorary; but 
the rights and privileges of each class shall be the same. 

Sec. 3. The annual fees of Resident and Corresponding 
members shall be one dollar, and the payment of twenty 
dollars shall constitute one a life member. All dues shall 
be paid in advance. 

Sec. 4. The funds of this Society shall be applied only 
to the furtherance and realization of the objects contem- 
plated in this constitution. 

Sec. 5. All life-membership fees shall be invested by 
the Executive Committee (hereinafter provided for) in the 
name of the Society, and only the interest arising there- 
form shall be used for the purposes of the Society. 

Sec. (>. Application for membership, with a statement 
of the name, address, profession, and descent of the appli- 
cant, shall be made in writing to the Executive Committee, 
who shall report thereon at the next meeting of the Society. 
If their report be favorable, the candidate shall be consid- 
ered as duly elected; but if demanded, the election shall 
be by ballot, and a two-thirds vote of the members present 
shall be necessary to elect. Every application for mem- 
bership shall be accompanied by one year's dues. 



88 



Article IF. 

Section i. The officers of the Society shall consist of a 
President, a Vice-President for each original Huguenot 
centre or settlement in South Carolina, a Secretary and 
Treasurer, an Historian, and an Executive Committee 
composed of the President, Vice-President, the Secretary 
and Treasurer, the Historian, and 'five members elected by 
the Society. 

Sec. 2. Besides the ordinary rights and duties of a pre- 
siding officer, the President shall appoint the places of meet- 
ing; in conjunction with the Secretary and Treasurer, he 
shall have the power, and upon the written request of live 
members it shall be his duty, to call special meetings of 
the Society, and he shall sign all drafts drawn on the 
Treasurer. 

Sec. 3. It shall he the duty of the Vice-Presidents to in- 
terest in the objects of this Society the Huguenots of the 
localities which they represent; in the absence of the Presi- 
dent of this Society, a Vice-President shall preside and ex- 
ercise all the rights and privileges of the President; and if 
more than one Vice-President be present, the senior Vice- 
President in attendance shall be the presiding officer. 

Sec. 4. It shall be the duty of the Secretary and Treas- 
urer to keep an accurate record of all the proceedings of the 
Society and of the Executive Committee; to conduct the 
correspondence of the Society; to notify members of the 
meetings of the Society; to inform officers and new mem- 
bers of their election. 

It shall also be his duty to collect all dues, fees and other 
moneys belonging to the Society, and to deposit the same 
in some bank in the City of Charleston in the name of the 
Society. Out of these sums he shall pay such sums only 
as may be ordered by the Society through its President, or 
the Executive Committee. He shall keep an accurate ac- 
count of its receipts and disbursements, and render an 
account of the same at each annual meeting of the Society, 
which shall name a committee to audit them. For his 



8 9 

services he shall he allowed ten per centum of all amounts 
collected hy him, 

Sec. 5. It shall he the duty of the Elistoriail to have in 

his keeping all hooks, pamphlets, manuscripts, etc., per- 
taining or belonging to the Society, and to receive and col- 
lect data relating to the History of the Huguenots before 
and since their settlement in America. 

Sec. 6. It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee 
to examine and ,pass upon the credentials of candidates; to 
invest and manage the funds of the Society; to engage 
suitable persons to deliver the addresses and prepare the 
papers contemplated in this contribution, and to make all 
other arrangements necessary for the meetings of the So- 
ciety, and to transact all business of the Society not other- 
wise provided for in the constitution. 

Sec. 7. llie officers of the Society shall be annually 
elected at the anniversary meeting; but if any vacancy 
occur during the year the Executive Committee shall have 
power to appoint a member of the Society to fill such 
vacancy for the unexpired term. 

Article I \ 
Meetings. 

This Society shall hold two regular meetings each year 
and, in accordance with the purpose of the Society, the 
said meetings shall take place on the following historical 
dates : 

Section 1. The Anniversary Meeting shall be held on 
April 13th, the day of the Promulgation of the Edict of 
Nantes, granting Freedom of Worship to the Huguenots of 
France. 

Sec. 2. The Autumn meeting of the Society shall be 
held on the 22d of October, the date of the Revocation oi 
the Edict of Nantes. 

Sec. 3. The Executive. Committee shall have power to 



9 o 

arrange lor a dinner, or other collation, annually as they 
may deem most appropriate. 

Sec. 4. In case any of these dates should fall upon a day 
inconvenient for the proper celebration thereof, the Execu- 
tive Committee shall appoint for the meeting the next most 
convenient day. 

BY-LAWS. 

Section i. Notices of meetings shall he given at least 
one week in advance. 

Sec. 2. It shall always require fifteen members to con- 
stitute a quorum for the transaction of business. 

Skc. .3. At all meetings of the Society the order of busi- 
ness shall be as follows : 
Prayer. 

1. The reading and adopting of the minutes of the pre- 

vious meeting. 

2. Reports of officers. 

3. Reports of the Executive (Committee. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Reports of special committees. 

6. Miscellaneous business. 

7. Election of officers. 

8. The reading of papers or delivery oi addresses before 

the Society. 

9. Adjournment. 

Sec. 4. All resolutions must be presented in writing to 
the Chair. 

Sec. 5, If any member neglect or refuse to pay his an- 
nual fees for two consecutive years, the Treasurer shall 
report his name to the Executive Committee, who may 
strike his name from the roll of membership. 

Sec. 6. Such members of the Society as do not them- 
selves bear Huguenot names shall add to their own names 
(on signing the constitution ) the Huguenot names through 
which they claim descent. 

Sec. 7. The original Huguenot settlements in this State, 



9i 

each one of which is entitled to a Vice-President, are as 
follows: Charleston, Puryshurg and New Bordeau. 

Sec. 8. The Constitution and By-Laws oi this Society 
may be amended or repealed at any meeting of the Society 
by a two-thirds vote; but the changes proposed must have 
been submitted at a previous meeting. They may also be 
amended or repealed by a vote of a majority of all the 
members of the Executive Committee at any meeting dur- 
ing the recess of the Society: Provided, the amendment 
so adopted shall be confirmed at the next meeting of the 
Society. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE SOCIETY. 

Transactions No. I. Published in 1889. 

An account of the organization of the Society in 
1885. 

List of names of Charter members. 

List of officers, 1885 to 1889. 

Memorial to Genl. Wilmot G. deSaussure, late presi- 
dent of the Society. 

Short sketches of the lives of late members, etc., etc. 

President Daniel Ravenel's Annual Address. 

Address by.Wni. St. Julien Jervey, Esq., delivered 
at the Annual Meeting, April 13th, 1889. 

[Out of Print. 
Transactions No. 2. An historical sermon delivered at the 
French Protestant Church, on Sunday, April 13, 1890, 
by the Rev. Charles S. Vedder, D. 1)., Pastor; with 
picture of Church and list of Pastors from 1686 to 
1890. 

Proceedings, of the Anniversary Meeting, April 14, 
1890. 

List of officers and new members. 

"Ivry," a Poem, by Rev. C. S. Vedder, D. D. 

An address before the Society, by Lion. Thomas 
F. Bayard, etc., etc. 
Transactions No. 3. Published in 1894. Report of Presi- 
dent Wm. St. Julien Jervey, at Annual Meeting, April 



1 3th, 1891, and list of officers 01" the Society. Presi- 
dent's Address at Annual Meetings of 1893 and 1 894. 
List of officers and list of members elected since 1890. 
Short sketches of the lives of deceased members. 

An address before the' Society, on the Early Hugue- 
nots and their emigration to America, by Gabriel E 
Manigault, M. D. [Out of Print. 

Transactions No. 4. Published 1897. Papers on some 
Early Huguenot families in South Carolina: a The 
Legare Family, b The linger Family, with pedigree. 
c The Marion Family, d The Manigault Family from 
i'665 to j 886, with portraits. 

A paper on the Huguenot Influence in Colonial 
South Carolina, by Rev. Robt. Wilson, I). I). 

Sketches of the lives of late deceased members < f 
the Society, etc., etc. 
Transactions No. 5. Published 1898. 1. The First Hu- 
guenot Immigrants from 1670 to 1680, [O80 to 1690, 
1690 to 1700. 

Hostility of the English Settlers to the French, etc 

Naturalization of Huguenot Residents. 

List of names ot' French and Swiss Refugees in 
Carolina, etc. Character of the Huguenots. 

The Huguenot Churches in South Carolina: St. 
John's Parish, Berkeley; St. Dennis Parish, or Orange 
Quarter; Settlement and Church on Santee River. 

The Huguen »ts of Abbeville, S. C, etc., etc. 

Founding of the South Carolina Society of Charles- 
ton. 

Notices of Conspicuous Members of the Gaillard 
Family. 
Transactions No. 6. Published 1899. An Historical 
Sketch of the Prioleau Family in Europe and Amer- 
ica, with illustrations, by Rev. Robt. Wilson, D. D. 
and Gabriel Manigault, M. 1). 

The Ravenel Family m France ami America, by 
Daniel Ravenel, Sr., etc., etc. 



93 



h 



I 



f 



I 



Transactions No. 7. Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual 
Meeting of the Society, April 2i>[, 1900. 

List of officers. 

An Historical Sketch of the Huguenot Congrega- 
tions of South Carolina: French Santee, Orange 
Quarter, St. John's, Berkeley; the Church of Charles- 
ton, by the late Daniel Ravenel, of Charleston, with 
notes by the late Gen. Wilmot G. DeSaussure, ot* 
Charleston.' 
Transactions No. 8. Proceedings of the Sixteenth Anni- 
versary- Meeting of the Society, April 13th, 1901. 

Annual address of President Robert Wilson, I). D. 

Resume of Transactions, 1897 to [901. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 

List of members with names of original Huguenot 
Families from whom descended. 

Letter from the Honorable Alfred Huger, upon the 
death of Mr. Petigru. 

A Narrative of the File and Services of Francis 
G. DeLieseline during the War oi the American Rev- 
olution, by Dr. Win. C. Ravenel. 
Transactions No. 9. Minutes of the Seventeenth Annual 
Meeting of the Society, April 17th, 1002. 

The President's Address. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 

Enlarged and revised list of members, with name 
or names oi persons from whom they derive their 
descent. 

An address on the Early Huguenots, delivered be- 
fore the Society by Col. Richard L. Maury, of Rich- 
mond, Va. 
Transactions No. 10. Minutes of the Eighteenth Annual 
Meeting of the Society, held April 15th, 1903. List 
of officers. President's Address. Historian's Report. 
Some wills of South Carolina Huguenots; copies in 
original French, with translations in English. A 
paper, entitled The Huguenots in Dublin, by Rev. 
Robt. Wilson, D. D. 



94 

Transactions No. n. Minutes of the Nineteenth Annual 
Meetings of the Society, held April 13th, [904. 

Annual Address of President Robt. Wilson. 

A brief memorial to Francis Marion. 

"The Huguenots of South Carolina," an Address 
before the Society, by Mr. Thomas VV. Bacot. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 

Some Wills oi South Carolina Huguenots; copies 
in original French, with translations in English; with 
comments by Rev. Robert Wilson, D. D. Continued 
from No. 10. 

A list of Contents of the preceding numbers of the 
Transactions of the Society. 
Transactions No. 12. Minutes of the 20th Annual Meet- 
ing of the Society, held April 13th, 1905. 

List of officers. 

Historian's Report. 

President's Report. 

Huguenot Immigration in South Carolina. 

A Short Story of Three Brothers. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 

Publications of the Society. 
Transactions No. 13. Minutes of the 21st Annual Meeting 
of the Society, held April 20th, 1906. 

List of officers. 

Historian's Report. 

Annual Address of President. 

The French Protestant Church, Paper read by Miss 
Ravenel. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

Upper Beat of St. John's, Berkeley, by late Prof. 
F. A. Porcher. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 

Antoine Gabeau, by Miss Willis. 

Additional Data on Cordes Family. Maj. J. J. 
Lucas and D. E. Huger Smith, Esq. 

Old Document on Bruneau Family. Mr. A. S 
Salley, Jr. 



95 

Notes from Crottet Mss. 

Publications of the Society. 
Transactions No. 14. List of Officers. 

Minutes of 221I Annual Meeting. 

Report of Historian. 

President's Address. 

Huguenots on Santee River, by late Henry A. De- 
Saussure. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots, Editorial Notes. 

Dr. J. L. E. W. Shecut, Miss Eola Willis. 

Ribault's Fort. Miss Isabelle PeSaussure. 

Miscellaneous. 

List of Members. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 

List of Publications of the Society. 
Transactions No. 15. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of 23d Annual Meeting. 

Treasurer's Statement. 

Report of Llistoriau. 

President's Address. 

.Poem. The Bretons. 

Wills of S. C. Huguenots. Editorial Notes. 

Notice of Rene Ravenel, Immigrant. 

The Last of the Huguenots. Stephen Thomas. 

The Isle of Oleron. M. M. do Richemond and 
Thomas. 

List of Members, revised. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 

List of Publications of the Society. 
Transactions No. 16. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of 24th Annual Meeting. 

Reports. 

President's Address. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

The State of French Protestants after 1685. 

Correspondence and Plat Site of Old Goose Creek 
French Church. 



I 



9 6 

The French Huguenot Church of the Parish of St. 
James, Goose Creek. 

List of members revised. 
Constitution and By-Laws. 
List of Publications of Society. 
Transactions No. 17. 
1 ,ist of officers. 

Minutes of 25th Annual Meeting. 
Reports of officers. 
President's Address. 
Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 
, The Huguenots in America (By Hon. \. T. Clear- 
water. ) 

Note on Sompayrac. 

Letter concerning Rev. Mr. Ponderous. 
Huguenot Lineage of Erroll If. Colcock. 
Look Notices: '*Les Freres Gibert ." The Journal 
of American History,Vol, NIX, No. 111. 3d Quarter. 
List of Members. 
Constitution and By-Laws. 
Publications of the Society. 
Transactions No. 18. 
List of officers. 

Minutes of 26th Annual Meeting. 
Reports of officers. 
President's Address. 

Account of Porcher Family, By Mrs. Wickham. 

Hook Notices La Reforme dans L/Isle IVOleron, 

Par Paul Thomas, Capaeitaire en Droit. Ouvrage 

Orne de onze illustrations. Lczay. Imprimerie- 

Libraire H. Canon. 1911. pp. 121. Paper. 

All members in good standing receive the publications 

ii' 111 the date of their membership without charge. 

Price: Copies of back numbers of the Transactions, ex- 
cept Numbers One and Three, Foi r and Eight, which 
are out of print, will be mailed to members of the 
Society on receipt of 40 cents. To other than mem- 
bers the price is 60 cents each, post paid. 

Address communications to Dr. J. Bachman Chisolm, 
Secretary, 26 Broad Street, Charleston, S. C. 



TRANSACTIONS 

OF THE 

Huguenot Society 

OF 

South Carolina 
No. 20 

PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY 




(INCORPORATED JUNE 21, 1909) 



CHARLESTON, S. C. 
1914 



PRIZE ESSAY 

$25.00 Prize for Best Essay on the Influence of the Huguenots 
in the United States of America 

The Executive Committee have decided to offer a prize of 
$25.00 for the best essay on The Influence of the Hugue- 
nots in the United States of America. This contest is 
open to all persons who shall be members of the Society on April 
13, 1915, and whose dues are paid up to that date. 

The contest closes on September 1, 1915, on which date the 
essay must be in the hands of the Secretary. The copy must be 
typewritten and the name and address attached to a separate 
sheet of paper. The Secretary will number the essays and take 
off the name before putting them in the hands of the judges, 
in this way the Secretary alone will know the author of the essay. 
The essay must be of not less than 4000 words and not more 
than 7000 words. 

The following members of the Society, and eminent authori- 
ties on all Huguenot subjects,. have consented to act as judges: 
Hon. H. A. duPont, United States Senator from Delaware, 
Winterthur, Del.; Hon. A. T. Clearwater, ex-Judge Supreme 
Court of New York, Kingston, N. Y.; and the Rev. Robert 
Wilson, D.D., ex-President of the Huguenot Society of South 
Carolina, Charleston, S. C. 

The name of the winner will be announced in "Transactions" 
No. 21, and the essay in full will be printed in that number. 



NOTES 

The Huguenot Society is not local in its scope, its member- 
ship including persons of approved Huguenot descent from all 
parts of the world. 

You are urged to use the enclosed application and secure for 
the Society a new member. 



Certificates of Membership will be mailed to members immedi- 
ately after their election. 



The Society Pins or Badges may be obtained by members 
from the Secretary, postage free, at the rate of $2.00 for those 
enameled on silver, or $4.00 for those enameled on gold. The 
pin represents the Seal of the Society and is about the size of a 
quarter of a dollar. 



Owing to the large increase in membership in the past two or 
three years and the demand from libraries in various parts of the 
world several numbers of the "Transactions" of the Society have 
become exhausted and we are anxious to obtain copies of the* 
following numbers 1, 3, 4, 7, 8, 13, 17, 18, 19. 

The Society would appreciate gifts of any of these numbers. 



Members of the Society are earnestly requested to notify the 
Secretary of change in residence and post office address, and 
change of name by marriage — also, of any deaths among the 
membership which may come to their knowledge. 



OFFICERS 1913-1914 

President 
, REV. ROBERT WILSON, D.D. 

Vice-Presidents 

For Charleston— STEPHEN THOMAS 

For Purysburg— T. W. BACOT 

For New Bordeaux— CHAS. P. ALLSTON 

Secretary and Treasurer 
DR. J. BACHMAN CHISOLM 

Historian 
WM. G. MAZYCK 

Executive Committee 

ARTHUR MAZYCK 
DR. T. GRANGE SIMONS 
THEO. G. BARKER 
WILLIAM C. MILLER 
JOHN B. REEVES 

The President, Vice-Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer, and Historian are 
ex officio members of the Executive Committee — and all ex-Presidents are advis- 
ory members. 



MINUTES 

Charleston, S. C, April 16, 1913. 

The Twenty-eighth Anniversary Meeting of the Huguenot 
Society of South Carolina was held this day at the South 
Carolina Hall at 5.30 p. m. A quorum being present, the meeting 
was called to or,der by the Rev. Robert Wilson, D. D. 

The meeting was opened with prayer by Rev. Robert Wilson. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

The Treasurer read his report, which was received as informa- 
tion and ordered spread on the minutes. 

The President instead of making a report of the Executive 
Committee addressed the Society in reference to revising the 
Constitution and By-Laws. 

After some discussion the following resolutions were 
adopted : — 

Resolved: That the care of the members for the future of the 
Society makes it advisable to revise its Constitution and rules 
and to consider plans for its re-organization on a more efficient 
basis. 

Further Resolved: That a committee of four members of the 
Society be selected by nomination from the floor (and by elec- 
tion should the number nominated exceed four) to consider, with 
the President, feasible and advisable plans for such re-organiza- 
tion and report the same at a meeting of the Society, to be called 
for the purpose. 

The Society proceeded at once to the election of the com- 
mittee, which resulted as follows: 

Messrs. T. W. Bacot, Daniel Ravenel, F. K. Myers and George 
S. Holmes. 

The following applications for membership were reported upon 
and the applicants duly elected members of the Society: 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 7 

1 . Percival R. Porcher Bonneau, S. C. 

2 . C. S. Dwight, Jr Charleston, S. C. 

3 . Rovvena E. Dwight Pinopolis, S. C. 

4. Charles Stevens Dwight Columbia, S. C. 

5 . M. B. Trezevant New Orleans, La. 

6. Mrs. J. C. G. Howe Charleston, S. C. 

7 . Miss Dora Howe Charleston, S. C. 

8 . Mrs. S. P. Gibson Red Springs, N. C. 

9. Mrs. J. M. Gibson Red Springs, N. C. 

10. Thos. Fenei Gibson New York, N. Y. 

11 . Mrs. C. J. P. Pine Cincinnati, Ohio 

12 . A. P. Jones Columbia, S. C. 

13. Mrs. M. W. Vincent Texarkana, Texas 

14. Mrs. C. H. Curry Topeka, Kansas 

15. Mrs. E. C. C. Gray St. Louis, Mo. 

16. Mrs. Katharine M. Porter Jackson, Miss. 

17 . Mrs. S. L. Berliner Texarkana, Ark. 

18. Miss M. Legare O'Hear Charleston, S. C. 

19. Mrs. Mary Postell O'Hear Charleston, S. C. 

20. Dr. G. E. Beckman Jacksonville, Fla. 

21 . M. \V. Watts Wichita Falls, Texas 

22. Rev. F. A. dc-Rosset Charleston, S. C. 

23. Miss Ella Lou C. Wisdom Texarkana, Texas 

24. Ralph Dunbar. . Ellenton, S. C. 

25. Edwin P. Guerard, Jr , Charleston, S. C. 

26. Madame Celine Bonnet Dorion Bacot 
(Widow of Louis Bacot) Sedan, France 

27 . Theo. Gaillard Snowden Charleston, S. C, 

28. W. Cuttino Wilbur .Charleston, S. C. 

29. Miss C. R. Holmes Charleston, S. C. 

30. B. F. Taylor (Life Member) Columbia, S. C. 

The Historian was called on for his report which was read and 
ordered spread on the minutes. 

The election was then entered into for new officers, and the 
old officers were re-elected to serve for the ensuing year: 

President: Rev. Robert Wilson, D.D. 

Vice-President for Charleston: Stephen Thomas. 

Vice-President for Purysburg: T. W. Bacot. 

Vice-President for New Bordeaux: Charles P. Allston. 

Secretary and Treasurer: Dr. J. Bachman Chisolm. 

Historian: Wm. G. Mazyck. 

Executive Committee: Arthur Mazyck, Dr. T. Grange Simons, 
Theodore G. Barker, Wm. C. Miller, and John B. Reeves. 



8 TRANSACTIONS 

There being no further business before the meeting it wai 
ordered adjourned. After adjourning a delightful collation wai 
served, which was greatly enjoyed. 

J. Bachman Chisolm, Secretary. 

STATEMENT 

OF 

J. Bachman Chisolm, Treasurer, 

For year 1912 to 1913— April 13, 1912, to April 13, 1913 
Receipts 
1912 
April 13 

To balance from last year $434 . 9 

To members' dues from April 13, 1912, to April 13, 1913 337 . 2i 

To sale of pins for year 47 . (X 

To sale of Transactions for year 15 .4 

To interest on permanent fund for year. 14. h 

"$84876 
Disbursements 
1912 
April 18 

By paid for collation at Anniversary Meeting $50. 

By paid South Carolina Society for rent of hall 7.0 

By paid Walker, Evans and Cogswell Co., for Transactions No. 18. . . 280.0 
By paid Dr. Robert Wilson for his dues to the Huguenot Society of 

America 5.0 

By paid News and Courier for advertising meeting 1 . 21 

By paid for typewriting for printer: .9 1 

By paid Dr. Robert Wilson for work on Transactions 1.2 

By paid Stephen Thomas and Bro. for 10 gold pins 37. 5( 

By paid Dr. Robert Wilson's dues to the Huguenot Society of London 5 . 1 

By paid U. S. Government for 500 envelopes 10. 6 

By paid postage on Transactions No. 19, letters, etc 18.0 

By paid for sending out Transactions No. 19 5.0 

By paid J. B. Chisolm commissions for year 39.9 

"$46lTs 
Balance 

Permanent fund $382 .02 

General fund 5 . 05 

387.0 

*848 . 6 
Permanent fund on deposit at Charleston Savings Institution. 
General fund on deposit in The Miners and Merchants Bank. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 9 

REPORT OF HISTORIAN 

A list of pamphlets, magazines and other periodicals received 
from societies and individuals for the Huguenot Society of South 
Carolina : — 

1. The New England Historical and Genealogical Society: 
The New England Register, Proceedings of Annual Meeting 
January 31, 1912. 

2. State Historical Society of Missouri: Missouri Historical 
Review, vol. 6, no. 3, April, 1912; vol. 6, no. 4, July, 1912; vol. 
7, no. 1, October, 1912; vol. 7, no. 2, January, 1913; vol. 7, 
no. 3, April, 1913; Sixth Biennial Report for two years ending 
December 31, 1912. 

3. State Historical Department of Iowa: Annals of Iowa, 
vol. 10, no. 2, July, 1911; vol. 10, no. 3, October, 1911; vol. 10, 
nos. 4 and 5, April, 1912; vol. 4, no. 7, October, 1912. Index 
vols. 1 to 8. 

4. Wisconsin Historical Society: Proceedings 1911. Catalogue 
of newspapers, files, service with the Third Wisconsin Infantry, 
and messages and proclamations of Wisconsin War Governors. 

5. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine, 
vol. 13, no. 2, April, 1912; vol. 13, no. 3, July, 1912; vol. 13, 
no. 4, October, 1912; vol. 14, no. 1, January, 1913. 

6. Bowdoin College: Administration numbers 1, May, 1912, 
and Bulletin Librarian Report 1912. Bulletin no. 44, Decem- 
ber, 1912. 

7. Schenectady County Historical Society, 1908 to 1912. 

8. Library of Congress. Descriptive List of Maps of Spanish 
Possessions in the United States, 1502-1820, by Lowery. Pub- 
lications of the Library Issued since 189 7- January, 1913. Re- 
port 1912. 

9. The James Sprunt Historical Publication, vol. 2, no. 2. 

10. Smithsonian Institution. Annual Report of the Ameri- 
can Historical Association, 1912. 

11. The Historical Society of Pennsylvania. The Pennsyl- 
vania Magazine of History and Biography, vol. 36, no. 142, April, 
1912; vol. 36, no. 143, July, 1912. 



. 






10 TRANSACTIONS 

12. Kansas Historical Collections, 1911 to 1912. 

13. The Huguenot Society of London. By-Laws and List 
of Fellows, 1912. Register of the French Church of Bristol, 
vol. 20. Proceedings, vol. 10, no. 1. 

14. A Guide to the National Museum, Stockholm. Forn- 
vannan, 1911, by Emil Ekhoff. 

15. University of California. The Anza Expedition of 1775 
and 1776. Diary of Pedro Font, edited by Taggert. 

' Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. G. Mazyck, Historian. 
April 16, 1913. 



OFFICERS 1914-1915 

President 
THOMAS W. BACOT 

Vice-Presidents 

For Charleston— ARTHUR MAZYCK* 
For Purysburg— DR. WM. H. PRIOLEAU 
For New Bordeaux— CHAS. P. ALLSTON 

Secretary and Treasurer 
DANIEL RAVENEL 

Historian 
WM. G. MAZYCK 

Executive Committee 

DR. T. GRANGE SIMONS 
THEO. G. BARKER 
WILLIAM C. MILLER 
C. BISSELL JENKINS 
CHARLES J. COLCOCK 

The President, Vice-Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer, and Historian are 
ex officio members of the Executive Committee — and all ex-Presidents are advisory 
members. 

♦ Died July 17, 191*. 



11 



MINUTES 

April 13, 1914. 

The Twenty-ninth Anniversary Meeting of the Huguenot 
Society of South Carolina was held this day at the site of the 
old Huguenot Church, on the head waters of Goose Creek, 
one mile northeast of Ladson Station. A special train left 
Charleston at 3 o'clock p. m. with a large number of members 
and guests. 

The meeting was called to order at 4.30 o'clock p. m. by Mr. 
Thomas W. Bacot, President. The Rev. Florian Vurpillot, 
Pastor of the Huguenot Church in Charleston, opened the 
meeting with prayer. The minutes of the previous meeting 
were read and adopted. The President delivered an address, 
which was ordered to be spread upon the minutes and to be 
published in No. 20 of the Transactions. The Treasurer and the 
Historian and the Executive Committee made their annual re- 
ports, which were ordered spread upon the minutes. A committee 
was named to audit the Treasurer's accounts. 

The Executive Committee having passed upon the following 
letters of application for membership, the Society unanimously 
elected the applicants as members : — 

1. Mrs. Marguerite duPont Lee Washington, D. C. 

2. Mrs. Sally Ann Adams Bagnell St. Louis, Mo. 

3. Homer Guerry \Vashington, D. C. 

4. Miss Elizabeth Gibert Harrison Anderson, S. C. 

5. Strobhart H. Seabrook Waycross, Ga. 

6. Mrs. Charles J. Biddle Dixon Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 

7. Mrs. Allie Walker Fox Fort Worth, Texas 

8. Maitland B. Lucas Waycross, Ga. 

9. David Huguenin Charleston, S. C. 

10. Mrs. Louisa Rebecca Bacot Myers 

(Mrs. Thos. E. Myers) Charleston, S. C. 

11. Miss Louisa deB. Bacot Charleston, S. C. 

12. Mrs. Jane McCrady Bacot Elmore 

(Mrs. Samuel E. Elmore) Chicago, 111. 

13. Miss Ellen M. Bacot Charleston, S. C. 

14. Miss Sarah Huger Bacot Charleston, S. C. 

12 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 13 

15. Mrs. Lucy R. F. Holliday Indianapolis, Ind. 

16. Miss Anne King Gregorie Mt. Pleasant, S. C. 

17. Mrs. Harriette Kershaw Leiding Charleston, S. C. 

18. Thomas G. Prioleau New York, N. Y. 

19. Edward Miles Mathewes Spartanburg, S. C. 

20. F. Peyre Porcher El Paso, Texas 

21. Miss Lucia Vera Kirk wood Bennettsville, S. C. 

22. Mrs. Linda C. Grisreiter Pine Bluff, Arkansas 

23. Arthur H. Hirsch Collegeville, Pa. 

24. Rev. Florian Vurpillot Charleston, S. C. 

25. Porcher L'Engle Jacksonville, 11a. 

26. Hon. H. A. duPont Winterthur, Del. 

27. William Bruce Carrier Valdosta, Ga. 

28. Mrs. D. Hugh Stevens Monroe City, Mo. 

29. Pierre Gibert Greenwood, S. C. 

30. Mrs. Florence Griffith Miller (Life Member) Asheville, N. C. 

31. Stephen Thomas (3rd) Charleston, S. C. 

32. Mrs. Mary Amanda Harvin .Charleston, S. C. 

33. Alexander Hex Chisolm New Orleans, La. 

34. Ren6 Ravenel Charleston, S. C. 

35. Mrs, Mumford Gregg Scott Florence, S. C. 

36. Mrs. F. Agnes Dibble Moss Orangeburg, S. C. 

37. Mrs. Phoebe Baker Lanneau Charleston, S. C. 

38. Mrs. F. H. H.' Calhoun Clemson College, S. C. 

39. Mrs. James Thompson Reid Navy Yard, Charleston, S. C. 

40. Mrs. William R. Pritchard Charleston, S. C. 

41. L. C. Shecut Orangeburg, S. C. 

42. Jos. C. Thomas Charleston, C. S. 

43. Miss Eva Lillian Fickling Macon, Ga. 

44. Miss Virginia L. Maury Washington, D. C. 

45. Frank Bostick Martin Washington, D. .C. 

46. Douglas O. Morgan Washington, D. C. 

47. Mrs. Samuel T. Fisher Washington, D. C. 

48. Stephen Thomas, Jr. (4th) Charleston, S. C. 

49. Mrs. Lyons Lee Washington, D. C. 

On motion it was unanimously resolved that Dr. Robert Wil- 
son, who had served the Society as President for seventeen years, 
and Dr. J. Bachman Chisolm, who had served the Society as 
Secretary and Treasurer for seven years, be elected Honorary 
Members of the Society. 

Mr. George S. Holmes reported for the Committee appointed 
at the last anniversary meeting to revise the Constitution and 
By-Laws. This report was ordered spread upon the minutes, 



14 TRANSACTIONS 

to be acted on at the next regular meeting of the Society, 
and is as follows: — 

To the Huguenot Society of South Carolina: 

The special Committee, to whom it was referred at the last 
meeting of the Society to revise the Constitution and By-Laws, 
etc., report that they have considered the matters referred to 
them and recommend the adoption of the following proposed 
changes or 'amendments of the Constitution and By-Laws: 

1. Article III, Section 1, of the Constitution: Add to sub- 
division "Firstly" the following words: "and the wife or hus- 
band (as the case may be) of any such descendant;" so that the 
said subdivision will read, as follows: 

"Firstly, All descendants in the direct male or female lines 
of the Huguenot families which emigrated to America prior to 
the promulgation of the Edict of Toleration, November 28, 
1787: and the wife or husband (as the case may be) of any such 
descendant." 

2. Article III, Section 6, of the Constitution: Insert immedi- 
ately after the word "elected" the following words: "and his 
or her membership shall begin with the Anniversary (April 13) 
nearest to the date of his or her letter of application;" so that 
such part of the said section will read as follows: 

Section 6. * * * "If their report be favorable, the candi- 
date shall be considered as duly elected; and his or her mem- 
bership shall begin with the Anniversary (April 13) nearest to 
the date of his or her letter of application." * * * 

3. Article IV, Section 1, of the Constitution: (1) Insert the 
words "of the seven" between the word "each" and the word 
"original," and (2) add the letter "s" to each of the words "cen- 
tre" and "settlement," and (3) insert the words "and a Chap- 
lain" immediately after the words "an Historian," and (4) in- 
sert the words "and the seven" between the words "the Presi- 
dent" and the word "Vice-Presidents," and (5) insert the word 
"and" between the word "Vice-Presidents" and the words "the 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 15 

Secretary and Treasurer" and also between the words "the 
Secretary and Treasurer" and the words "the Historian," and 
(6) strike out the words "and five members elected by the So- 
ciety;" so that the said Section will read as follows: 

"Section 1. The officers of the Society shall consist of a Presi- 
dent, a Vice-President for each of the seven original Huguenot 
centres or settlements in South Carolina, a Secretary and Treas- 
urer, an Historian, and a Chaplain, and an Executive Com- 
mittee composed 6f the President and the seven Vice-Presidents 
and the Secretary and Treasurer and the Historian (and all 
ex-Presidents of the Society shall be advisory members of said 
Committee with all the privileges of membership except the 
right to vote)." 

4. By-Laws, Section 2: (1) Insert the words "at least" 
between the word "require" and the word "fifteen," and (2) in- 
sert the words "of the Society" between the word "members" 
and the words "to constitute," and (3) insert between the word 
"quorum" and the words "for the transaction of business" the 
words "of the Society, and at least three members of the Execu- 
tive Committee to constitute a quorum of the Committee;" so 
that the said Section will read as follows : 

"Section 2. It shall always require at least fifteen members 
of the Society to constitute a quorum of the Society, and at 
least three members of the Executive Committee to constitute 
a quorum of the Committee, for the transaction of business." 

5. By-Laws, Section 6: Strike out the words "on signing the 
Constitution" and the parenthesis marks enclosing them. 

6. By-Laws, Section 7: (1) Insert between the word "Hugue- 
not" and the word "settlements" the words "centres or," and 
(2) insert between the word "Charleston" and the word "Purys- 
burg" the following words: "Goose Creek, Orange Quarter (St. 
Denis), French Santee, St. John's Berkley;" so that the said 
Section will read as follows: 

"Section 7. The original Huguenot centres or settlements in 
this State (each one of which is entitled to a Vice-President) 



16 TRANSACTIONS 

are as follows: (1) Charleston, (2) Goose Creek, (3) Orange 
Quarter (St. Denis), (4) French Santee, (5) St. John's Berkley, 
(6) Purysburg, and (7) New Bordeaux." 

George S. Holmes, 
April 13, 1914. of and for the Committee. 

On motion it was unanimously resolved that the report of the 
special Committee to revise the Constitution and By-Laws be 
published in the forthcoming Transactions, or else be printed 
separately and mailed to each member of the Society. 

The President read a letter from Miss C. P. Ravenel, Pres- 
ident of the Huguenot Church Aid Society, inviting the Hugue- 
not Society of South Carolina to co-operate with them in the 
erection of a monument in the Huguenot Church to the late 
Col. David duBose Gaillard. On motion it was resolved that 
the Huguenot Society of South Carolina contribute Twenty- 
five dollars ($25.00) towards this monument, and the Treasurer 
was instructed to pay that amount. 

The President appointed Messrs. George S. Holmes, M. deLisle 
Haig and Eugene N. Simons a committee to nominate officers for 
the ensuing year. The Committee reported as follows : President, 
Thomas W. Bacot; Vice-President for Charleston, Arthur 
Mazyck; Vice-President for Purysburg, Dr. Wm. H. Prioleau; 
Vice-President for New Bordeaux, Charles P. Allston; Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, Daniel Ravenel; Historian, Wm. G. Mazyck; 
Executive Committee: Dr. T. Grange Simons, Theo. G. Barker, 
Wm. C. Miller, C. Bissell Jenkins and Chas. J. Colcock. On 
motion these gentlemen were unanimously elected. 

The business of the meeting being over, the President intro- 
duced the Rev. Florian Vurpillot, Pastor of the Huguenot Church 
in Charleston. Mr. Vurpillot delivered a very able address on 
the "Edict of Toleration. " At the close of the address Mr. 
Vurpillot was asked to turn over his manuscript to the Society 
in order that it may be published in the next Transactions. 

The President in his address (among other things) gave an 
interesting account of the old church site now owned by the 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 17 

Society, and of the country in the immediate neighborhood, 
after which the meeting adjourned and the members went to 
the sacred site where the Society has erected a monument. 

Refreshments were then served, wherupon the party returned 
to Charleston at 7.30 o'clock p. m. 

Daniel Ravenel, Secretary. 

STATEMENT 

of 

Daniel Ravenel, Treasurer, for the year ending April 13, 1914. 

1913 Receipts 

April 13 

To balance from last year $387 . 07 

To members' dues April 13, 1913, to April 13, 1914 567 . 15 

To sale of Transactions 9 . 30 

To sale of badges 45. 25 

To interest on permanent fund for year 16.09 

$1024.86 
1913 Disbursements 

April 15 

By paid for rent of hall for Anniversary Meeting $7 .00 

By paid collation at Anniversary Meeting 50.00 

By paid postage. 18.21 

By paid President's dues to Huguenot Society of America 5 . 00 

By paid Walker, Evans and Cogswell, printing Transactions No. 19. 310.00 

By paid "The News and Courier" for advertising 3 .40 

By paid 25 silver badges 31 . 25 

By paid flowers sent to funerals of deceased members 5.00 

By paid extra help in making out new set of books, relisting mem- 
bers, etc 10,00 

•By paid cabinet file 22.00 

By paid books, printing and stationery 51 . 20 

By paid exchange on checks for year 1.10 

By paid commissions to Treasurer on $637.79 63 . 77 

$577.93 
Balance 

Permanent fund $437 . 91 

General fund 9.02 446.93 

$1024.86 



18 TRANSACTIONS 

REPORT OF HISTORIAN 

Charleston, S. C, April 13, 1914. 

I respectfully report that during the past year I have received 
the following books and pamphlets: 

From the Library of Congress: Report for 1913. List of 
Publications since 1897. Classification, Classes E and F America. 

From Michigan Historical Commission, Bulletin no. 2. 

From ^Historical Department of Iowa, Annals, vol. xi, nos. 2-3. 

From Bowdoin College, Bulletin, no. 50. 

From State Historical Society of Missouri, Review, vol. 8, no. 2. 

From Smithsonian Institution, Annual Report American His- 
torical Association, 1911, vol. 2. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. G. Mazyck, Historian. 

REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

To the Huguenot Society of South Carolina : The Executive 
Committee report, as follows: — 

On November 22 last, in consequence of letters received 
from Rev. Robert Wilson, D.D., and Dr. J. Bachman Chisolm, 
insisting upon their resignations as President and as Secretary 
and Treasurer respectively, the Committee held a meeting and 
accepted the resignations with regret, and under Section 7 of 
Article IV of the Constitution appointed T. W. Bacot as Presi- 
dent and Daniel Ravenel as Secretary and Treasurer for the un- 
expired terms of those offices, to wit, until the next Anniversary 
Meeting of the Society. 

Dr. Wilson for over sixteen years had been the honored and 
valued head of the Society and Dr. Chisolm had been its Secre- 
tary and Treasurer for over eight years, so that the Society must 
keenly feel the severance of such ties. It is fortunate that Dr. 
Wilson can and will continue to give his very valuable assistance 
to the Society as an advisory member of the Executive Commit- 
tee. The Committee recommend to the Society the election 
of Dr. Wilson and Dr. Chisolm as Honorary Members in recog- 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 19 

nition of the Society's very great esteem for them individually 
and of their long and faithful official services. 

At the last meeting of the Society it was referred to a special 
Committee to revise the Constitution and By-Laws of the Society 
— this Committee has discharged its duty and will make its report. 

In consequence of the long continued illness of the Secretary 
and Treasurer the financial affairs of the Society had become 
confused and involved; but, by indefatigable work, Mr. Daniel 
Ravenel, the present Secretary and Treasurer, is straightening 
them out — when he took charge there was a balance of but forty- 
four (44) cents in- the general fund of the Treasury and outstand- 
ing bills of One hundred and ninety dollars ($190.00) — his report 
shows the matter in detail. 

The resignations from the Society since the last Anniversary 
number only three, viz., Miss Mary E. Huger, Miss Mat tie 
Knox and Mrs. L. R. Selkirk. On the other hand, it is very 
gratifying to report that letters of application have been re- 
ceived from forty-nine persons, one of whom applied for life 
membership and all of whom are reported favorably by the 
Executive Committee. 

The necrology of the Society for the past year is grievous: 

1. Our honored ex-President and one of our charter members; 
Wm. St. Julien Jervey. 

2. Our valued Vice-President for Charleston and one of our 
charter members, Stephen Thomas (2nd). 

3. Our famed member, Col. David duBose Gaillard. 

4. One of our original and most interested members, Thomas 
L. Broun of Charleston, West Virginia. 

5. Our honorary member, Miss Emma C. Black. 

6. Our esteemed member, Dr. F. Lejau Parker. 

7. Mrs. Agnes S. Parry, one of our charter members. 

The Executive Committee bring to the attention of the Socie- 
ty the request of the Huguenot Church Aid Society that this 
Society do make a contribution to the erection of a stone in the 
Huguenot Church in memoriam Col. David duBose Gaillard. 

T. W. Bacot, Chairman. 

April 13, 1914. 



20 TRANSACTIONS 



PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

Anniversary Meeting April 13, 1914 

Associates and Brethren of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina — 
Ladies and Gentlemen: 
On this 13th day of April, A.D. 1914, (the 13th day of April 
being the anniversary of the notable "Promulgation of the Edict 
of Nantes, granting Freedom of Worship to the Huguenots of 
France," and, consequently, constituted by the Constitution 
of our Society as the day for its Anniversary Meeting), it is a 
personal privilege, mingled with peculiar pleasure and proper 
pride, for me to stand in your presence and greet you with the 
mantle of the Presidency so recently fallen upon my shoulders : 
and yet the pleasure is fraught with pain, because, by the abso- 
lute and insistent resignation (reluctantly accepted) of the Rev- 
erend Robert Wilson, D.D., we have been deprived of the serv- 
ices of an honored and valuable and valued President, who for 
over sixteen years faithfully presided over our Society — fortunate- 
ly, however, his invaluable services are not wholly lost to 
us, as, under Constitutional provision, all ex-Presidents of our 
Society are constituted advisory members of its Executive 
Committee. Likewise, we have been deprived of the services 
of our esteemed Secretary and Treasurer, J. Bachman Chisolm, 
M.D., who filled the office for over eight years. The passing of 
Dr. Wilson and Dr. Chisolm from their official places on the 
stage of our Society (incorporated, as it is, in perpetuity) suggests 
the closing words of the murmuring reply of "The Brook" to 
its plaintive questioner, as sung by the laureate Tennyson: 

For men may come and men may go, 
But I go on forever. 

We congratulate ourselves upon being able to gather to-day 
under the shade and shadow of these stately old moss-laden 
live-oaks (mute witnesses to and sentinels of "the dead past" 
of this historic and, to us, sacred section) within view of yon 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



21 



granite Cross with its inscriptions and yon four granite corner 
posts, but a few steps in front of me, erected by our Society in 
1910 to mark the site of the old, but alas! now extinct, French 
Protestant or Huguenot Church with its adjacent grave-yard 
here at the head of Goose Creek, which was established and built 
about 1694 by the ancestors of some of us here present, and to 
which sacred shrine we shall in a few moments, immediately 
after our business meeting, wend our way in pilgrimage. I bid 
you thrice wel'come hither and yon. 

The Transactions of our Society (No. 16-1909) record the 
generous and public spirited and valuable gift to the Society 
by the Honorable Henry A. M. Smith (an honored Honorary 
member) of such "God's acre," and the correspondence between 
him and the Society on the subject, and the action of the Society 
thereon, along with two sketch maps, showing the exact location 
of the site, and with an historical account by him of the same 
and also of the "French settlers who owned lands and seemed to 
have resided in the vicinity arid were, therefore, presumptively 
members of the congregation" of the old church: and Transac- 
tions No. 17 (1910) record the incorporation of the Society by 
the Secretary of State of South Carolina on the twenty-first of 
June, 1909, and the subsequent execution and registration in 
July, 1909, of the deed of conveyance of such "God's acre" from 
Mr. Smith to the Society in trust, as well as the consummation 
of the whole matter by the erection of yonder monument — but 
there is nothing like actually "viewing the premises," so to speak, 
as we now and here do. 

According to Mr. Smith's very interesting and valuable his- 
toric account, the following are the names of French Protestant 
settlers in this immediate neighborhood: Bacot,Boisseau,Bruneau , 
Dassex or Dasseu, du Pont, Faucheraud, Flenry, Franchomme, 
Godin, Guerin, Marion, Porcher, Postell, Trouillart, Verdity: 
also Filbein and Goble, which are possibly French. 

In front of me to the left, and within sight, lies the tract of 
land originally granted in 1696 to Dr. Isaac Porcher, the emi- 
grant ancestor of the Porcher family, whereon he settled. 



22 TRANSACTIONS 

Only a few hundred yards in front of me, on the other side of 
yon "God's acre," was the home of my own ancestor, Pierre or 
Peter Bacot, son of the emigrant of the same name, which 
was composed of lands originally granted to John Boisseau and 
to Isaac Porcher and of part of lands granted to Jonathan 
Fitch, and which remained in the family for three generations 
until 1799 — his father (the emigrant) had settled on the south- 
western side of Ashley River in the later St. Andrew's Parish 
on lands granted to him and now a part of the * Middleton 
Place" tract. 

Benjamin Marion, the emigrant ancestor of the Marion fam- 
ily, early settled not far hence. 

The Faucheraud settlement (one of the earliest) was nearby — 
the ruins of the old mansion, which apparently was a large and 
massive building of brick, being yet visible. 

But it is especially interesting to know that yonder site of 
the old church with its burying-ground, as well as the spot where 
we are now holding our .meeting, was part of a tract of land 
which was originally granted in 1696 to Abraham Fleury, Sieur 
de la Plaine, (one of the earliest settlers in this vicinity) and 
which adjoined the Boisseau (afterv/ards Bacot) tract and the 
Faucheraud tract: and it is also a matter of singular pleasure to 
have with us two of that name, Mr. Louis S. Dclaplaine (a 
member of our Society) and his mother, Mrs. Robert Delaplaine, 
who generously and liberally contributed towards the expenses 
of erecting yonder monument, and who have just made a long 
and tedious journey from their distant home in Wheeling, West 
Virginia, for the single purpose of being present on this inspiring 
occasion. 

As far as we know, there have been seven (7) distinct and 
separate settlements of French Protestants or Huguenots in 
South Carolina, to wit: (1) at "Charles Town," as Charleston 
was originally called; (2) at the head of Goose Creek, in the 
later Parish of St. James, Goose Creek, and in the present Comity 
of Berkley, (where we are gathered today); (3) at the "Orange 
Quarter," in the old Parish of St. Denis (later the Parish of St. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 23 

Thomas and St. Denis), and in the present County of Berkley; 
(4) at "French Santee," on the Santee River, in the later Parish 
of St. James, Santee, and in the present County of Berkley; (5) 
at a locality said to have been between the later Nelson's 
Ferry Road and the southwestern line of the later St. Stephen's 
Parish and between the later Biggin Church and Black Oak 
Church, in the later Parish of St. John, Berkley, and in the 
present County of Berkley; (6) at Purysburg, near the Savannah 
River, in the present County of Beaufort; and (7) at Bordeaux, 
near Little River, in the present County of Abbeville: and in 
each of these settlements was organized a French Protestant 
or Huguenot Church, the organization of which in the four 
said later Parishes of St. James, Goose Creek, and St. Thomas 
and St. Denis, and St. James, Santee, and St. John, Berkley,* 
and the erection of church buildings in some if not all of the 
four, antedated the creation and establishment of those Parishes 
A.D. 1706 and the subsequent erection of their parochial church 
buildings by the English government. 

The church site of the Charleston settlement (the earliest) 
has always been marked — it is now marked by the beautiful 
Gothic church building at the southeast corner of Church and 

* Dr. Dalcho, in his Historical Account of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
South Carolina (pp. 264-5), says: "In 1707, the Rev. Robert Maule, A.M., arrived 
in Charles-Town as a missionary from the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 
in Foreign Parts," and "the Governor and Council * * * soon after appointed him 
to the Cure of St. John's Parish," Berkley. * * * * "Mr. Maule was the hrst 
Clergyman of the Church of England, who had resided there for any time. No 
Episcopal Church had yet been built; but Mr, Maule performed Divine Service in the 
Church of the French Protestants, by the invitation of its Clergyman, Mr. Tuilliard." 
(TrouillardorTrouillart?). It is interesting, too, to note Dr. Dalcho's reference to 
"the French Chalice" of the Sacramental Plate of this Parish — he says at page 273: 
"A Chalice of Silver, gilt, was presented to the Parish. It had been used by the 
Protestants in France, before the revocation of the Edict of Nantz, and was 
brought to Carolina by the Rev. Mr. Lessou, formerly Minister of a French Con- 
gregation in this Province." (The name "Lessou" should probably be "Lescot.") 

See also Dr. Dalcho's reference, at page 288, to "a small" French Protestant or 
Huguenot Church at "Orange Quarter" in the Parish of St. Thomas and St. Denis — 
and see, too, "Annals and Registers of St. Thomas' and St. Denis' Parish, §outh 
Carolina," from 1680 to 1884, by the Rev. Robert F. Clute, Rector. 



24 TRANSACTIONS 

Queen Streets — and concerning this Charleston French Protes- 
tant or Huguenot Church, it is both gratifying and worthy of 
notice that it is the only French Protestant or Huguenot Church 
in America that has persistently and continuously preserved its 
autonomy and special individuality and independent existence 
up to this time, its present pastor being the Reverend Florian 
Vurpillot, who, as we know, has recently succeeded the revered 
and venerable Reverend C. S. Vedder, D.D., (its pastor for well 
nigh half a century, and now the Nestor of the Clergy in Charles- 
ton if not in South Carolina), and who has opened this meet- 
ing with prayer and is to follow me and to edify us with an his- 
toric and appropriate address. 

The church site of this Goose Creek settlement has recently 
been marked by our Society, as has been already fully narrated. 

It only remains for our Society to locate and mark the church 
sites of the other five settlements — a sacred duty, that we have 
hope and expectation of fulfilling. 

With the inspiration of this historic and sacred ground on 
this interesting and noteworthy occasion, we go back in grate- 
ful and loving remembrance to our ancestors, who, in their na- 
tive land across the sea, had been "troubled on every side, yet 
not distressed — perplexed, but not in despair — persecuted, but 
not forsaken — cast down, but not destroyed;" and who "had 
fled from persecution and death at home, and sought an asylum 
amidst the woods and swamps of Carolina," where ("filling up 
waste places * * * which were soon to blossom as the rose 
under their skillful and laborious cultivation") they could wor- 
ship God in peace and in "the full, free and undisturbed liberty 
of their consciences," i.e., in "that blessed liberty wherewith 
Christ hath made us free," and where they and all other "religious 
denominations of Christians" would be "left at full and equal 
liberty to model and organize their respective churches, and 
forms of worship, and discipline, in such manner as they might 
judge most convenient for their future prosperity, consistently 
with the constitution and laws of their country." It was 
their faith that sustained them — by faith they forsook France, 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 25 

not fearing the wrath of the king or the pope, for they endured 
as seeing Him who is invisible — like the early martyrs, some 
were slain with the sword, some escaped the edge of the sword 
— out of weakness they were made strong — some were tortured, 
not accepting deliverance — others had trial of cruel mockings, 
and scourgings, yea, moreover, of bonds and imprisonment — 
they were destitute, afflicted, tormented — and this, not at the 
hands of heathen, but at the hands of fellow Christians (so-called). 

France's loss was the gain of Great Britain and the British 
Colonies, especially South Carolina, and of Germany and Hol- 
land and Switzerland — all asylums of refuge for persecuted 
French Protestants or Huguenots, who now "rest from their 
labours" and whose "works, do follow them." 

We have a godly and goodly heritage of them, our ancestors, 
to whom we may point and of whom we may speak with justi- 
fiable pride: yet, - emulating their good examples and their vir- 
tues, be it ours to justify ourselves by our own works and con- 
duct in the living present ("working out our own salvation with 
fear and trembling," as it were, and not content merely to exist 
passively on the good names of our forefathers and on faith and 
pride in "the dead past," whereby we would deteriorate and so 
be unworthy of them), to the end that we may be able to bequeath 
and transmit a like godly and goodly heritage unto our children, 
and that their posterity, from generation to generation in the 
nascent future, may likewise possess such a heritage — for "by 
works a man is justified, and not by faith only." 



26 TRANSACTIONS 

CHARTER OF THE SOCIETY 

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA 

Executive Department 
by the secretary of state 

Certificate of Incorporation 

Whereas, Robert Wilson, Arthur Mazyck and T. W. Bacot, all of Charleston, 
S. C, two or more of the officers or agents appointed to supervise or manage the 
affairs of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, which has been duly and 
regularly organized, did on the 21st day of June, A.D. 1909, hie with the Secre- 
tary of State a written declaration setting forth: 

That at a meeting of the aforesaid organization held pursuant to the by-laws 
or regulations of the said organization, they were authorized and directed to apply 
for incorporation: 

That the said organization holds, or desires to hold, property in common for a 
Religious, Educational, Social, Fraternal, Charitable or other eleemosynary pur- 
pose, or any two or more of said purposes, and is not organized for the purpose of 
profit or gain to the members, otherwise than is above stated, or for the insurance 
of life, health, accident or property; and that three days' notice in the Evening 
Post, a newspaper published in the County of Charleston, has been given that 
the aforesaid Declaration would be filed: 

And Whereas, That said Declarants and Petitioners further declared and affirmed : 

First. Their names and residences are as above given. 

Second. The name of the proposed Corporation is Huguenot Society of 
South Carolina. 

Third. The place at which it proposes to have its headquarters or be located 
is Charleston, S. C. 

Fourth. The purpose of the said proposed Corporation is Fraternal, Historical 
and Social. 

Fifth. The names and residences of all Managers, Trustees, Directors or other 
officers are as follows: 

Rev. Robert Wilson, D.D., President and ex officio member of Executive 
Committee. 

Stephen Thomas, Vice-President and ex officio member of Executive Committee. 

Thomas W. Bacot, Vice-President and ex officio member of Executive Committee. 

Charles P. Allston, Vice-President and ex officio member of Executive Committee. 

Dr. J. Bachman Chisolm, Secretary and Treasurer and ex officio member of 
Executive Committee. 

Wra. G. Mazyck, Historian and ex officio member of Executive Committee. 

Sixth. That they desired to be incorporated in perpetuity. 

Now, Therefore, I, R. M. McCown, Secretary of State, by virtue of the author- 
ity in me vested by Chapter XL VIII, Article II, Code of 1902, and Acts amenda- 
tory thereto, do hereby declare the said organization to be a body politic and 
corporate, with all the rights, powers, privileges and immunities, and subject to 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 27 

all the limitations and liabilities, conferred by said Chapter XLVIII, Article II, 
Code of 1902, and Acts amendatory thereto. 

Given under my Hand and the Seal of the State, at Columbia, this 21st day of 
June in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and nine and in the one 
hundred and thirty-third year of the Independence of the United States of America. 

R. M. McCown, 

{Seal 1 Secretary of State. 

of 
State J 

R. M. C Office, Charleston County, S. C, 
Recorded June 26th, A.D., 1909, in Book "L-24" page 519. 
Julius E. Cogswell, 
R.M.C. 



28 TRANSACTIONS 

DEED OF CONVEYANCE OF OLD HUGUENOT GOOSE 
CREEK CHURCH SITE TO THE SOCIETY 

The State of South Carolina: 

Know All Men by These Presents, That I, Henry A. M. Smith, 
of the City of Charleston in the State aforesaid, in consideration 
of the good and valuable considerations me hereunto moving 
and of One Dollar to me in hand paid at and before the sealing of 
these Presents < by Huguenot Society of South Carolina, 
a body corporate under the laws of the State aforesaid, (the 
receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged), have granted, bar- 
gained, sold and released, and by these Presents do grant, bar- 
gain, sell and release, unto the said Huguenot Society of 
South Carolina 

All that lot or parcel of land containing about one acre lying 
and being in Berkley County in the State of South Carolina near 
the Public Road from Dorchester to Goose Creek commonly 
called the Ladson Road and about one mile North East from 
Ladson Station on the Southern Railway Carolina Division 
being the site of an old French Church and Cemetery and but- 
ting and bounding on all sides on lands of the Orphan Aid Society 
as will more fully appear by the plat thereof hereto annexed — ■ 
together with a right of way for access to and egress from the 
same for pedestrians and vehicles along the most direct route 
from the Public Road as denoted by the dotted or pricked line 
on said plat — as all the same were conveyed to me by the Orphan 
Aid Society by Deed dated 2nd. July 1908 Recorded in the office 
of the Registrar of Mesne Conveyances for Berkley County in 
Book A-No. 29 page 6. 

Together with all and singular the Rights, Members, Heredita- 
ments and Appurtenances to the said Premises belonging, or in 
anywise incident or appertaining. 

To Have and to Hold, all and singular the said premises be- 
fore mentioned unto the said Huguenot Society of South 
Carolina its successors and assigns forever; In Trust never- 
theless to hold possess mark and take care of the same as a me- 






" «* y / / " 







ScoJe &> CAa/ns • /320 A«?/ 




SKETCH MAP OF THE SITE OF THE OLD AND EXTINCT FRENCH PROTESTANT 
OR HUGUENOT CHURCH (ESTABLISHED ABOUT A. D. 1694, ON THE HEADWATERS 
OF GOOSE CREEK) WITH ITS SURROUNDING GRAVEYARD, AND SHOWING SOME 
NEIGHBORING HUGUENOT LAND OWNERS. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 29 

morial of the establishment of the ancient French Huguenot 
Church on St. James Goose Creek and as a cemetery and burial 
place as by that Church heretofore established. 

Witness my Hand and Seal this Eighth day of July in the year 
of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and nine and in the 
one hundred and thirty-fourth year of the Sovereignty and In- 
dependence of the United States of America. 

Signed, Sealed and Delivered 1 TT . , , « /ton 

« t, r } Henry A. M. Smith (L.S.) 

in .Presence of J 

K. H. Price 

Matthew J. Blanche 

The State of South Carolina 
Charleston County. 

Personally appeared before me, Matthew J. Blanche and made 
oath that he saw the within named Henry A. M. Smith sign, 
seal, and as his Act and Deed deliver the within written Deed; 
and that he with K. H. Price witnessed the execution thereof. 

Sworn to before me, this 8th 1 _ _, 

j r t i a -^ <nnn } MATTHEW J. BLANCHE 

day of July A.D. 1909 J J 

Julian Mitchell 
(L.S.) Not. Pub. for S. C. 

RENUNCIATION OF DOWER 

The State of South Carolina, 1 
Charleston County. J 

I, Arthur R. Young, Notary Public, do hereby certify unto 
all whom it may concern, that Mrs. Emma R. Smith, wife of 
the within named Henry A. M. Smith, did this day appear before 
me, and upon being privately and separately examined by me, 
did declare that she does freely, voluntarily, and without any 
compulsion, dread, or fear of any person or persons whomsoever, 
renounce, release and forever relinquish unto the within named 
Huguenot Society of South Carolina its successors and assigns, 
all her interest and estate, and also all her right and claim of 



30 TRANSACTIONS 

Dower, of, in, or to all and singular the premises within men- 
tion and released. 

Given under my Hand and Seal, this eighth day of July Anno 
Domini 1909 

Emma R. Smith 
Arthur R. Young 
(L.S.) Notary Public S. C. 

Recorded the tenth day of July, A.D. 1909, in Volume A-30, 
page 222, Mesrte Conveyance Office, Berkley County, S. C. 
Plat same book and page. 

(The Plat annexed to this Deed was published in "Transac- 
tions" No. 16 of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, and 
so is not here printed.) 

iFrom "The Sunday News," Charleston, S. C, April 17, 1910.1 

OLD CHURCH'S SITE MARKED 

Huguenot Society Erects Granite Cross Where House 
of Worship Stood 

This Society held its annual meeting last Wednesday after- 
noon, 13th inst., at the hall of the South Carolina Society, as 
usual. 

The features of this, the 25th Anniversary of the Society, 
were the address of the Hon. A. T. Clearwater, of Kingston, 
N. V., which is printed in full in this issue, and the monument 
erected on the site of the old and extinct French Church of Goose 
Creek, a sketch of which is appended. 

One of the objects set forth in the constitution of the Hugue- 
not Society of South Carolina is: "To discover, collect and 
preserve all still existing documents, monuments, etc., relating 
to the genealogy or history of the Huguenots of America in gen- 
eral, and of the State of South Carolina in particular." 

Mr. Thomas W. Bacot, in an address delivered before the 
Society at its annual meeting in 1904, called special attention 
to the French Protestant Church at Goose Creek, of which, as 




■rA -^ iJX 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 31 

he said, "former chroniclers appear to have been ignorant or 
oblivious," and at the same meeting it was "Resolved, that this 
Society erect upon the site of such of these (Huguenot) churches 
as have disappeared a suitable stone or tablet" — and it was 
referred to the executive committee to carry this out when- 
ever possible. 

Last year Mr. Henry A. M. Smith, who had become the owner 
of the tract, of land on which stood this old French Protestant 
Church of Goose Creek (established about 1694 by the French 
Protestants w r ho settled in that neighborhood) very generously 
donated to the Society, in trust to mark the spot, an acre of land, 
the site of the old Church and burying ground; and the Executive 
Committee, in compliance with the resolution just mentioned, 
has had erected by Mr. E. T. Viett, himself a French Protestant, 
a handsome and enduring monument. 

It consists of a heavy granite cross of rustic finish upon a block 
with concave sides, two of which are polished and inscribed, 
and this again standing on a base three feet square; the whole 
being about five feet in height. 

The inscriptions are — On the front: 

"Site of the ancient and extinct French Church of Goose 
Creek, with its surrounding Burying Ground. Established 
about 1694 by French Protestants." 

On the back: 

"Erected A. D., 1910, by the Huguenot Society of South Car- 
olina, on this God's Acre, donated to the Society in trust 8th 
July, 1909." 

This monument is set in the centre of the plot and a granite 
post marks each of the four corners of the acre. The land lies 
about a hundred yards to the left of the old public road from 
Dorchester to Monck's Corner, and about a mile north-eastwardly 
from Ladson station, on the Southern Railway. It constitutes 
a part of the old De La Plaine settlement, and some of that name 
(Mrs. De La Plaine, now of Wheeling, W. Va., and her son and 
daughter) have contributed liberally to the erection of the 
monument. 



32 TRANSACTIONS 

Among the French Protestant settlers of the neighborhood 
appear from the records such family names as the following: 
Bacot, 13oisseau,Bruneau, Dasseau, du Pont, Faucheraud, Fleury 
de la Plaine, Franchomme, Guerin, Godin, Marion, Porcher, 
Postell, Trouillart, Verdity. 

THE EDICT OF TOLERATION 1787 

Address Delivered by the Reverend Florian Vurpillot, 

Pastor of the Huguenot Church, Charleston, S. C, 

before the huguenot society of south 

Carolina, April 13, 1914 

In the annals of the Huguenots three dates outrank all others, 
viz.: 

1598. When the "Edict of Nantes" granting religious free- 
dom to Protestants was signed by Henri IV who termed it "per- 
petual and irrevocable;" 

1685. When the above "Edict of Nantes" was revoked by 
Louis XIV; 

1787. When the "Edict of Toleration" granting again to 
Protestants religious freedom and civil equality was signed by 
Louis XVI. 

The Edict of Toleration is the subject of the present address. 

Louis XIV's end was fast approaching. Five months before 
it came, the King's confessor, Jesuit Letellier, on the eighth of 
March, 1715, obtained from the old and fatigued monarch an 
ordinance which makes one shudder: "Any person who shall 
have declared that he wished to persist and die in the Pretended 
Reformed Religion, either with or without a previous abjura- 
tion, shall be held as a relaps." A monstrous fiction was thus 
spread all over France: "There is no longer any Protestant in 
the Kingdom," and the King wrote the following lines which 
need no explanation: "The fact that those who belonged to the 
Pretended Reformed Religion have remained in our Kingdom 
after we abolished the aforesaid Pretended Reformed Religion 
is a more than convincing proof that they have embraced the 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 33 

Catholic Apostolic and Roman Religion, or else they would have 
been neither suffered nor tolerated in our Kingdom." The con- 
sequence of such declarations was that, in and by remaining in 
France, a Huguenot was considered a de facto Catholic. 

It is a well known fact indeed, that immediately after the 
Revocation, the death of Heresy was gloriously proclaimed, 
celebrated, chanted, painted, immortalized: Bossuet, Flechier, 
Massillon with their eloquence, LaFontaine, Fontenelle and 
Mme. Deshoulieres in poetry, Mme. de Sevigne and Mile, de 
Scudery in their letters, Lesueur in a famous painting, all united 
in a concert of jubilation, enthusiasm, praise, adulation; a medal 
was struck off, a bronze statue of Louis XIV, trampling Heresy, 
was erected in Paris, and Mme. de Maintenon, who with her 
royal husband shared the responsibility of the Revocation, said 
with the authority of her rank: "Before long, it will be ridiculous 
to be of that religion." No more Protestants in France! All 
converted! The fact was that they were gagged and silenced. 
Tacitus had said a long time ago: "Ubi solitudinem faciunt, 
pacem appellant" 

Was Protestantism entirely weeded from French soil? It is 
sadly true that some Huguenots became Catholics, some others 
sold their consciences to the renegade Pelisson or Foucault for 
a sum of money, but the great majority left France. We shall 
not relate here that lamentable Exodus with all its incidents — 
some tragic, some comic, all pathetic — which led this new kind 
of Pilgrims upon another via dolorosa to Holland, whose queen, 
Wilhelmina, mindful of her Huguenot lineage, placed three years 
ago a wreath upon the Coligny monument in Paris; England, 
whose King George V has Huguenot blood running in his veins; 
Prussia, whence their victorious grandsons came back to France 
in 1871; South Africa, where their descendants heroically fought 
for independence during the Transvaal war; America, where two 
of their grandsons, John Jay and Henri Laurens, were among 
the four signers of the treaty of Paris which granted independence 
to the United States; South Carolina — but here, I must stop. 
Members of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina! You 



34 TRANSACTIONS 

are the remnants of a noble race; the race of men who chose 
exile and martyrdom rather than surrender their consciences. 
Proud of our name, faithful to our lineage, we jealously cultivate 
in the bottom of our hearts the sweet flower of remembrance, 
and we gather together in this pious pilgrimage to perpetuate 
the memory of our glorious ancestors and imitate their virtues. 
But the Huguenots who had the courage to leave France must 
not make us overlook those who had the courage to remain. 
For obvious reasons, it is utterly impossible to tell how many 
thus braved the King's wrath and lived, in hiding, a wretched 
and perilous life, but outside of Paris, in Toulouse, Montauban, 
everywhere in the south of France, gallows were kept perma- 
nently busy, so that this period has been appropriately called 
"The Church under the Cross." In 1718, just three years after 
Louis XIV's death, the Huguenot martyrology records the names 
of Pastors Hue, Vesson, Etienne Arnaud, executed in Alais, and 
almost every following year, new victims are added, among which 
we will briefly mention Pastors Louis Ranc, Jacques Roger, 
Mathieu Mazal, Francois Benezet, Etienne Tessier, Louis Gibert 
who was fortunate enough to make good his escape, and while 
his brother Etienne went to England, he came to Charleston 
where he died in 1773, and whose descendants we are proud 
and happy to see in our midst today. In 1761 Pastor Pochette 
and the three brothers Grenier were arrested, summarily tried 
and condemned to capital punishment. Four at one time! 
That was enough to stir up public opinion. Indeed, if "under 
Louis XIV people dared not to speak a word, under Louis XV 
they dared to whisper," awaiting the propitious moment when 
under his successor, they would talk loudly. An appeal for 
toleration was then sent to J. J. Rousseau, a Protestant, by 
Ribotte-Charron of Montauban in behalf of the four victims, 
but Rousseau, "the friend of men," the author of the Confes- 
sion of Faith of the Savoyard Vicar which appeared in the very 
same year, Rousseau answered that . . . he was sick! Re- 
buffed by Rousseau, Ribotte-Charron approached, without any 
better success, some Encyclopedists, D'Alembert, Marmontel 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 35 

and finally appealed to Voltaire! Voltaire, whom Victor Hugo 
called "Satan" — but poets are often one-sided and Plato ban- 
ished them from his Republic — Voltaire who always had fever 
on the anniversary of the Massacre of St. Bartholomew, Vol- 
taire who fought a life-long and merciless battle against Fanati- 
cism, Voltaire, who almost on the brink of his grave, blessed 
Franklin's grandson by laying his emaciated hand on the lad's 
head and saying to him only two words "God and Liberty," 
Voltaire wrote 'immediately to Richelieu, startled all Europe over 
the miscarriage of justice of which the Protestant Calas had just 
been the unfortunate victim and kindled everywhere a desire 
for Liberty and Equality. 

But on the other hand and in the meantime, however, the 
Clergy was not inactive and in 1765 its General Assembly said 
to the King that had the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes been 
fully carried out, there would be not one Protestant found in 
the Kingdom; in 1772 the same body brought again before the 
King "the State's danger arising from associations of heretics." 
In 1775 the King was coronated and swore upon the Holy Gos- 
pel to extirpate heresy. In 1780 the General Assembly of the 
Clergy of France reminded the King of his sacred pledge and 
Louis XVI yielding to petitions, promised to carry out his oath, 
but this was only the faint voice of a weak man sitting upon a 
worm-eaten throne which was doomed soon to crumble down. 

Toleration was in the air. As early as 1754 Turgot who in 
so many respects, was ahead of his time, demanded already the 
separation of the two powers and said to the non-Catholics: 
"You, submit yourselves to Laws, keep on being useful citizens 
and you will find in me the same protection as all other subjects." 
Bishop Becdelievre of the diocese of Nimes, during the forty- 
five years of his episcopacy, showed a most commendable tol- 
erance and when he died, Pastor Rabaut St. Etienne pronounced 
his eulogy. Abbe Bourlet Vauxelles said in 1762 before the 
French Academy: "The God of Peace does not like the slaughter- 
ing of those who know Him not." Abbe Audra used his influ- 
ence to have a Protestant marriage made lawful and valid. Abbe 



36 TRANSACTIONS 

Bastide sheltered in his house Pastor Paul Vincent who was 
chased by soldiers. Finally, the Tower of Constance was opened . 
Oh! that cursed dungeon! It reminds of Dante's Inferno on the 
gates of which were inscribed these dreadful words: 

"Lasciate ogni speranza voi che'ntrate" 

When the dungeon was opened, fourteen women came out, 
the youngest being 45 years old, having been secreted since the 
age of eight years, that is to say during 37 years! She had been 
arrested for betaking herself to a Protestant assembly. If you 
ever visit the Tower of Constance at Aigues-Mortes, you will see 
on the granite of the wall the word "Resistez"* which the women 
martyrs carved with the point of a knife. And yet, Mme. de 
Maintenon had said: "Before long it will be ridiculous to be of 
that religion!" 

In 1786 Baron Breteuil, a minister of the King's household, 
presented to Louis XVI a pamper, written up by Rulhiere for the 
purpose of enlightening the Sovereign upon the causes of the 
Revocation, and later read to him a memoir on the necessity of 
giving to Protestants citizenship with all its rights. 

Louis XVI was slow in making up his mind; his limited intel- 
ligence had somewhat a superstitious fear of touching upon the 
laws passed by his predecessors. While Louis XIV with a stroke 
of his pen repealed the so-called perpetual and irrevocable Edict 
of Henri IV, Louis XVI trembled at the idea of correcting the 
monstrous iniquity of Louis XIV. Could there not be found in 
France a man who, as a leader, generous, liberal-minded and 
strong, would champion the noble cause of Justice? Yes, there 
was such a man: Lafayette; Lafayette who had gloriously fought 
for the Independence of the Colonies, and with his we must 
associate the name of George Washington, as the latter had 
strongly urged Lafayette to become interested in the case of 
the French Protestants. As American citizens, if we closely 
unite Lafayette and Washington in a sacred thankfulness, as 
Huguenots, we unite them also in the revered remembrance of 

* The word is misspelt "Recislcz." 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 37 

the services which both rendered to our forefathers. Back from 
America, Lafayette paid a visit to Pastor Rabaut St. Etienne, 
embraced the pious old man and invited his son Paul Rabaut 
to come to Paris and plead before the King the cause of his co-reli- 
gionists. In 1787 the "Notables" of the Kingdom held their 
meeting - , and we learn from the minutes that Marquis de la 
Fayette moved to beseech His Majesty to grant citizenship to 
Protestants and also to reform the criminal Laws; whereupon 
Comte d' Artois — the King's brother — opposed the motion as 
being not in order, but offered to speak of it to His Majesty if 
so directed by the Assembly. The motion of Marquis de la Fay- 
ette Was unanimously carried. Without losing time, an address 
was immediately drawn up to the effect of calling the kindness 
of His Majesty upon that large number of his subjects who were 
wronged by a regime contrary to religion, morals, national in- 
dustry and all the principles of ethical policy. 

At last, the "Edict of Toleration" was signed by the King on 
November 17, 1787. The word "Protestant" was not mentioned, 
the document referred only to the "non-Catholics" and the first 
article affirmed again that the Catholic, Apostolic and Roman 
Religion alone was to continue to enjoy in the Kingdom the priv- 
ilege of public worship. In fact the new Edict granted to the 
'/non-Catholics:" 

1. The right of living and trading in France without any mo- 
lestation on account of religion. 

2. The right of being lawfully married by civil officers. 

3. The right of legitimate birth. 

4. The right of being dispensed with the services of a Cath- 
olic priest for the burial of the dead. 

But at the same time the Protestants remained absolutely 
excluded from public or state positions such as teachers, judges, 
city counsellors. 

Who would believe it? This minimum of concessions aroused 
a storm of protests, and the Parliament of Paris refused to record 
the Edict. Mr. De la Cretelle said to that illustrious body 
that the Virgin Mary had appeared to him telling him to speak 



38 TRANSACTIONS 

against the Huguenots, and Mr. d' Espremenil pointing out to 
his colleagues a picture of Jesus Christ exclaimed: "Do you wish 
to crucify Him once more?" But his oratorical outburst had 
no bearing and finally the Edict was recorded January 27, 1788. 
Out of 96 counsellors, 17 voted "nay." 

Immediately after, the Clergy changed its attitude and the 
Archbishop of Narbonne, speaking to the King said: "In giving 
thanks to Your Majesty for removing from our altars the danger 
of falsehood or perjury, we shall never question the sweet names 
of fathers and husbands given to our brethren . . . We bless 
Your Majesty for restoring the precious harmony which ought 
always to prevail between the Laws and the Rights of Nature. 
Remove, Sire, from your ordinance the severe punishments 
which Reason, Justice and Humanity disapprove." 

It is very regrettable that the Bishops waited so long before 
speaking such a lofty language, as it was even too late, and soon 
Toleration was no longer acceptable. Indeed, on the twenty- 
eighth of August, 1789, Rabaut St. Etienne, a constituent from 
Nimes, the son of the venerable Pastor of the Desert, said amidst 
the long applauses of the Assemblee Constituante: "Toleration! 
It is not what I claim; I claim Liberty. Toleration, support, 
pardon, clemency! Ideas supremely unjust, as long as it shall 
be true that difference of Religion is not a crime. Toleration! 
I demand that it be banished — and it will be banished this awful 
word which represents us as citizens worthy of pity." 

The French Revolution ratified this noble language by in- 
scribing on the new escutcheon of FYance: 

Liberty — Equality — Fraternity. 



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HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 39 

THE LATE DAVID du BOSE GAILLARD 
Lieutenant Colonel, U. S. Army 

David duBose Gaillard was a scion of a noted family of 
South Carolina, which was one of the first to seek refuge in the 
British Province of Carolina from persecution in France — among 
other distinguished members of this family should be mentioned 
(1) John Gaillard, who was a United States Senator from South 
Carolina, serving from 31st January, 1805, until his death at 
Washington, D. C, 26th February, 1826, and for fourteen years 
President pro tempore of the Senate; (2) Edward Samuel Gail- 
lard, M.D., of national reputation and a surgeon in the Confed- 
erate Army, who died in Louisville, Kentucky, 1st February, 
1885; (3) Peter Charles Gaillard, a graduate of the United 
States Military Academy and for a while a Second Lieutenant 
U. S. A., Colonel C. S. A., Mayor of Charleston, and Treasurer 
of Charleston County at the time of his death 11th January, 
1889; (4) Theodore Gaillard Thomas, M.D., "the beloved 
physician," a resident of New York City for many years, who 
died 28th February, 1903. 

On his mother's side, the subject of this sketch was of another 
noted Huguenot family, duBose, now represented by the re- 
nowned theologian, Rev. William Peronneau duBose, D.D., 
residing at Sewanee, Tennessee, (among others). 

A son of Samuel Isaac Gaillard and Susan Richardson (nee 
duBose) his wife, he was born in Clarendon County, South 
Carolina, on the fourth day of September, 1859, but his parents 
shortly afterwards moved to Fairfield County, S. C, where his 
early life was spent. He was appointed to the United States 
Military Academy from Sumter County (which originally in- 
cluded Clarendon County), S. C, and he was graduated from 
that institution on the fifteenth day of June, 1884, and promoted 
in the army to Second Lieutenant, Corps of Engineers, sub- 
sequently passing through all intermediate grades to that of 
Lieutenant Colonel, which last grade he attained on the 
eleventh day of April, 1909. 



40 TRANSACTIONS 

On the sixth day of October, 1887, at Winnsboro', S. C, he 
was married to Miss Katherine Ross Davis, a daughter of Henry 
Clarence Davis and Isabel Harper (nee Means) his wife, of Ridge- 
way, S. C, and a sister of R. Means Davis, late Professor of 
History and Constitutional Law at the University of South 
Carolina, and is survived by her and their son David St. Pierre 
Gaillard. His untimely death happened at Johns Hopkins 
Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, on the fifth day of December, 
1913, when he was near the completion of his great service 
in connection with the construction of the Panama Isthmian 
Canal, of which Culebra Cut is his monument — he needs no 
other — and in justice to his memory the name of this Cut 
should be changed from ''Culebra' 5 to "Gaillard." 

Both the Senate and the House of Representatives of the 
Congress of the United States immediately after his death paid 
fitting and glowing tributes to his invaluable services and work 
in connection with the construction of that great Canal. 

General Orders, No. 31, issued by command of the Chief of 
Engineers at Washington, D. C, on the ninth day of December, 
1913, enumerates his services to the country, as follows: 

"He served with the Battalion of Engineers at Willets Point, 
N. Y., September 30, 1884, to April 18, 1887; as assistant to 
the officer in charge of river and harbor works in Florida until 
November, 1891; as member of the International Boundary 
Commission between the United States and Mexico, November, 
1891, to November, 1896; assistant in local charge of defensive 
works at Fort Monroe, Va., February 12 to October 10, 1895; 
assistant in local charge of Washington Aqueduct and in charge 
of Washington Aqueduct and water supply of the city of Wash- 
ington, D. C, October 11, 1895, to May 3, 1898, except when 
engaged on survey of Portland Channel, Alaska, August to 
November, 1896; engineer officer on the staff of Maj. Gen. 
James F. Wade, United States Volunteers, May 6 to June 11, 
1898. He was appointed colonel, Third Regiment, United 
States Volunteer Engineers. June 7, 1S9S, and was in command 
of his regiment in the United States and in Cuba from June 12. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 41 

1898, to May 17, 1899, when honorably mustered out of vol- 
unteer service. 

"Served as assistant in connection with the Washington Aque- 
duct, May 22 to September 9, 1899; as assistant to the Engineer 
Commissioner, District of Columbia, September 9, 1899, to 
March 6, 1901; in charge of river and harbor works, with sta- 
tion at Duluth, Minn., March 9, 1901, to June 6, 1903; on special 
duty in connection with the General Staff Corps, at Vancouver 
Barracks, Wash., June 9, 1903, to January 11, 1904. Member 
of the General Staff Corps, August 15, 1903, to May 18, 1904; 
as Chief of Staff, Department of the Columbia, October 13, 
1903, to January 9, 1904; assistant to the Chief of Staff of the 
Northern Division, January 15 to October 31, 1904; on special 
duty at headquarters of the Northern Division, November 1-13, 
1904; under instruction at the Army War College, November 
14, 1904, to March, 1905. Member of the General Staff Corps, 
March 23, 1905, to March 22, 1907; assistant to the Chief of 
Staff of the Expedition to Cuba, September 29, 1906, to Febru- 
ary 21, 1907. Member of the Isthmian Canal Commission, 
March 22, 1907. Supervisory engineer in charge of dredging 
in the harbors, of building the necessary breakwaters, and of 
all excavations in the canal prism, except that incidental to lock 
and dam construction, April, 1907, to June, 1908; Division 
Engineer, Central Division (including Culebra Cut), Isthmian 
Canal, July, 1908, to the date of his death. 

4c**** ******* 

"Colonel Gaillard was the author of Professional Papers No. 
31, Corps of Engineers, 'Wave Action in Relation to Engineer- 
ing Structures.' " 

David duBose Gaillard has left a legacy, more valuable than 
mines of Golconda, not only to his family but also to the Hugue- 
not Society of South Carolina (of which he was one of the most 
distinguished members) as well as to his State and to the 
Country at large. 

In his honor, the Huguenot Church Aid Society and the 
Huguenot Society of South Carolina have united in placing in 



42 TRANSACTIONS 

the Huguenot Church, Charleston, S. C, a mural tablet or 
memorial stone, along with similar tablets to distinguished 
Huguenots. It is in position on the eastern inside wall of the 
church, between the tablet to Mathew Fontaine Maury and 
the tablet to Gen. W. H. F. Lee, and in appearance and form is 
as herein pictured. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 43 

iFrom "The Daily Telegraph," London, England, of Tuesday, August 26, 1913.) 

THE HUGUENOTS 

A Fugitive People — Settlement in England — Influence 

on Character 

by a correspondent 

The Huguenots. Not many years ago I was a guest at a 
dinner at the French Hospital, in the East-end. It is a great 
red-brick building, standing in large grounds of its own, between 
Victoria Park and Hackney-common; and there a number of 
the age-worn and out- worn are looked after till the end of their 
lives. The society is rich, and asks alms from none. It merely 
carries out the original duties laid upon it by the French Prot- 
estant founders, and to this day, from the hour of his admit- 
tance, Stephen Brown becomes Estienne Brown in the records 
of the hospital. Here, significantly enough, is a hand-loom, at 
which the inmates work or play — good brocade is still made for 
great ceremonies; and the broad grass lawns and the great trees 
convey a sense of homeliness that no public park can rival. Well, 
I was dining there. The plate was old and nobly worn, and 
there was a sedate and certain comfort combined with a good 
cuisine — how, indeed, could it be otherwise? Toasts were given 
in English and in French. At last there came a knock at the 
door. The chairman replied, and the secretary, who had left 
his seat some minutes before, opened the door. 

A , GREAT TOAST 

The comedy was exquisite. "Who are you?" said the chair- 
man, as if he had never seen him before. "Sir," answered the 
secretary, "I am the secretary of, the French Hospital, and I beg 
leave to ask the guests of- the hospital to drink of a loving-cup to 
the prosperity of our society." "Well enough," responded the 
chairman; and the large silver loving-cup was placed in the sec- 
retary's hand. "Stay," said the chairman; "What is it that 



44 TRANSACTIONS 

you have in that cup?" Then followed one of the most beauti- 
ful ceremonies that survive in London today. 

"Sir," said the secretary, taking a step forward, "this cup is 
compounded of many things. In it there is the wine of Bor- 
deaux, to remind us of the country from which our fathers came. 
There is in it brandy, to tell us of that strong virtue which led our 
fathers in an hour of trial to prefer their faith even to their Father- 
land. There is in it sugar, to bear witness to the kindliness with 
which our fathers ever treated those who oppressed them so 
sorely. There is . . ." But I cannot recall the dainty 
grace with which every one of the ingredients of the cup was used 
to illustrate some one of the circumstances or the simple excel- 
lences of the Huguenots. I can, however, say that no more 
beautiful ritual is carried out in London today. And it is right 
that it should be so, for as the cup went round there was not 
a man who did not realise a little better than before the strong, 
certain, undeviating character of the men who were driven from 
France for conscience' sake, and out of necessity, rather than 
choice, became the salt of England's trade. 

THE ORIGIN OF THE HUGUENOTS 

Of the actual name, Huguenot, it is impossible to find any cer- 
tain derivation. It was, however, soon associated with French- 
speaking refugees into England from the religious persecution of 
the sixteenth century. At first the greater number came from 
the dominions of the Holy Roman Emperor. Walloons and 
Dutch arrived in a considerable body during the reign of Henry 
VIII. With his usual large views, Henry refused to surrender 
any religious refugee. From the beginning of his reign to the 
end he little realised the enormous part that he was playing in 
the renascence of Christianity, and probably he would have 
scouted the idea that even at the end of his life he was a sympa- 
thizer with Luther. But it was a different matter wherever ter- 
ritorial rights were concerned, and Henry's long, tight upper 
lip stiffened at the mere whisper of extradition. 




;*C&*..' 



AN OLD HUCUENOT CHURCH. NOW THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH I\ ST. 
MARTIN'S STREET AND ORANGE STREET NEAR LEICESTER SQUARE, LONDON 
WHICH IS ABOUT TO DISAPPEAR. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 45 

It was not, however, till Edward VI's reign that definite so- 
cieties of Huguenots began to form in London and in Canterbury. 
The first thing they asked for was liberty to trade. After a 
brief and futile opposition on the part of certain antiquated 
guilds that had attempted to compete with their special trades 
the Huguenots almost monopolised the textile industry in Lon- 
don. Their application was incredible, the fineness of their 
touch beyond anything dreamed of before in England, their 
taste and originality a source of amazement and inspiration to 
the plain Londoner, and their economy of life almost as valuable 
as any other quality they possessed. Did they not introduce 
ox-tail soup into this country? 

So invaluable, indeed, were the capabilities of the Huguenots 
that, strange as it appears when stated today in black and white, 
the scarlet hats of Cardinals were made for two centuries in 
Wandsworth after the dignity itself had been officially repudiated 
by this country. 

TIMES OF TRIAL 

The accession of Queen Mary caused a sudden blight in the 
prospects of these trader-teachers. In Canterbury itself, which 
was still the magnet of Protestant devotion, thirty-one men and 
women were burned alive during her reign, and the bewildered 
refugees largely sought safety in the Netherlands, where the 
Dutch were slowly making secure their independence. But 
from the deaths of Mary and Cardinal Pole in 1558 the welcome 
for Huguenots was certain. Little by little the financiers, the 
minor but most competent statesmen, the greater merchants, 
the theologians, and the women to whom faith was greater than 
worldly advantage came" back across the Channel. They un- 
derstood England as England hardly understood itself, and when 
the day of trial came in 1588, the trainbands of Canterbury mus- 
tered to the roll of Huguenot drums. 

So the great tale goes on. Great Protestant families in France 
formed great families in England. The textile trades connected 



46 TRANSACTIONS 

with artistry fell inevitably into the hands of the kindly foreign- 
ers. The arch-province of Canterbury lent them a habitation 
and a home in the Undercroft of the cathedral, where it is pos- 
sible that they were also permitted to carry on their industrial 
labours. 

The massacres of Saint Bartholomew made a turning-point. 
Among all the insensate, semi-religious crimes that have ever 
stained the pages of a great race, these will probably claim a 
high place. But the massacres were not so much a crime as a 
blunder. ' They were the final challenge of the Pope — who, to 
his eternal advertisement, held a special service of thanksgiving 
in their honour and struck a medal to commemorate them — 
against Western independence. But the game was already lost 
for him, and the wave of reaction against the Papacy carried 
the Huguenots into an industrial and social position that assured 
their future. The Edict of Nantes in 1598, combined with the 
military success of the Netherlanders, checked the inflow of Hu- 
guenots into this country, but the leaders of the movement 
understood well enough the ephemeral nature of the announce- 
ment, and the stream of emigres from France soon began again. 
In 1685, after the revocation of the Edict, it became a flood, 
and few things in our history are more to our credit than our 
simple acceptance of the best gift any country has unconsciously 
made to another. 

historian's tribute 

The chapel that is about to be pulled down near Leicester- 
square has had a chequered career, and only in its earliest stages 
had it any connection with the Huguenot tradition. But there 
is a certain interest in any memorial of those spacious days, and 
one cannot but remember the tribute of the historian Strype. 
He writes of the Protestant Strangers, "who as in former days, 
so of late, have been forced to become Exiles from their own 
Country for their Religion, and for the avoiding cruel Persecu- 
tion. Here they have found Quiet and Security, and settled 
themselves in their several Trades and Occupations; Weavers 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 47 

especially. Whereby God's Blessing surely is not only brought 
upon the Parish but also a great Advantage hath accrued to the 
whole Nation, by the rich Manufacturers of weaving Silks and 
Stuffs and Camlets; Which Art they brought along with them. 
And this Benefit also to the Neighborhood; that these Strangers 
may serve for Patterns of Thrift, Honesty, Industry, and So- 
briety as well." This is a noble eulogium of the Huguenots, and 
deserves to be remembered. As a practical proof of the virtues 
which he here commends so highly, the insistent presence of a 
line of Huguenot blood in the majority of our greater men today 
is curious. Wherever one turns, that strain of capacity, cour- 
tesy, and uncompromising loyalty still marks the man of Hugue- 
not descent — and these are qualities that we can ill afford to 
lose in the unstable maelstrom of modern activity. Whether 
a church remains or not is of small moment, but it is a matter of 
importance to us that we should still have in our veins the stub- 
born ability that has played no small part in the elevation to 
the first rank of the industrial workers of England — and, be it 
added, of the United States as well. 



48 TRANSACTIONS 

HUGUENOTS, THE FIRST TEXTILE 
MANUFACTURERS 

The Society is indebted to its valued member, Dr. Yates 
Snowden, of the University of South Carolina, for the following 
article which he has copied from Ilistoire et Commerce des Colo- 
nies Anglaises dans VAmerique Septentrionale (Nouvelle edi- 
tion), A la Haye, 1755 — De la Caroline et de la Nouvelle Georgie — 
(p. 213):— 

"Quelques families s'y sont adonnees a elever des vers a 
soye. Les profits qui ont ete faits dans cette partie de l'cecono- 
mie rurale n'ont pas jusqu'ici invite le plus grand nombre a 
les imiter. II y en a pourtant qui ont eu jusqu' a 40 et 50 
livres sterlings [sic] (920 et 1150 livres Tournois) de la recolte 
de leurs soyes, sans que leurs autres travaux en ayent souffert 
parce qu'on occupe au gouvernement des vers les Negrillons et 
Negrites qui seroient incapables de faire rien de plus profitable. 
Cette soye s'employe dans le pays melee avec de la laine. On 
en fait des droguets. Outre cette manufacture, les habitans 
de la Caroline ont une fabrique de toiles que les Protestans 
Francais qui s'y sont refugies y ont portee." 

TRANSLATION 

History and Commerce of the English Colonies in North 
America (New Edit ion), The Hague, 1755 — concerning Carolina 
and New Georgia — (p. 213): — 

" Some families have applied themselves to raising silk worms. 
The profits derived from that branch of rural economy have not 
thus far invited the majority to imitate them. There are some, 
however, who have made as much as forty and fifty pounds sterl- 
ing (920 and 1150 Tours livres or francs) from the harvest of 
their silks, without their other business having suffered there- 
from, because in the management of the worms are employed 
little negroes and negresses who would be incapable of doing 
anything more profitable. In the country, this silk is used mixed 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



49 



with wool. From it druggets are made. Besides this industry, 
the people of Carolina have a manufacture of linen, which the 
French Protestant Refugees brought there." 

The foregoing article shows that the French Protestants were 
in all probability the first to start textile manufactures in South 
Carolina — as to which, as well as the culture of the vine and 
the olive and Jhe manufacture of wine and oil, see "The His- 
tory of Methodism in South Carolina" (pp. 34-35), by the Rev- 
Albert M. Shipp, D.D., and also McCrady's "South Carolina 
Under the Proprietary Government 1670-1719" (p. 321). 



50 TRANSACTIONS 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE 

HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH 

CAROLINA 

CONSTITUTION 
Article I 

Name 

The name of this organization shall be "The Huguenot Society of South 
Carolina." 

Article II 

Object 

The object of the Society shall be: 

Firstly, To Perpetuate the memory and to foster and promote the principles 
and virtues of the Huguenots. 

Secondly, To publicly commemorate at stated times the principal events in the 
history of the Huguenots. 

Thirdly, To discover, collect and preserve all still existing documents, mon- 
uments, etc., relating to the genealogy or history of the Huguenots of America in 
general, and of those of South Carolina in particular. 

Fourthly, To gather by degrees a library for the use of the Society, composed 
of all obtainable books, monographs, pamphlets, manuscripts, etc., relating to the 
Huguenots. 

Fifthly, To cause statedly to be prepared and read before the Society, papers, 
essays, etc., on Huguenot history or genealogy and collateral subjects. 

Article III 
Membership 

Section i. The membership of this Society shall be as follows: 

Firstly, All descendants in the direct male or female lines of the Huguenot fam- 
ilies which emigrated to America prior to the promulgation of the Edict of Tolera- 
tion, November 28, 1787. 

Secondly, Representatives of other French families, whose profession of the 
Protestant Faith is anterior to the promulgation of the Edict of Toleration, No- 
vember, 28, 1787. 

Thirdly, Pastors of French Huguenot congregations in South Carolina. 

Fourthly, Writers who have made the history, genealogy, principles, etc., of the 
Huguenots a special subject of study and research, to whatever nationality they 
may belong. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 51 

Section 2. The members of the Society may consist of three classes: Resi- 
dent, Corresponding and Honorary; hut the rights and privileges of each class 
shall be the same. 

Section 3. The annual fees of Resident and Corresponding members shall 
be one dollar, and the payment of twenty dollars shall constitute one a life mem- 
ber. All dues shall be paid in advance. 

Section 4. The funds of this Society shall be applied only to the furtherance 
and realization of the objects contemplated in this constitution. 

Section 5. All life-membership fees shall be invested by the Executive Com- 
mittee (hereinafter provided for) in the name of the Society, and only the interest 
arising therefrom shall be used for the purposes of the Society. 

Section 6. Application for membership, with a statement of the name, ad- 
dress, profession, and descent of the applicant, shall be made in writing to the 
Executive Committee, who shall report thereon at the next meeting of the Society. 
If their report be favorable, the candidate shall be considered as duly elected; but 
if demanded, the election shall be by ballot, and a two-thirds vote of the members 
present shall be necessary to elect. Every application for membership shall be 
accompanied by one year's dues. 

Article IV 

Officers 

Section 1. The officers of the Society shall consist of a President, a Vice- 
President for each original Huguenot centre or settlement in South Carolina, a 
Secretary and Treasurer, an Historian; and an Executive Committee composed 
of the President, Vice-President, the Secretary and Treasurer, the Historian, and 
five members elected by the Society, and all ex-Presidents of the Society shall be 
advisory members of said Committee with all the privileges of members except the 
right to vote. 

Section 2. Besides the ordinary rights and duties of a presiding officer, the 
President shall appoint the places of meeting; in conjunction with the Secretary 
and Treasurer he shall have the power, and upon the written request of five mem- 
bers it shall be his duty, to call special meetings of the Society, and he shall sign 
all drafts drawn on the Treasurer. 

Section 3. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Presidents to interest in the objects 
of this Society the Huguenots of the localities which they represent; in the absence 
of the President of this Society, a Vice-President shall preside and exercise all the 
rights and privileges of the President; and if more than one Vice-President be pres- 
ent, the senior Vice-President in attendance shall be the presiding officer. 

Section 4. It shall be the duty of the Secretary and Treasurer to keep an ac- 
curate record of all the proceedings of the Society and of the Executive Committee; 
to conduct the correspondence of the Society; to notify members of the meetings of 
the Society; to inform officers and new members of their election. 

It shall also be his duty to collect all dues, fees and other moneys belonging to 
the Society, and to deposit the same in some bank in the City of Charleston in the 
name of the Society. Out of these sums he shall pay such sums only as may be 
ordered by the Society through its President, or the Executive Committee. He 
shall keep an accurate account of its receipts and disbursements, and render an 



52 TRANSACTIONS 

account of the same at each annual meeting of the Society, whit h shall name a 
committee to audit them. For his services he shall he allowed ten per centum of 
all amounts collected by him. 

Section 5. It shall be the duty of the Historian to have in his keeping all books, 
pamphlets, manuscripts, etc., pertaining or belonging to the Society, and to re- 
ceive and collect data relating to the History of the Huguenots before and since 
their settlement in America. 

Section 6. It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee to examine and 
pass upon the credentials of candidates; to invest and manage the funds of the 
Society; to engage suitable persons to deliver the addresses and prepare the papers 
contemplated' in this constitution, and to make all other arrangements necessary 
for the meetings of the Society and to transact all business of the Society no! <,ih<-r- 
wise provided for in the constitution. 

Section 7. The officers of the society shall be annually elected at the anni- 
versary meeting; but if any vacancy occur during the year the Executive Committee 
shall have power to appoint a member of the Society to fill such vacancy for the 
unexpired term. 

Article V 

Meetings 

This Society shall hold two regular meetings each year and, in accordance with 
the purpose of the Society, the said meetings shall take place on the following his- 
torical dates: 

Section 1. The Anniversary Meeting shall be held on April 13, the day of 
the Promulgation of the Edict of Nantes, granting Freedom of Worship to the 
Huguenots of France. 

Section 2. The Autumn Meeting of the Society shall be held on the 22nd of 
October, the date of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. 

Section 3. The Executive Committee shall have power to arrange for a dinner, 
or other collation, annually, as they may deem most appropriate. 

Section 4. In case any of these dates should fall upon a da}' inconvenient for 
the proper, celebration thereof, the Executive Committee shall appoint for the 
meeting the next most convenient day. 

BY-LAWS 

Section 1. Notices of meetings shall be given at least one week in advance. 
Section 2. It shall always require fifteen members to constitute a quorum for 
the transaction of business. 

Section 3. At all meeting of the Society the order of business shall be as follows: 
Prayer. 

1. The reading and adopting of the minutes of the previous meeting. 

2. Reports of officers. 

3. Reports of the Executive Committee. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Reports of special committees. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 53 

6. Miscellaneous, business. 

7. Election of ofJicers. 

8. The reading of papers or delivery of addresses before the Society. 

9. Adjournment. 

Section 4. All resolutions must be presented in writing tu the Chair. 

Section 5. If any member neglect or refuse to pay his annual fee for two con- 
secutive years the Treasurer shall report his name to the Executive Committee, 
who may strike his name from the roll of membership. 

Section 6. Such members of the Society as do not themselves bear Huguenot 
names shall add to their own names (on signing the constitution) the Huguenot 
names through which they claim descent. 

Section 7. The 6riginal Huguenot settlements in this State, each one of which 
is entitled to a Vice-President, are as follows: Charleston, Purysburg and New 
Bordeaux. 

Section 8. The Constitution and By-Laws of this Society may be amended 
or repealed at any meeting of the Society by a two-thirds vote; but the changes 
proposed must have been submitted at a previous meeting. They may also be 
amended or repealed by a vote of a majority of all the members of the Executive 
Committee at any meeting during the recess of the Society: Provided, the amend- 
ment so adopted shall be confirmed at the next meeting of the Society. 



54 TRANSACTIONS 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE SOCIETY 

Transactions No. 1. Published in 1889. 

An account of the organization of the Society in 1885. 
List of Charter members. 
List of officers, 1885 to 1889. 

Memorial to Genl. Wilmot G. deSaussure, late president of the Society. 
Short sketches of the lives of late members. 
President Daniel Ravenel's Anniversary Address. 

Address by Win. St. Julien Jervey, Esq., delivered at the Anniversary Meet- 
ing, April 13, 1889. 
Transactions No. 2. Published in 1889. 

An historical sermon delivered at the French Protestant Church, on Sun- 
day, April 13, 1890, by the Rev. Charles S. Vedder, D.D., Pastor; with 
picture of Church and list of Pastors from 1686 to 1890. 
Proceedings of the Anniversary Meeting, April 14, 1890. 
List of officers and new members. 
Ivry, a poem by Rev. C. S. Vedder, D.D. 
An address before the Society by Hon. Thomas. F. Bayard. 
Transactions No. 3. Published in 1894. 

Report of President Wm. St. Julien Jervey, at Anniversary Meeting, April 13, 

1891, and list of officers of the Society. 
President's Address at Anniversary Meetings of 1893 and 1894. 
List of officers and list of members elected since 1890. 
Short sketches of the lives of deceased members. 

An address before the Society, on the Early Huguenots and their Emigration 
to America, by Gabriel E. Manigault, M.D. 
Transactions No. 4. Published in 1897. 

Papers on some Early Huguenot Families in South Carolina: a, The Legare 
Family; b, The linger Family, with pedigree; c, The Marion Family; 
</, The Manigault Family from 1665 to 1886, with portraits. 
A paper on the Huguenot Influence in Colonial South Carolina, by Rev. Robt. 

Wilson, D.D. 
Sketches of the lives of late deceased members of the Society. 
Transactions No. 5. Published in 1898. 

The First Huguenot Immigrants from 1670 to 1680, 1680 to 1690, 1690 to 1700. 
Hostility of the English Settlers to the French. 
Naturalization of Huguenot Refugees. 

List of names of French and Swiss Huguenot Refugees in Carolina. 
Character of the Huguenots. 

The Huguenot Churches in South Carolina; St. John's Parish, Berkley; St. 
Denis' Parish, "Orange Quarter;" Settlement and Church on Santee River. 
The Huguenots of Abbeville, S. C. 
Founding of the South Carolina Society of Charleston. 
Notices of Conspicuous Members of the Gaillard Family. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 55 

Transactions No. 6. Published in 1899. 

An Historical Sketch of the Prioleau Family in Europe and America, with 
illustrations, by Rev. Robt. Wilson, D.D., and Gabriel Manigault, M.D. 

The Ravenel Family in France and America, by Daniel Ravcnel, Sr. 

Necrology 1896-1897. 
Transactions No. 7. Published in 1900. 

Proceedings of the Fifteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, April 21, 1900. 

List of officers. 

An Historical Sketch of the Huguenot Congregations of South Carolina: 
French Santee; Orange Quarter; St. John's, Berkley; the Church at Charles- 
ton: etc. — by the late Daniel Ravenel, of Charleston, with notes by the late 
Gen. Wilmot G, DeSaussure, of Charleston. 
Transactions No. 8. Published in 1901. 

Proceedings of the Sixteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, April 13, 1901 . 

Anniversary address of President Robert Wilson, D.D. 

Resume of Transactions, 1897 to 1901. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 

List, of members with names of original Huguenot Families from whom de- 
scended. 

Letter from the Honorable Alfred Huger, upon the death of Mr. Petigru. 

A Narrative of the Life and Services of Francis G. DcLieseline during the 
War of the American Revolution, contributed by Dr. Wm. C. Ravenel. 
Transactions No. 9. Published in 1902. 

Minutes of the Seventeenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, April 17, 1902. 

The President's address. 

An address on the Early Huguenots, delivered before the Society by Col. Rich- 
ard L. Maury, of Richmond, Va. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 

Enlarged and revised list of members, with name or names of persons from 
whom they derive their descent. 
Transactions No. 10. Published in 1903. 

Minutes of the Eighteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held 
April 15, 1903. 

List of officers. 

The President's Address. 

Report of oflicers. 

Some wills of South Carolina Huguenots; copies in original French, with trans- 
lations in English. 

A paper, entitled The Huguenots in Dublin, by Rev. Robt. Wilson, D.D. 
Transactions No. 11. Published in 1904. 

Minutes of the Nineteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held 
April 13, 1904. 

Anniversary Address of President Robert Wilson. 

A brief memorial to Francis Marion. 

"The Huguenots of South Carolina," an Address before the Society, by Mr. 
Thomas W. Bacot. 



INDEX 

Paget 

Address of the President 1914. .."..• 20-25 

Address of Rev. Florian Vurpillot, 1914 32-38 

By-Laws of Society 52-53 

Charter of Society 26-27 

Clipping from The Sunday News 30-32 

Clipping from The Daily Telegraph 43-47 

Constitution of Society 50-52 

Deaths 1913-1914 19 

Executive Committee's Report 1914 18-19 

Historian's Report 1913 9-10 

Historian's Report 1914 18 

Huguenots, the First Textile Manufacturers in Carolina 48-49 

Minutes of Anniversary Meeting 1913 6-8 

Minutes of Anniversary Meeting 1914 12-17 

New Members 1913 . 7 

New Members 1914 12-13 

Notes of Information to Members, etc 4 

Officers 1913-1914 5, 7 

Officers 1914-1915 . 11, 16 

Picture of Granite Cross Marking Old Huguenot Goose Creek Church 

Site facing 3 1 

Picture of "Memorial Tablet to Lt. Col. David duBose Gaillard facing 39 

Picture of Old Huguenot Church in London facing 46 

Prize Essay Notice 3 

Publications of Society 54-58 

Report of Special Committee to Revise Constitution and By-Laws 13-16 

Resignations 1913-1914 19 

Sketch Map of Site of Old Huguenot Goose Creek Church. facing 28 

Sketch of Lt. Col. David duBose Gaillard 39-42 

Treasurer's Statement 1912-1913 8 

Treasurer's Statement 1913-1914 17 



56 TRANSACTIONS 

Transactions No. 11 — Continued 

Some wills of South Carolina Huguenots; copies in original French, with trans- 
lations in English; with comments by Rev. Robert Wilson, D.D. Con- 
tinued from No. 10. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 
Transactions No. 12. Published in 1905. 

Minutes of the Twentieth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held 
April 13, 1905. 

List of officers. 

Report of officers. 

The President's Anniversary Address. 

Huguenot Immigration in South Carolina by Henry A. DeSaussure, Esq. 

A Short Story of Three Brothers, by Ida H. Layard. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 
Transactions No. 13. Published in 1906. 

Minutes of the Twenty-first Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held 
April 20, 1906. 

List of officers. 

Report of officers. 

Anniversary Address of President. 

The French Protestant Church, Paper read by Miss Ravcnel. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

Upper Beat of St. John's, Berkley, by late Prof. F. A. Porcher. 

Antoine Gabeau, by Miss Willis. 

Additional Data on Cordes Family. Maj. J. j. Lucas and D. E. Huger Smith, 
Esq. 

Old Document on Bruneau Family. Mr. A. S. Salley, jr. 

Notes from Crottet MSS. 
Transactions No. 14. Published in 1907. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of Twenty-second Anniversary Meeting. 

Report of officers. 

The President's Address. 

Huguenots on Santee River, by the late Henry A. DeSaussure. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots, Editorial Notes. 

Dr. J. L. E. W. Shecut, Miss Eola Willis. 

Ribault's F'ort, Miss Isabelle DeSaussure. 

Notes on Gaillard Family. 

Letter from Benj. Mazyek to Capt. Daniel Ravenel, dated June 28, 1776. 

List of members. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 
Transactions No. 15. Published in 1908. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of the Twenty- third Anniversary Meeting. 

Treasurer's Statement. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 57 

Transactions No. 15 — Continued 

Report of Historian. 

The President's Anniversary Address. 

Poem. The Bretons. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

Editorial Notes. 

Notice of Rteni Ravenel, Immigrant. 

The Last of the Huguenots. Stephen Thomas. 

The Isle of Oleron. M. M. de Richmond and M. Paul Thomas. 

List of members, revised. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 
Transactions No. id. Published in 1909. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of Twenty-fourth Anniversary Meeting. 

Reports of officers. 

The President's Anniversary Address. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

The State of French Protestants after 1685. 

Correspondence relative to gift to Society of site of Old Goose Creek French 
Church. 

Plats showing site of old Goose Creek French Church. 

The French Huguenot Church of the Parish of St. James, Goose Creek. 

List of members, revised. 
Transactions No. 17. Published in 1910. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of Twenty-fifth Anniversary Meeting. 

Reports of officers. 

The President's Annual Address. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

The Huguenots in America. By Lion. A. T. Clearwater. 

Notes on Theodore Sompayrac. 

Letter concerning Rev. Mons. Pouderous. 

Huguenot Lineage of Erroll H. Cplcock. 

Book Notices: "Les Freres Gibert." The Journal of American History, Vol. 
XIX, No. Ill, 3d Quarter. 

List of members. 
Transactions No. 18. Published in 1911. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of Twenty-sixth Anniversary Meeting. 

Reports of officers. 

The President's Anniversary Address. 

Account of Porcher Family, by Mrs. Wickham. 

Book Notices — La Reforme dans LTsle D'Oleron, Par Paul Thomas, Capaci- 
taire en Droit. Ouvrage Orne de onze illustrations. Lezay. Imprimerie- 
Libraire II. Canon. 1911. 
Transactions No. 19. Published in 1912. 

List of officers. 



58 TRANSACTIONS 

Transactions No. 19 — Continued 

Minutes of the Twenty-seventh Anniversary Meeting. 

Reports of officers. 

The President's Anniversary Address. 

The French Protestants of Abbeville, S. C, 1761-1765. 

List of South Carolina names in the registers of the French Churches in Kng- 

land. 
An address on Huguenots in America. 
Revised list of members of the Society. 

All members in good standing receive the Transactions from 
the date of' their membership without charge. 

Price: Copies of back numbers of the Transactions, except 
Numbers One, Three, Four, Seven, Eight, Thirteen, Seventeen, 
Eighteen and Nineteen, will be mailed to members of the 
Society on receipt of 50 cents. To other than members the 
price is 75 cents each, post paid. 

Address communications to Daniel Ravenel, Secretary, 93 
Meeting Street, Charleston, S. C. 



TRANSACTIONS 

OF THE 

Huguenot Society 



OF 



South Carolina 



No. 21 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY 




(INCORPORATED JUNE 21, 1909) 



CHARLESTON, S. C. 
1915 






NOTES 

The Huguenot Society is not local in its scope, its member- 
ship including persons of approved Huguenot descent from all 
parts of the world. 

Every member is urged to use the application in the back of 
this book, and secure for the Society a new member. 



Certificates of Membership will be mailed to members immedi- 
ately after their election. 



The Society Pins or Badges may be obtained by members 
from the Secretary, postage free, at the rate of $2.00 for those 
enameled on silver, or $4.00 for those enameled on gold. The 
pin represents the Seal of the Society and is about the size of a 
quarter of a dollar. 



Owing to the large increase in membership in the past two or 
three years and the demand from libraries in various parts of the 
world several numbers of the " Transactions" of the Society have 
become exhausted, and we are anxious to obtain copies of the 
following numbers 1, 3, 4, 7, 8, 13, 17, 18, 19. 

The Society would appreciate gifts of any of these numbers. 



Members of the Society are earnestly requested to notify the 
Secretary of change in residence and post office address , and change 
of name by marriage— also, of any deaths of members, which may 
come to their knowledge. 



OFFICERS 1915-1916 

President 
THOMAS W. BACOT 

Vice-Presidents 

For Charleston— WM. C. MILLER 
For Purysburg— DAVID HUGUENIN 
For New Bordeaux— CHAS. P. ALLSTON 

Secretary and Treasurer 
DANIEL RAVENEL 

Historian 
WM. G. MAZYCK 

Executive Committee 

DR. T. GRANGE SIMONS 
C. J. COLCOCK 
C. BISSELL JENKINS 
ALFRED HUGER 
SAMUEL G. STONEY 

The President, Vice-Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer, and Historian 
are ex officio members of the Executive Committee-— and all ex-Presidents 
are advisory members. 



5 -0/6 



MINUTES 

Charleston, S. C, April 13, 1915. 

The Thirtieth Anniversary Meeting of the Huguenot Society 
of South Carolina was held at the hall of the South Carolina 
Society, this afternoon, at 5 o'clock. 

The minutes of the Twenty-ninth Anniversary Meeting were 
read. A motion was made by Mr. M. deLisle Haig to amend 
these minutes. On motion, Air. Haig's resolution was tabled 
and the minutes were confirmed. 

The address of the President and the annual reports of the 
Executive Committee and the Treasurer and the Historian were 
read and ordered spread upon the minutes. 

The Secretary read a letter from Mrs. Edward Willis in 
which she presented to the Society a number of valuable books 
from the library of her late husband. The Secretary was in- 
structed to express the unanimous thanks of the Society to Mrs. 
Willis. 

The following applicants for membership in the Society, 
having been favorably reported on by the Executive Committee, 
were unanimously elected members: 

Bagnell, Robert Adams St. Louis, Mo. 

Bostick, Smith Molt Syracuse, N. Y. 

Charles, Miss Enielie Leslie. .... Darlington, S. C. 

Culbertson, Mrs. William S Louisville, Ky. 

dimming, Miss Anne Baeot Wilmington, N. C. 

Delafield, Mrs. Wallace St. Louis, Mo. 

DeSaussure, Dr. Richard 1 Washington, I). C. 

Doerzbach, Mrs. Belle Rodgers Sandusky, Ohio 

Dudley, Mrs. Juliette L Philadelphia, La. 

Gibert, Alexander Hamilton , Graniteville, S. C. 

Gibert, Alexander Hunter Graniteville, S. C. 

Harrison, Miss Adelina St. Louis, Mo. 

Ilarris-Beall, Mrs. Virginia Overton Cincinnati, Ohio 

Heard, Mrs. Silas Wright St. Louis, Mo. 

Hollister, Mrs. Charles B St. Louis, Mo. 

Jay, John B Charleston, S. C. 

Keith, Mrs. Willis Wilkinson Charleston, S. C. 

6 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA / 

LaBruce, Alfred T Charleston, S. C. 

LaBruce, Miss Emily II . . Charleston, S. C. 

Lucas, Mrs. James Hunt St. Louis, Mo. 

Meriwether, Miss Heunie Luting, Texas 

Michel, Henry Lafayette Ulanta, Ga 

Porcher, Miss Anne Allston Charleston, S. C. 

Porcher, J. Faber Charleston, S. C. 

Porcher, Dr. Walter Peyre Charleston, S. C. 

Quisenberry, Anderson C Hyattsville, Md. 

Read, M. Alston Charleston, S. C. 

Seabrook, Mrs. Elizabeth II Bennettsville, S. C. 

Sternberg, Mrs. Harriet Elizabeth Reading, Pa. 

Thomas, Claude Charleston, S. C. 

Wilkinson, Mrs. Earnest Washington, D. C. 

The following motion was offered by Mr. M. deLisle Ilaig: 
Resolved, That "Our distinguished and honored fellow mem- 
ber — Major Theodore G. Barker — who has been an active mem- 
ber of this Society for twenty-five years, having joined it in the 
spring of 1890, and who for the past fourteen years has served 
as a valued member of our Executive Committee, but now, 
feeling the weight of advancing age, has asked that his name 
be withdrawn and he be excused from serving longer on that 
Committee. 

Now, in order that the members of this Society might express 
their love and esteem for him and their appreciation of his 
long service for them, we hereby elect him an Honorary Member 
of this Society." Being duly seconded, this motion was unani- 
mously adopted by a rising vote. 

The following resolution was ottered and unanimously adopted : 
Resolved: That a committee of three be appointed to confer 
with the Trustees of the Charleston Library Society in order to 
ascertain if the Society could allow us space for the accommo- 
dation of the books belonging to the Huguenot Society, and that 
the said committee be empowered, in the event of the grant of 
such permission, to undertake the arrangement of the necessary 
shelving and to conclude such terms as may be exacted by the 
Charleston Library Society. 

The President named W. C. Miller, Geo. S. Holmes, and Wm. 
G. Mazyck, to serve on the Committee. 



8 TRANSACTIONS 

Several letters from Dr. A. II. Hirsch were read by the Presi- 
dent, in which he asked that the Huguenot Society of South 
Carolina take action regarding the sale of his "History of the 
Huguenots in South Carolina." On motion this matter was 
referred to the Executive Committee, with power to. act. 

The Secretary read a letter from the California Genealogical 
Society, requesting that the Huguenot Society of South Caro- 
lina send delegates to the International Congress of Genealogy, 
to be held in San Francisco the week beginning July 26th. He 
requested that should any member of the Society be in San Fran- 
cisco at that time that they secure the necessary credentials and 
attend the Congress. 

On motion of Mr. John B. Reeves it was decided to postpone, 
until the next meeting, action on the proposed amendments of 
the Constitution and By-laws. 

The President appointed Messrs. Geo. S. Holmes, J. R. P. 
Ravenel and Theodore Willis a committee to nominate officers for 
the ensuing year. The Committee nominated the following: 

President: Thos. W. Bacot. 

Vice-President for Charleston: Win. C. Miller. 

Vice-President for Purysburg: David Huguenin. 

Vice-President for New Bordeaux: Chas. Petigru Allston. 

Secretary and Treasurer: Daniel Ravenel. 

Historian: Wm. G. Mazyck. 

Executive* Committee: Dr. T. Grange Simons, C. J. Colcock, 
C. Bissell Jenkins, Alfred Huger, Samuel G. Stoney. 

On motion the nominees were unanimously elected. 

The President presented Dr. Yates Snowden, of the Univer- 
sity of South Carolina, a member of the Society. Dr. Snowden 
delivered a most interesting address, at the closing of which he 
was requested to give the Society the manuscript, in order that 
the address may be published in the forthcoming number of the 
Transactions. 

There being no further business the meeting adjourned. 

After the meeting a collation was served. 

Daniel Ravenel, Secretary and Treasurer. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 9 

THE PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

Ladies and Gentlemen: 

The Thirtieth Anniversary of our Society finds us in prosperous 
state, which is in large measure to be credited to our most 
efficient Secretary and Treasurer (Mr. Daniel Ravenel). 

The number of our members now is in the neighborhood of 
450, a majority pi whom are of many of the States other than 
South Carolina, a few being of foreign countries. 

It has been my hope and expectation to be able to report at 
this Anniversary Meeting the exact location of the sites of the 
old French Protestant or Huguenot Churches in the Orange 
Quarter and St. John's, Berkley, but the condition of country 
roads consequent upon excessive rains has prevented consumma- 
tion of plans to locate such sites — the location of the Church 
sites in French Santee and Purysburg and New Bordeaux are 
reasonably certain — and I do trust that by our next Anniversary 
all of them may have been definitely ascertained to the end 
that in due time each of them may be marked with an enduring 
monument as already has been done in the case of the Goose 
Creek site, and that an anniversary or other meeting of the So- 
ciety may sometime be likewise had at each of them. 

Let me mention another matter which will be of interest to 
you: 

I have recently written to Mr. Bonsai, of the Carolina, Atlan- 
tic & Western Railway, through Mr. Henry Buist, suggesting 
that as a matter of history the proposed new station of the rail- 
way on the south of and next to the Santee River be named 
" Jamestown," as the site of old Jamestown of "French Santee" 
is very near the place where the Railway crosses the river — 
Mr. Buist informs me that Mr. Bonsai has received the sugges- 
tion enthusiastically and that it will probably be adopted. 

I bespeak for the Society a prosperous and useful career. 



10 TRANSACTIONS 

REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The Executive Committee reports as follows: 

Transactions No. 20 have been issued, and a copy has been 
sent to every member of the Society. The Committee hopes 
that the lapse of time between the issuance of No. 20 and No. 
21 will not be as great as was that between No. 19 and No. 20. 

In accordance with a letter received from Mr. D. G. Dwight, 
requesting 'the Society to take some action in regard to having 
the name "Culebra Cut," Panama Isthmian Canal, changed to 
"Gaillard Cut/' in honor of and in justice to the late Col. David 
duBose Gaillard, the engineer in charge of the digging of that 
Cut, the President, under the direction of the Committee, wrote 
to President Wilson on the subject. 

The Memorial Tablet to Col. David duBose Gaillard has been 
erected in the Huguenot Church, Charleston, S. C, by the 
Huguenot Church Aid Society and this Society — a print of 
this Tablet appears in Transactions No. 20. 

The Committee is very glad to report no resignations for the 
past year — and favorably reports the following thirty-one 
applicants for membership : 

Bagnell, Robert Adams St. Louis, Mo. 

Bostick, Smith Molt Syracuse, N. Y. 

Charles, Miss Emelie Leslie Darlington, S. C. 

Culbertson, Mrs. William S Louisville, Ky. 

Cumming, Miss Anne Bacot Wilmington, N. C. 

Delafield, Mrs. Wallace St. Louis, Mo. 

DeSaussure, Dr. Richard L Washington, D. C. 

Doerzbach, Mrs. Belle Rodgers Sandusky, Ohio 

Dudley, Mrs. Juliette L .Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gibert, Alexander Hamilton Graniteville, S. C. 

Gibert, Alexander Hunter Graniteville, S. C. 

Harrison, Miss Adeline St. Louis, Mo. 

Harris-Beall, Mrs. Virginia Overton Cincinnati, Ohio 

Heard, Mrs. Silas Wright St. Louis, Mo. 

Hollister, Mrs. Charles B. St. Louis, Mo. 

Jay, John B Charleston, S. C. 

Keith, Mrs. Willis Wilkinson Charleston, S. C. 

LaBruce, Alfred T Charleston, S. C. 

LaBruce, Miss Emily II Charleston, S. C. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 11 

Lucas, Mrs. James Hunt St. Louis, Mo. 

Meriwether, Miss Ilennie Luting, Texas 

Michel, Henry Lafayette Atlanta, (Ja. 

Porclier, Miss Anne Allston Charleston, S. C. 

Porcher, j. Faber Charleston, S. C. 

Porcher, Dr. Walter Peyre Charleston, S. C. 

Quisenberry, Anderson C Hyattsville, Md. 

Read, M. Alston Charleston, S. C. 

Seabrook, Mrs. Elizabeth H Bennettsville, S. C. 

Sternberg, Mrs. Harriet Elizabeth. Reading, Pa. 

Thomas, Claude. '. Charleston, S. C. 

Wilkinson, Mrs. Earnest Washington, D. C. 

On the other hand the Committee is grieved to report the 
deaths during the past year of the following members: 

Arthur Mazyck, who was identified with the Soeiety from its 
inception, and who was elected last year as Vice-President for 
Charleston. 

Philip P. Mazyck. 

Isaac Mazyck, a Charter Member. 

Maj. J. J. Lucas. 

Mrs. C. L. C. Berry man. 

Mrs. M. G. DeSaussure, a Charter Member as well as an 
Honorary Member and also the oldest member of the 
Society. 

Mrs. A. A. VanderHorst. 

The matter of a place for the Society's growing library is a 
vexed question which the Committee brings to the attention of 
the Society for its action thereon. 

Another matter of great interest to the Society is the forth- 
coming work on "The Huguenots of South Carolina," by Mr. 
Arthur H. Hirsch, of Collegeville, Pa., who was elected last 
year a member of the Society — this work is exhaustive and 
shows great research — the Macmillan Company, which is to pub- 
lish it, pronounce it u an excellent piece of work," and the Pro- 
fessors of the University of Chicago are said to be "enthusiastic 
over it." Mr. Hirsch has written to ask that the Society under- 
take to aid him in the sale of the work, and the Society should 
take some action thereon. 



12 TRANSACTIONS 

The following amendments to the Constitution and By-Laws 
having been adopted by a vote of a majority of all the members 
of the Executive Committee at a recent meeting of the Committee 
during the recess of the Society, they must be confirmed at this 
meeting of the Society under the provisions of Section 8 of the 
By-Laws : 

Article III, Section 6, of the Constitution:— Strike out the 
clause reading "If their report be favorable, the candidate shall 
be considered , duly elected; but if demanded, the election shall 
be by ballot, and a two-thirds vote of the members present 
shall be necessary to elect" — and in lieu thereof insert the 
following: "If the Committee's report be favorable to any 
applicants, a majority vote of the members present shall be 
required to elect such applicants: but, if the Committee's report 
be unfavorable to any applicants, such unfavorable report 
shall be considered as confirmed without a vote of the Society, 
unless three members object, in which case a vote by ballot 
shall be taken for each of such applicants separately and a two- 
thirds vote of the members present shall be required to reject 
such unfavorable report and to elect such applicant. Member- 
ship shall begin with the Anniversary Meeting (April 13) at 
which the applicant may be elected, or (if elected at a meet- 
ing other than an Anniversary Meeting) then with the Anni- 
versary Meeting next after such other meeting." 

By-Laws — Section 6: — Strike out the whole of said Section 6 
and in lieu thereof insert the following: "It shall be the duty of 
the Secretary, in addition to his other duties, to keep a list of the 
members by card or otherwise, and on such list to write after 
the name of each member the name or names of the Huguenots 
through whom he or she claims descent, under Subdivision 
"Firstly" of Section 1, Article III of the Constitution, as shown 
by his or her written application for membership — or else his or 
her qualification for membership otherwise than by descent, 
under Subdivisions " Secondly" and "Thirdly" and "Fourthly" 
of Section 1, Article III, of the Constitution." 

T. W. Bacot, President, Chairman of Executive Committee. 

April 13, 1915. 



I 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 13 

STATEMENT 

of 
Daniel Ravencl, Treasurer, for the year ending April 13, 1915 

Receipts 
1914 
April 13 

To balance from last year $446 . 93 

To members dues April 13, 1914 to April 13, 1915 325 . 10 

To sale of Transactions 15 .70 

To sale of badges 40.21 

To interest on permanent fund for year 17.76 



$845.70 

Disbursements 
1914 
April 13 

By paid collation at Anniversary Meeting $31 .00 

By paid postage 37 . 35 

By paid on % printing Transactions No. 20 '....' 100.00 

By paid "The News and Courier" for advertising 4.90 

By paid Society Pins 37 . 50 

By paid flowers to funerals of deceased members 2 .00 

By paid Transactions bought .65 

By paid expenses of Annual Meeting 1914 at Ladson, S. C 40.35 

By paid copying ms. for Transactions No. 20 3.12 

By paid printing and stationery 24.20 

By paid Huguenot Aid Society donation to monument in Huguenot 

Church to memory of Col. David Gaillard 25.00 

By paid President's dues to Huguenot Soc. of London 5 30 

By paid commission to Treasurer on $398.78 collected 39.87 

By paid exchange on checks .65 

$351.89 
Balance 

Permanent fund $455.67 

General Fund 38. 14 

$493.81 

$493.81 

$845.70 



14 TRANSACTIONS 

REPORT OF HISTORIAN 

List of pamphlets, magazines and other periodicals received 
during the past year from societies and individuals for the 
Huguenot Society of South Carolina: 

Proceedings of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin. 

Some Important Colonial Military Operations, by Frederic 
Louis Huidekoper. 

The Western Reserve Historical Society Tract, no. 93. 

The John Bogart Letters, 1776-1782, Rutgers College Publi- 
cations. 

Library Publications, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

Reuben Gold Thwaites, by Frederick Jackson Turner. 

Antikvarisk Tidskrift for Sverige, from Stockholm, Sweden. 

Bowdoin College Bulletin, April, May, February and Decem- 
ber, 1914. 

James Sprunt Historical Publications, from University of 
North Carolina. 

Proceedings of the New York State Historical Association, 
1913. 

South Carolina Historical Society Magazine, April, July and 
October, 1914. 

Twenty-one volumes of The Washington Historical Quarterly, 
Seattle, Wash. 

Kungl Yitterhets Historie Och Antikvitetsakademien, Stock- 
holm, Sweden. 

Address given by Harry E. Brittain, Esq., to Royal Colonial 
Institute. 

Life of Nathan Hale, from Yale University, New Haven, 
Conn. 

Schenectady County Historical Society, 1913-1914. 

Missouri Historical Review, July, 1914, and January, 1915. 

Annals of Iowa, April, July, 1914, and January, 1915. 

Proceedings of the Huguenot Society of London, vol. x, no. 3. 

The publications of The Huguenot Society of London, vol. 
xxii. 1914. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



15 



About 50 volumes from The Royal Colonial Institute, London, 

Engand. 

Diary of Nelson Kingsley, a California Argonaut of 1849, by 
University of California, December, 1914. 

The Pennsylvania Magazine, Historical Society of Pennsyl- 
vania, October, July, 1914, and January, 1915. 

Fornvannen, 1913. 

The Huguenot Society of London, By-Laws and List of 
Fellows, 1914. ' 

Louisiana State Museum, Fourth Biennial Report. 

United Empire, July, 1914. 

Publications from Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D. C. 

Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. 

Tale of the Huguenots. 

The Huguenots, vol. i 

The Huguenots, vol. ii 

Selections from Fenelon. 

Pursuit of Holiness, Gouldurn. 

Histoire Despagne. 

Entire Devotion, Mrs. P. Palmer. 

Words and Mind of Jesus, Rev. J. R. 
MacDuff, D.D. 

Oeuvres de Montesquieu 

The Huguenots, by Samuel Smiles. 

Cross and Crown, Jas. D. McCabe, Jr. 

Transactions of Huguenot Society of South 
Carolina, 15, 17, 18, and 19. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. G. Mazyck, Historian, 

April 13, 1915. 



Gift of Mrs. 

Edward Willis, 

Charleston, S. C. 



1 6 TRANSACTIONS 

THE PLANTERS OF ST. JOHN'S 

Remarks of Professor Yates Snowden, of the University 

of South Carolina and a Member of the Huguenot 

Society of South Carolina, at the Anniversary 

Meeting of the Society on April 13'ih, 1915 

What I have to say, or largely to read, this afternoon relate: 
mainly to village life in two Parishes in South Carolina, whicl 
for many years retained the characteristics we associate with tin 
early Huguenot emigrants to this State. If your patience be no 
exhausted, I shall close with a brief character sketch of a rep 
resentative Huguenot of Charleston nearly two generation: 
ago — a man whom some of you knew well, though none of yoi 
honor his memory more than I do. 

In his admirable address before this Society in 1894, the lat< 
Dr. Gabriel E. Manigault, referring to the various Hugueno 
Settlements in this State, remarked that all of them with om 
exception had been, to a large degree, Anglicised; or, if you will 
"Americanized." With many of the refugees, especially ii 
Charleston, he thinks that, the first impulse, "the stronges 
desire was to forget France and the terrible treatment the} 
had received there" * * * and that in Charleston "then 
was no appreciable difference between the children of tin 
refugees and the citizens of English descent." 

In Dr. Manigault* s opinion, "St. John's Berkeley, the birth 
place of Francis Marion, remained the only exclusively Frencl 
settlement," and he claims that "the thrift and good husbandr) 
of the refugee Huguenots remained a feature of this last settle 
ment for over 100 years!" 

One may take issue with that eminent scholar as to the earl) 
and almost complete amalgamation of the French with the 
English and other peoples in this State, but no one familiar with 
the planters of St. John's Berkeley and the adjoining Parish 
of St. Stephen's, peopled by Huguenots to almost an equal de- 
gree, can doubt that there was retained longer than in any 
part of our State the simplicity of manners and elevation oj 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 17 

character and abundant and elegant hospitality of the French 
Huguenot, and that time and intermarriage with other stocks 
has not yet utterly blotted out the dark flashing eyes, the 
swarth nervous faces, the slight wiry figures inherited from 
Isaac Porcher from Berri and Touraine; Pierre Gaillard from 
Poitou; DuBose from Languedoc; Ravenel, from Bretagne; or 
Gourdin from Artois. 

By some lucky chance I copied, years ago, extracts from let- 
ters written 1803-1806 by Samuel DuBose at Pineville to his 
brother William DuBose, a school boy at Newport and after- 
ward a student at Yale. Born in 1784 in St. Stephen's Parish, 
Samuel DuBose had early been sent to Mr. Rogers's school in 
Newport, R. I., and his letters show how close had been his ob- 
servation of the New England character. These intimate 
letters disclose a beautiful type of character, and by common 
consent his neighbors, relatives and slaves held him up as a 
model man during his long life of 75 years. I make no excuse 
for reading those extracts, grave, gay, lively, or severe. 

On November 3, 1805, he writes : " I know not William, whether 
I am an enthusiast, but I declare myself swelled in the opinion 
that of the different quarters of the globe America is the hap- 
piest, of the different quarters of America Carolina is the hap- 
piest, and that Pineville is the most so of any spot in South 
Carolina." 

You may smile at such parochialism, but it is equalled 
by Emerson's frequent tributes to Concord, and Emerson, 
provincial to the core, is generally considered the greatest of 
American writers. 

Samuel DuBose, the native, was not singular in his admira- 
tion of Pineville. John C. Calhoun in October 1807, in a letter 
to the lady whose daughter he was to marry, said: " At Pineville, 
I spent two days. I had the pleasure of meeting a * * * 
number of acquaintances which made my stay delightful. I 
never was in a place where there was more apparent equality 
and friendship among the inhabitants than in that." 

Such intense home love is found in all civilized countries, par- 



18 TRANSACTIONS 

ticularly among the French. In "Gerfaut," a novel written be- 
fore the Franco-Prussian War, Charles de Bernard represents 
an Alsatian shepherd as saying: "I am not French; I am Alsa- 
dan"— trait de patriotisme de docker assez commun dans la belle 
province da Rhein" adds the author, "little dreaming," says Dr. 
Basil Gildersleeve, "of the national significance of that 'patriot- 
isme de docker. 7 " 

Riding through the Moloja Pass from Switzerland to Italy, 
eight years' ago, I saw this legend in large letters upon a brick 
farm house: Ille terrarum mihi praeler omnis angulus ridet. 
"What's that," I asked my scholarly companion, Bishop North- 
rop, and he replied, "Why don't you recognize the lines from 
Horace, 'This little corner smiles upon me more than all the 
world?' " 

In June 1806, Mr. DuBose writes: "Old age it appears to me 
must now very soon take old Saby from this mortal state; al- 
though hearty, it is making daily ravages, which are too visible. 
What a spectacle is he William, for a contemplative reasonable 
mind to survey! It is more than volumes. Time, which has 
caused so vast a resolution externally, has not affected his facul- 
ties very materially — that wondtrful activity of mind he stih 
possesses, and all that industry in attending his little crop he 
still exercises. He stands up, as it were, and sees generations 
rise and fall; he looks around at the spot where he is shortly to 
be laid; he sees the dust he's shortly to be mingled with; he re- 
jects, and the reflection causes a smile! Happy old man; 
blessed religion! What had he been without you! Sometimes, 
conversing with him, he tells me he is now ready to die — after a 
pause, 'No!' says he; 'I am not ready, but with God's grace, 
will be when once (more) I can see and talk with Mas' Billy,' 
as he still calls you. However, I have my doubts whether or 
not he shall ever see you." 

Until you reach the closing lines and "Mas' Billy," you 
imagine that the young planter is writing of some impoverished 
friend or poor relation, whom the DuBoses had befriended. 

The style may appear stilted or sententious to the hyper- 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 19 

critical; but it comes straight from the heart and rings true. 
It has given me infinite pleasure to read that extract to several 
fair minded Northern friends as proof that the slave holder of 
South Carolina was not always a brute, and that "Saby" the 
negro slave was an infinitely happier and better man on Blue fort 
Plantation, that he would have been had he remained in hib 
African jungle — Whittier, Longfellow and Harriet Beecher 
Stowe to the contrary notwithstanding. 

These letters generally picture a condition of " sweet tran- 
quility and unapproachable serenity" that normally character- 
ized many slave holding communities of the Old South; but I 
would not have you believe that Samuel DuBose was the type 
of all the planters of St. John's or St. Stephen's or that every- 
thing was idyllic thereabout. 

Here is an extract (July, 1806), that needs no explanation: 

" , I am sorry to say, had given himself up for 

several years to every excess and extravagance; he was more 
than half of his time drunk; he did no business, spent a great 
deal of money for his father, already distressed in circumstances. 
He always had a pair of pistols in his room for the purpose of 
making way with himself. After three or four years course of 
life such as this, he died miserably, and I believe at his death 
the only regret was that he had lived so long. Such was the end 
of a young man who might have been an ornament to his country 
and a comfort to his relations." 

The name I leave blank is that of one of the most eminent 
Huguenot families in the State, then and now. 

I doubt if any of the DuBose family, even if he or she be a 
descendant of that noble gentleman and be present in this room, 
will object to my reading Samuel DuBose's announcement, 
nearly 108 years ago, of his engagement, and of his views as to 
choosing a bride. He writes: 

"In making a choice of a wife I have had in view one grand 
consideration (in my opinion), to get one whose circumstances 
and views in life were as near mine as possible, and in this I 
think I have succeeded. If we will have our fortune to make, 



20 TRANSACTIONS 

'tis nothing when we have the disposition to do so. I would 

ask what expectations of happiness can a man have who marries 
a woman of high notions when he knows his circumstances for- 
bid a probability of one of them being indulged in; and, on the 
contrary, what has been called marrying a fortune, I have 
thought of. I find few calculated for entering the list of fortune 
hunters; there are so many essentials requisite for forming such 
a character, ancj, after all, what do you get? A fortune often, 
without a woman, and seldom happiness! Thus the very step, 
taken for the possession of this inestimable (boon?) is that which 

throws it at a distance from one! But, enough, 

is the lady I am to take for a wife. I flatter myself she will 
prove to me a Prize!" (With a capital "P!"). "We must do 
our part, and leave the rest to that Providence who holds the 
destinies of us all in his hands!" 

"All the world loves a lover," says Emerson, and you will 
enjoy the conservative views on the choice of a wife by a youth, 
just turned twenty-three. There is philosophic calm and poise 
in the exordium; but in the peroration, so to speak, he refers 
to 'doing our part,' and leaving the rest to Providence, in a vein 
of pathetic resignation, which Mrs. Pankhurst's husband would 
have emulated, in these piping times of impending Women's 
Suffrage ! 

In April, 1806, Mr. DuBose writes: "I should like to hear 
how you all go in College (Yale). I hope you are not as rebel- 
lious a set as we have in the South Carolina College; only twice 
since the New Year have those blades of metal thought proper 
to behave themselves in a seditious and turbulant manner unbe- 
coming lads receiving their education. At the head of these I 
am informed were C. Stevens and James Gaillard. I did not 
hear anything relative to T. Palmer and T. Gaillard in this 
affair, but from my knowledge of them I am led to suspect they 
had a finger in the Pye(5/V)." 

This is only one of four or five references to Pineville youth 
away at school or college. In July, 1803, he reports that two 
Gaillards, a Stevens and a Gourdin have gone to school at 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 21 

Baskenridge "a place in New Jersey." Apropos of the Emeutes 
of students at South Carolina College, it is interesting to read 
this extract from a letter of September the same year: 

"I am happy to find by your last that the riot which took 
place among you is like to terminate so favorably to you. I 
hardly ever was more surprised than when I read your letter, 
for I thought of all places New Haven would have been the 
last to have witnessed such a scene among its citizens. It is a 
thousand to one if such a thing would take place once in fifty 
years in Charleston, and yet what different characters are given 
of the two places." 

You have had some true side lights on Mr. DuBose as a 
master of slaves; as an earnest devout Christian gentleman; as 
a philosophic lover and prospective husband. The last extract 
I shall make is from a long letter on political conditions in Con- 
necticut, and a critical but very friendly and fair estimate of the 
New England character. The date is uncertain, I regret to say. 
Mr. DuBose writes: 

"The local situation (of Connecticut) is admirable, and the 
republican government under which her citizens have experienced 
so many blessings for nearly a century and a half could not fail 
of making her prosperous, and she has attained it. There 
learning is disseminated through every order of her citizens 
and her sons are enlightened, the happy effects of a government 
founded on republican principles. Connecticut in a peculiar 
degree favors these principles and it behooves her to cherish and 
foster them, in fine I think they are more congenial to her 
manners than to most of her sister States of the Union. I 
take it that there are many less overgrown estates and purse- 
proud families in Connecticut than in any, at any rate, most 
of the States which have slaves, and those States which have 
very large commercial towns which monopolize all trade. In 
such there are generally a large proportion of foreigners, many 
of whom, it cannot be expected, are much attached to the glorious 
principles of our Revolution, although partaking, in common 
with us, of them. * * * When, therefore, I have seen par- 



22 TRANSACTIONS 

ticular individuals of vast possessions, individuals ambitious 
and of superior talents and abilities; others, founding their 
pride only in proportion to what their ancestors for ages back 
have been; I say, when I have seen both talents and property 
in the possession of a few, and that few tainted with aristocratic 
ideas — where has been the difficulty of accounting for this? 
But, when we see Connecticut as a State throwing from her the 
only political principles which her citizens ought to possess, and 
assuming the 'garb of aristocracy, it is truly unaccountable! 
* * * * My dear Brother, I agree with you, I admire their 
religious habits. I love their industry; but, depend upon it, 
those very people brought into South Carolina would be guilty 
of that which they attempt to despise in the Carolinians; they 
raise a huzza about our possessing slaves; / do not mean to say it 
is right, but, that it is necessary! Soil and climate have made it 
so; and I am firmly convinced * * * that, if it was their 
interest to have such property tomorrow, and they could, the)' 
would! Those who know them best must know that they are 
not very remarkable for sacrificing their interest to strict jus- 
tice. You say in your letter you ' don't believe there is a people 
more on an equality with each other than those of Connecticut;' 
so far as respects education and property, my brother, I agree 
with you. For this very reason it is the more astonishing to 
me that she should not only be so much opposed to our gov- 
ernment and the present administration; but, to show, of late, 
so intolerant a spirit oi political as well as religious per- 
secution! * * * You say you are but a silent spectator of 
all this; but, I think and hope you are disgusted with such 
conduct and that you will be a more decided Republican than 
ever you were. You can never be one too soon!" 

I doubt if many in this audience appreciate the real signifi- 
cance of that letter. The Huguenots were, not individually, 
but as a class, the main slave owners in South Carolina; slave 
owners were, by common consent, the 'aristocracy/ or 'Slave- 
Barons/ — in the language of a later day. The leading men 
from South Carolina at that time were Federalists, the onlv 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 23 

notable exceptions being Charles Pinckneyand William Lowndes, 
and many regarded Charles Pinckney as a turncoat or dema- 
gogue. Samuel DuBose would naturally be expected to ally 
himself with his class, — and yet, he makes a bold plea for Dem- 
ocracy, and anathematizes Aristocracy! It would be interest- 
ing to me to pursue this subject further, for here we find a 
Huguenot, the owner of many slaves, and an 'aristocrat' by 
education and environment, protesting against 'aristocracy/ 
and lauding the erstwhile democracy of Connecticut. 

It is in St. John's Berkeley and the adjoining Parish of St. Ste- 
phen that a most interesting study might be made of slavery 
and slave holders in South Carolina, their virtues and their 
frailties. 

Dr. Gabriel Manigault, whom I quoted earlier, said of these 
St. John's planters: 

"As soon as slaves, brought from Africa, could be purchased 
by them, they continued to provide for all their wants on their 
plantations, long after the false system of making the cotton 
crop buy the provisions had been inaugurated elsewhere. Even 
the use of the hand-loom for clothing had been continued so 
long, that during the war of Secession there were enough old 
negroes on the various plantations, who understood its con- 
struction and working, for the industry to be resumed during the 
emergency of the blockade." 

None of the great "Slave Barons" of South Carolina before 
the War between the States, with the possible exception of the 
Manigaults, were Huguenots. Among the great slave-owners of 
the Sixties, Nathaniel Heyward, William Aiken, Wade Hampton, 
John L. Manning, Nicholas Peay, and others, there were no 
men of French blood, and yet, as a class the Huguenots of 1790 
and their descendants were the largest slave-owners in the South. 

W. S. Rossiter, the chief clerk of the United States census, 
in 1909 proved from a study of population growth in the United 
States (1790-1900), that the average number of slaves, per 
family, are largest for families of French origin. "This is ac- 
counted for by the fact that the total number of families of 



24 TRANSACTIONS 

obviously French origin, in the United States, was small, and 
that a large proportion of such families were located in South 
Carolina, the State in which the average number of slaves per 
family was highest. It is not surprising, therefore," says Mr. 
Rossiter, "that the French families led in the proportion which 
slaveholding families formed of total families, nearly one- third 
were slaveholders. " 

The relations between master and slave in St. John's and St. 
Stephen's were generally kindly for over 100 years. There were 
cruel slave owners as there are now cruel husbands — and cruel 
wives! — and cruel slave owners were despised by the commu- 
nity and were known of all men. With the negro race largely 
preponderant, naturally the laws bore harshly on the subject 
population. I would be the last to defend all legislation passed 
for the subjection of negro slaves — and yet I believe, and shall 
always contend, that in St. John's and St. Stephen's, there was a 
minimum of cruelty, and that the relations of master and slave 
were, on the whole, ideal for that time. I find in a letter 
from my own grandfather, dated "Pineville Oct. 20, 1823," some 
data that are significant. I would remind you that 1822 was the 
year of the celebrated Denmark-Vesey-Gullah Jack slave insur- 
rection, when Charleston and the plantations along Cooper River 
barely escaped a frightful massacre, which would, if successful, 
have rivaled the horrors of St. Domingo! The only echo of that 
attempted insurrection I have found in St. John's and St. 
Stephen's, is in this letter from the Rev. Charles B. Snowden to 
his brother in Charleston. "* * * The taking up of the 
crop required my presence at the plantation. I had also to go 
with the patrol into the swamp after the remnant of Joe's party, 
anc! then I had to spend two days attending the court pleading 
for one of the negroes." (He was a lawyer, before he became 
a clergyman !) * * * On Friday the 1 7th Strephon a slave of 
Dr. Ravenel's was executed near the Canal (Santee) bank, just 
at the foot of the bridge at Big Camp. He was one of the party 
which lately infested the neighborhood of the mouth of the 
Canal. He appeared under the fatal tree unappalled. He 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OE SOUTH CAROLINA 25 

acknowledged that his sentence was just; that he should have 
been glad if he could have been saved, but must submit to his 
fate with resignation and with no ill will towards any one. Ife 
professed * * * that he had never attempted the life of any 
person and had strenuously advised Joe in more instances than 
one not to commit murder. He knelt under the tree, and was 
engaged in silent prayer for some time, and was twined off almost 
inaudibly singing a hymn. The Court I believe, gave all due 
consideration to the circumstances of his case, and delayed the 
passage and execution of the sentence for several days. The 
rest of the party being women are to be dismissed, I believe, 
without punishment." Whether "Joe," the ringleader, was ever 
apprehended, and what his fate, I do not know. I do know 
that with the strongest incentives there was no general uprising 
of the slaves in St. John's and St. Stephen's, this side of what is 
now known as the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. You will 
pardon an extract from another letter from Charles Snowden 
to his brother in July, 1822, the preceding year, upon the receipt 
of the news of the Denmark- Vesey insurrection. He writes in 
philosophic and pessimistic vein, and doubtless gives the views 
of some intelligent planters of his class, and he ventures an ex- 
planation why slave insurrections are more unlikely in the coun- 
try than in the cities, which is interesting to students of the 
slavery regime. "We are henceforth," he writes, "to expect a 
great deal of such business. The progress of the light of knowl- 
edge is such, and the adaptation of man for liberty so constitu- 
tional that it will be impossible to keep the negroes utterly in the 
dark, and utterly tame under the necessary oppression which 
now weighs them down. It will be long, long indeed, before a 
completely successful effort will or can be made by them to 
throw off the yoke of bondage; but efforts and bloody ones, I 
am afraid, will be continually made until successs at last shall 
crown them. Reflection, the fruit of leisure, will have place 
with many black people in the city where hard labour for all 
cannot be found, and reflection will give rise to action, and action 
once begun will generate action. In the country we are in less 



26 TRANSACTIONS 

danger. Our negroes know that labor is essential to subsistence, 
and that they have nothing to expect at last but a change of 
masters, and that for the worse. Hence they will never be gen- 
erally brought into the scrape until it happens from necessity. 
On a late search for arms there was nothing found indicating 
anything like a state of hostile preparation." 

I happen to have a "Census of the inhabitants of Pineville," 
taken in August, 1826, giving the names and ages of all the white 
inhabitants Of the village that year, and a " Census of the vil- 
lage of Pineville" taken in 1832, — both of them unpublished. 
This last document is of special interest for it gives the names 
of all whites over 15; the number of blacks and their owners, 
the number of carriages, " chairs," horses, cows, and of news- 
papers and periodicals taken. The details would be tiresome, 
but the amazing grand totals of whites and blacks, are significant. 
Here are the heads 6f families, and you will note that the French 
element largely prevails, though many with English fathers had 
Huguenot mothers or wives: Bonneau, Cooper, Broughton, 
Calvit, Campbell, Cain, Cordes, Cantey, Couturier, Samuel 
DuBose, William DuBose, DeVeaux, P. Gaillard, James Gail- 
lard, Harriet Gaillard, Edwin Gaillard, David Gaillard, Mrs. 
Gourdin, Mazyck, S. McKelvey, Mrs. McKelvey, Joseph Palmer, 
Mrs. Marion, Thomas Porcher, F. A. Porcher, Charles Porcher, 
Dr. William Porcher, Sims Le Queux, John Ravenel, H. Ravenel, 
Charles Stevens, Mrs. Maria Snowden, John Thomas, Walter 
Thomas. 

The total population of Pineville in 1832, was 789; of which 
235 were white, 97 of them children, — and 554 were black! 
You must remember that over 75 per cent of this population was 
only there for the summer, taking refuge in the pinelands from 
the plantations on the Santee and thereabout, and that the 554 
negroes did not include the "gangs" left to cultivate the plan- 
tation. And not improbably there were several among these 
Pineville planters of 1832, who had a third establishment; a 
house in Charleston. Gaillard Hunt of Washington, the emi- 
nent litterateur and civilian, in his last work, "Life in America 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 27 

One Hundred Years Ago," says in his sketch of Charleston: 
"few families in this ("the ruling") circle had less than twenty 
household servants — ;" and I happen to know that Mr. Hunt, in 
that statement, in quoting from his Gaillard family annals. 
Can you find a more powerful economic object lesson against 
slavery than in those figures: 138 white adults and 97 white- 
children, and 554 blacks! — not beaten to death, but growing 
fat and sleek, and, in curt phrase, "eating their heads off" and 
practically doing nothing. A realization of the fact that such 
economic system was ruinous would have dawned upon the most 
benighted Southerner before Jong, even if Mr. Lincoln had not 
issued the Emancipation proclamation! Always remember: 
20 years from now no one will deny, "that Mr. Lincoln did not 
wage the war to free the slave! He freed the slave in order to 
wage the war!" 

I conclude this reference to slavery in St. John's and St. 
Stephen's, with the testimony of Prof. F. A. Poreher, one of the 
lot owners in Pineville in 1832. He wrote in 1868, after the 
war and emancipation proclamation, and at or about the time 
of the reconstruction measures of 1868: "I have lived in free 
States and in slave States, and I have never known a society 
which entertained a higher tone of honor, a more deeply rooted 
moral and religious principle; I have never known women of 
greater purity and delicacy of thought and feeling, men and 
women who exhibited greater propriety of conduct both in public 

and in private." 

* * * 

And now let me attempt, with the assistance of a Northern 
journalist, a pen picture of a representative Huguenot of 
Charleston. Come with me to the constitutional convention 
held in Columbia in 1865. The personnel of the convention 
was the highest type of brains and character and manhood 
which had survived the War. It was not until thirty years 
later, the Convention of 1895, that there was to be another 
such gathering. The task before them was well nigh impos- 
sible — to frame a constitution which should satisfactorily deal 



28 TRANSACTIONS 

with the many problems of the day — and even then the dark 
shadow of Reconstruction and Negro Suffrage impended. As 
you know, the constitution they framed was swept away by the 
convention of 1868 held in Charleston, called by Major General 
E. R. S. Canby, U. S. A., in accordance with an Act of Congress 
"to provide for the more efficient government of the rebel 
States." 

Here is an extract from a report sent to the "Boston Adver- 
tiser" and "Chicago Tribune" by their correspondent, Sidney 
Andrews, a republican of ability, but bitter and scathing in 
comment as a rule, and an avowed advocate of negro suffrage. 

"Mr. Alfred Huger of Charleston, seconded the motion for 
immediate action. He is over eighty years of age, is tall and not 
much bent, has a face indicative of great force and strength of 
character, and wears long white hair — the general appearance 
of his face reminding one of the pictures of Calhoun, whom the 
old man eulogized." 

I do not recall ever having seen Mr. Huger in my early youth, 
but I have frequently seen and admired what is said to be an 
admirable portrait of the old Roman. It has "strength of char- 
acter," but there is none of the severely plain, rugged force 
which you will note in every daguerreotype and portrait of Cal- 
houn— there is a sweetness and gentleness which is never seen 
in the face of Calhoun. Indeed, I have never seen another 
portrait, except Gen. R. E. Lee's, where more clearly "every 
God did seem to set his seal." 

To return to Andrews' report: "The noticeable feature of 
the speech was its language of devotion to South Carolina — " 
"She is my mother: I have all my life loved what she loved, 
and hated what she hated; everything she had I made my own, 
and every act of hers was my act; as I have had but one hope, 
to live with her, so now I have but one desire, to die on her soil 
and be laid iii her bosom. If I am wrong in everything else, I 
know I am right in loving South Carolina, — know I am right in 
believing that, whatever glory the future may bring our re- 
united country, it can neither brighten nor tarnish the glory of 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OE SOUTH CAROLINA 29 

South Carolina. She has passed through the agony and bloody 
sweat, and we now return her to the Federal Union — let every 
man do his duty bravely before the world, trustfully before God, 
remembering each man for himself that he is a South Carolinian. 
She has been devastated by the invader, reviled by the hire- 
ling, mocked by the weakhearted; but she has accepted the invi- 
tation to return — accepted it in good faith with the assurance 
of a word better than a bond; and now, no matter what she gives 
up, no matter what' there is to endure, and to forget, let us all 
do our duty as becomes her children, counting it our chieftest 
honor to stand by her in evil report as in good report, honor 
alike to live with her and to die with her!" 

Such sentiments, I sadly fear, fall on your ears like some echo 
from the haunted past; we don't feel that way nowadays. Had 
anyone laughed when Mr. Huger uttered those burning words 
nearly fifty years ago, he would have been kicked out of that 
Convention, though it was held in the House of God. Had any- 
one hissed, he would have been strangled. But how would such 
language affect you today, my friends? You would regard it 
as arrant demagoguey, pure and simple; it would be received 
with a " laugh in your sleeve,'' and would afterwards be the sub- 
ject of loud Olympian laughter. I doubt if there are ten men 
in South Carolina who could now give utterance to such 
sentiment, who would not be regarded as disingenuous if not 
demagogic. 

Andrews, the Republican critic, thus describes the effect then 
produced: "The scene was in the highest degree dramatic, — 
the venerable old man standing, between the platform and a 
table, with a supporting hand on each, and speaking in the most 
impassioned manner, with a clear resonant voice that easily 
filled the whole Church; every member of the Convention sitting 
with strained attention, the galleries bending over in silence the 
better to hear; a clerk standing near the feeble Huguenot Caro- 
linian to pass the glass of water while he spoke, and reach for 
him his staff when he had concluded." 



30 TRANSACTIONS 

Upon hearing of the death of his life long friend Petigrn Mr 
Huger wrote this remarkable tribute: 

"Conscientious in matters of truth, he would cavil about a 
hair. Generous and brave, he would give without measure and 
ask nothing in return. His probity was never shaken by adver- 
sity, and his gentleness and mercy were increased by his pros- 
perity. When he acted with others, it was because they agreed 
with him. When he was overpowered by numbers, he submitted 
to the law, never to the victor. * * Preaching the doctrine 
of an exalted benevolence, his charities kept pace with his teach- 
ings, and limited in means, when denial was necessary, he began 
always with himself." 

Unwittingly, the splendid Huguenot citizen in describing his 
dead friend, the great Huguenot lawyer, had drawn a pen 
picture of himself! 

The following paper by Dr. J. G. B, Bulloch, of Washington, 
D. C, being the only essay submitted by a member of the 
Society under the terms of the Prize Essay notice in the last 
Transactions, is printed in full herein — and to him is awarded 
the prize of $25.00:— 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE HUGUENOTS IN THE 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

Before stating what influence the Huguenots have had in the 
development of America, it becomes necessary to study the 
Nation from whence they derive their descent. The French, as 
history teaches, were a nation composed of a Celtic and other 
strains which became infused with that brave band of settlers 
known as the Franks, and in the course of time we discover that 
with a strain of Norman blood a race or family was produced 
which, taken all in all, had few if any equals. Taking a leading 
part in the affairs of Europe, "La Belle France" produced many 
eminent men in various walks of life. Her statesmen were the 
peers of any upon the continent. Her abodes of learning were 
sought by many and her language became the language of the 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 31 

European courts. Even in England the nobility added a"de" to 
their surnames. In music, in art and architecture, she took a 
foremost place. She had her warriors who were brave and chival- 
rous and her surgeons, physicians, engineers, scientists, became 
the foremost in Europe — in fact, without going into detail and 
mentioning by name many of her eminent citizens, suffice it to 
say that France took a leading part in the development of 
Europe. From such a nation came the Huguenots, firm of pur- 
pose, who resorvecT, rather than give up their liberty and religious 
convictions, they would for conscience sake seek a new land, 
where in peace and quietude, although facing a new life full of 
problems to solve, they would go even if they had to sacrifice 
wealth and home and leave dear kinsmen behind. 

The Huguenots were brave and chivalrous men, and many who 
settled in America were of noble origin. It is difficult to cite 
actual facts to prove that their influence was so great as to modify 
the character of the inhabitants of America. It is, of course, 
hard to prove that many institutions were alone due to the in- 
fusion of Huguenot blood, but when we study the history of 
France and notice that her people were brave, determined and 
leaders in intellectual development, witty and of courteous de- 
meanor, and then look into the Huguenot character, it would 
appear that those who made a home in this country did modify 
and mould to a certain degree the character of our inhabitants. 
The Huguenots settled in New York, Virginia, South Carolina, 
and a few in other States, and made quite an impression. Certain 
it is, that a race, who furnished lawyers, and statesmen and 
soldiers and whose blood became blended with that of other 
races, must have made an impress upon our laws and customs. 

As to contributions in aid of development, what names stand 
higher on the roll of honor than that of the Bayard family of 
New York, Pennsylvania and Delaware? Who could have 
founded an institution which, to those afflicted with deafness and 
dumbness, was more humane than that instituted by Gallaudet? 
What engineering feat surpassed that of de Lesseps, of France, or 
of Gaillard, of South Carolina? Who is better known in forestry 



32 TRANSACTIONS 

than Pinchot, or as a writer than F. Peyere Porcher, M.D., of 
Soutli Carolina? To whom are we more indebted for our liberty 
than the brave Marion, of South Carolina. Do we so soon forget 
the gallant Maury of Virginia? Look carefully into the lists of 
statesmen and try to see wherein we could have dispensed with 
the Huguenot. New York, as before remarked, had an infusion 
of Huguenot blood, and, although it is difficult to say to what ex- 
tent her institutions have been modified by that race of French- 
men, when we again review French history can we not discern 
that New York, the foremost State in the Union, owes a debt of 
gratitude to the Huguenot? 

In South Carolina the evidence becomes more and more cumu- 
lative as to the influence exerted by the Huguenot, for in that 
State where there has been much intermingling and intermarry- 
ing one can easily see the impress upon her inhabitants made by 
the Huguenot. In manners, in hospitality and in many excellent 
traits of character, the gentleman of South Carolina is unsur- 
passed by that of any other State. The Huguenot unquestion- 
ably had a modifying influence upon the customs, laws and 
improvement of South Carolina. 

It is impossible to go into detail or write in a short article 
biographical sketches of all the noted men who were born and 
bred in the State of South Carolina. We will therefore content 
ourselves with a list of a few, who either as gentlemen, 
planters, soldiers, lawyers, statesmen, etc., have added lustre 
(o the Commonwealth of South Carolina. What names stand 
higher on the roll of honor than Godin, Guerard, Mazyck, Mani- 
gault, Ravenel, Porcher, DuBose, Petigru, Gaillard, Bacot, 
Gignilliat, Gibert, Marion, Horry, Huger,Moragne, rrioleau, and 
many others? All that is asked is that the genealogist take each 
name and study it carefully and see if he will not be able to 
discern that, although all rose not to high positions as statesmen 
or as scientists, many of them were leading citizens and in 
various walks of life exemplified the stock from whence they 
came. Of four artists of considerable merit, one was of French 
descent, by name of DeVeaux. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OP SOUTH CAROLINA 33 

In Georgia, the Honorable James DeVeaux, Colonel and 
Senior Judge of Kings Court, was a man of prominence. His 
son, Major Peter DeVeaux, aide to Generals Gates and Howe, 
was a well known man, and from the DeVeauxs the Bulloch 
family of Georgia descend, so that this blood permeates through 
many families, and thus it can be seen that the blending of the 
Huguenot of South Carolina with the English and Scotch has 
produced many of recognized ability — gentlemen of intellectual 
attainments, of courage, honor and integrity. 

We know that different nationalities present characteristics 
peculiar to each, and that the French nation have peculiar traits 
of character and are noted for their vivacity, bravery, gracious- 
ness, chivalrous demeanor and intellectual attainments, and 
the refined features of their nobility. 

We are also aware of the sterling worth of the Scot in every 
way, his determination of purpose and his many excellent quali- 
ties. So with the Dutch, the German, and other peoples. We 
become cognizant of each individual trait, but each one differs 
in many ways and they are differentiated from each other. 

Now, if we can show that there exists amongst the inhabitants 
of our country certain traits of character belonging to them, 
which differ from those which characterize the descendant of the 
Scotch, English or German and have, although with an admix- 
ture of each nation, traits peculiarly French, we then are forced 
to admit that the Huguenot element has been a force in shaping 
the destiny of the nation. 

If we can further show that many of the Huguenot element 
have arisen to positions of eminence, or at least those with an 
admixture of that strain, we certainly would then be correct in 
admitting that the influence of the Huguenot has made an in- 
delible impress upon the customs, manners and destiny of this 
great Republic. 

Surely we cannot help being impressed with the courteous de- 
meanor of the South Carolina gentleman. We certainly must 
accord to him much which has been accomplished in the making 
of South Carolina, especially during the early history of the State, 



34 TRANSACTIONS 

which for a very long period was governed by those who resided 
in or near the seaboard. In all of these people we discern the 
peculiar trait of the Huguenot, in their customs, manner, intel- 
lectuality, brightness and general appearance, which certainly 
shows an intimate association with these settlers if not a rela- 
tionship. But, as a matter of fact, there are probably very 
few of those who resided in the lower part of South Carolina 
that did not have a strain of the Huguenot blood in their veins. 

Let those who write biographies and genealogies carefully 
go into detail in the matter and we are sure that the verdict 
will be that the Huguenot had a vast influence in the upbuild- 
ing of South Carolina. In South Carolina we find very early 
schools, one of the earliest medical colleges and medical socie- 
ties, early church organizations, interest in education, and men 
and women of refinement and culture and courteous demeanor. 
It is not asserted that the Huguenot accomplished alone all of 
the improvement, but the idea is to convey the impression that 
the Huguenot was one of the factors. We do know that in 
church matters her people early took a prominent part. We 
do know that among the prominent planters of rice we find many 
Huguenots, and we can show that as statesmen, orators, lawyers, 
physicians, soldiers and merchants the Huguenots stood in the 
front rank. 

Let the historian be a witness to the following names and see 
whether he can exclude from any of these families their right in 
the assertion that they, in part, made the State what it is. South 
Carolina certainly has been a factor in the making of American 
history, and the Huguenot, whose blood is infused in the veins 
of many, was certainly a factor in the making of South Carolina. 
See the following list of names of families of eminent worth: 

Bacot DeLeisseline Faucheraud 

Bonneau DeVeaux Gibert 

Chastaigner DuBose Gignilliat 

De St. Julien Dupont Godin 

DeSaussure DeRichbourg Guerard 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



35 



Gaillard 

GOURDIN 

guignard 

Horry 

Huger 

Jaudon 

Legare 

Lejau 

Lesesne 



LeSerurieb 

Manigault 

Marion 

Mazyck 

MORAGNE 

Ogier 
Pelot 
Peronneau 
Peyre 



PORCTIER 
POSTELL 

Prioleau 

Ravenel 

Robert 

Thomas 

Trapier 

Trouillart 

VlLLEPONTEAUX 



As we cannot go into detail in regard to the various promi- 
nent members of the family, let us without regard to dates take 
a cursory glance at a few of those who aided in the develop- 
ment of Church and State and in other ways: 

Who was commander of one of the first troops of horse but 
a Prioleau, and who were among the prominent physicians of 
Charleston but the Prioleaus? 

What better known families can be found anywhere than the 
planters Porcher, one of whom became a prominent writer and 
physician, F. Peyre Porcher? 

'Was it not a Gaillard who was for years President of the 
United States Senate, and was not one of them, Colonel Gaillard, 
instrumental in building the Panama Canal? 

To whom are we indebted in many ways but to the Ravenels? 

Among the eminent merchants of the early period we find a 
Mazyck— and a Manigault, who financially aided the State to 
steer through the stormy waters, whose son, Peter, a former 
Speaker of the Assembly, was also a Revolutionary soldier. 

Was not Benjamin Godin an eminent merchant and agent for 
South Carolina in England? 

A Guerard was member of the Council, another a Governor of 
the State. 

Who but a novice has not heard of those true and tried pa- 
triots, (Marion's men) the Horrys, Ravenels, Postells and others 
of the Huguenot group who kept the foe at bay? 

Among the prominent ministers we find DeRichbourg, Trouil- 
lart, and others. 



36 



TRANSACTIONS 



The deGignilliats are an old, well-known family. 

Dr. Gaillard Thomas and Marion Sims are historic medical 

personages. 

The Chancellors, DeSaussure and Lesesne, need no sketch as to 
their worth. Petigru and Hugh Swinton Legare were among 
our foremost men. 

The Giberts, Moragnes, Bonneaus are names well known in 
South Carolina. Then why, when we see these names and know 
that the blood of the Huguenot courses through many families, 
not acknowledge a self-evident fact that they were instrumental 
in the making of the country? 

Among other names of note in South Carolina, we find the 
following: 



Bruneau 

Chard on 

De la Plaine 

Le Noble 

Chastaigner 

Gendron 

Du Pre 



De Puy 

Couturier 

Guerin 

De la Motte 

De Longuemare 

CORDES 



De Cespigny 
De Cherigny 
De Lisle 
Du Gue 
Trezevant 

VlDEAU, AND OTHERS 



Among the notables of the Huger family we find General 
Isaac Huger, Major Benjamin Huger, United States Senator 
Daniel Elliott Huger, and Alfred Huger who was one of the 
first U. S. postmasters at Charleston and who with his prede- 
cessor, Thomas W. Bacot, held the postmastership for over 
seventy years from 1794 (the latter filling the office for nearly 
forty-one years.) 

The Gaillard family was especially noted as the following 
names and positions will show: 

Captain Peter Gaillard, son of Captain Peter Gaillard, 
Gaillard, the author, Col. Peter C. Gaillard, Mayor of Charles- 
ton, Dr. Edward Samuel Gaillard, Samuel Gaillard, officer in 
the United States Navy, Hon. John Gaillard, years and years 
United States Senator and President pro tern of the Senate, and 
Col. David duBose Gaillard. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 37 

The Ravenel family is one of prominence and was of noble 
French origin. Among members of the family we find Rene 
Ravenel, one of Marion's band during the Revolution, Dr. 
Henry W. Ravenel, a botanist of international reputation, Dr. 
Peter Ravenel, Dr. Edward Ravenel, Dr. Rene Ravenel, and 
besides these, Captain Henry and Dr. St. Julien Ravenel, and 
the two Ravenals who have aided the Huguenot Society so well 
as to enable it to weather adversity and preserve the traditions 
of this noble people, one of whom, Daniel, is now Secretary of 
the Huguenot Society. 

The Porchers are certainly remarkable in the numbers of men 
contributed to the profession of medicine and in various ways. 
Col. Thomas Porcher, Prof. Frederick Porcher, Major Samuel 
Porcher, Drs. William, Edward, Gough, John Palmer, Edward, 
F. Peyre, Julien T. Porcher, and others. 

Among other well-known names we find those of LeGrand, 
Pasquereaux, St. Julien, LeNoble, Mercier, Gibert, de Rich- 
bourg, and many, many others who as soldiers, planters, lawyers, 
scientists, physicians, botanists, ministers and statesmen, have 
advanced the State of South Carolina. We must repeat at 
times in order to accentuate our stand in the matter. The 
Hugers, Manigaults, Ravenels, Gaillards, Porchers, Marions and 
others, if we erase their names from the pages of history, would 
leave a gap showing a tremendous loss to the State. 

What would we do without Pury who founded Purysburg, or 
Gibert, or deRichbourg, and all those who brought over colonies 
to this country? If we leave out such eminent botanists as 
Ravenel, Porcher, Shecut, the learned physician and botanist, 
or De Veaux, the portrait painter, or Theus, or the eminent 
Henry Laurens, the Gaillards, Joel R. Poinsett, Hon. Wm. John- 
son, Senators Gaillard and Huger, Governor Guerard, Hon. Hugh 
S. Legare, the Generals Marion and Huger, the Bacots, and 
many others, how great the loss would be! To the judiciary, 
legislative and executive the Huguenot has given his quota as 
well as to the church and during war times. So, then, as we go 
through the different histories of the States and consult those 



38 TRANSACTIONS 

historians who have contributed to the history of the Huguenot, 
we are aware of much that we never dreamed. All honor, then, 
to Baird, to Brock, to Rev. Robert Wilson, and others, who have 
placed Huguenot history where the clear light of day shows 
them to have been sans pcur ct sans reproclic. 

As we leave the gallant State upon whose history we have so 
long dwelt, let us briefly take a glance at a few names of Hugue- 
not descent of more or less national importance from different 
States, who have occupied, in national affairs as presidents, as 
associate justices, attorney generals, as well as in the professions, 
prominent positions. We find their descendants holding places 
of responsibility in law, medicine and other walks of life. 

Among the Presidents of the United States, of Huguenot de- 
scent, we find John Tyler of Virginia, and Theodore Roosevelt of 
New York, descended from the Hon. Col. James DeVeaux of 
Georgia, the Hon. ''Henry Laurens, President under the Articles 
of Confederation." 

Vice-Presidents Eldridge Gerry and Theodore Roosevelt, and 
two Presidents of the Continental Congress, Cyrus Griffin and 
Henry Laurens. 

Secretarys of State, Hon. John Jay, Thomas F. Bayard, Hugh 
Swinton Legare. 

Attorneys General of the United States, Hon. John McPher- 
son Berrien, of Georgia, son of Major John Berrien of Georgia, 
son of Judge Berrien of New Jersey, Hugh Swinton Legare of 
South Carolina, Kdwards Pierrepont, Isaac Toucey, Reverdy 
Johnson. 

Secretary of War, Hon. Joel R. Poinsett of South Carolina. 

Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. 

Secretary of the Treasury, Albert Gallatin. George B. 
Cortelyou. 

President pro tern of the U. S. Senate for many years, Hon. 
John Gaillard. 

Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States, 
Hon. John Jay of New York, Hon. William Johnson of South 
Carolina, Hon. L. Q. C. Lamar of Mississippi, and Hon. Joseph 
R. Lamar of Georgia. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 39 

United States Ministers abroad, Hon. Albert Gallatin, Hon. 
Henry Rootes Jackson of Georgia, descended from the Jacqueline 
family of Virginia, and Hon . Alexander Robert Lawton of Georgia, 
descended from the Rev. Pierre Robert of South Carolina, 
Thomas F. Bayard of Delaware, and Gerard of New York. 

Confederate States Naval Agents abroad, Capt. James Dun- 
wody Bulloch of Georgia, descended from Hon. Col. James 
DeVeaux of Georgia, and Commodore Maury, the author of the 
" Geography of the Sea," descended from the LaFontaine family 
of Virginia. 

Engineers, the noted Col. David duBose Gaillard of the 
Panama Canal and the gallant Sevier, many times Governor of 
Tennessee and ''Governor of the State of Franklin. " 

Botanists, and eminent physicians, Henry W. Ravenel of 
international reputation, Dr. J. L. E. W. Shecut, one of the 
founders of Charleston Museum, Dr. Francis Peyre Porcher, 
Dr. Wm. Gaston Bulloch. 

Ministers, Rev. Joseph Clay Stiles, the Evangelist, descended 
from the Pelots, the Rev. Moses Hoge, and others. 

The Lamar family, who have furnished so many men of promi- 
nence to the country, among whom we mention: Mirabeau B. 
Lamar, President of Texas; L. Q. C. Lamar, United States Sena- 
tor, Secretary of the Interior and Associate Justice of the United 
States Supreme Court; Associate Justice Joseph R. Lamar of 
the United States Supreme Court; Joseph R. Lamar, Member 
of Congress; Col. C. A. L. Lamar; George B. Lamar, Postmaster 
of Savannah; Col. Albert Lamar, Editor; Col. Thompson B. 
Lamar of Fifth Florida Regiment, Confederate States of Ameri- 
ca; and another Attorney General of Florida. 

United States Senators: Hon. John Gaillard and D. E. Huger 
of South Carolina, Hons. James A. Bayard, James A. Bayard, 
Jr., Richard H. Bayard, and Thomas F. Bayard of Delaware, 
John Tyler of Virginia, George Poindexter of Mississippi, Hon. 
Wm. Bellinger Bulloch of Georgia, Depew, John McPherson 
Berrien of Georgia, Reverdy Johnson of Maryland — and Hon.H. 
A. du Pont, now Senator from Delaware. 



40 TRANSACTIONS 

Among the various delegates and representatives of the States 
at different times we find the following Huguenot names: 

Laurens, Boudinot, Pierrepont, Edwards, Gerry, Condit, 
Guyon, Poinsett, Poindexter, DeWitt, Duer, l'Hommedieu, 
Govan, Gervais, Huger, Trapier, Lecompte, Griffin (Cyrus), 
Sevier, Duvall, Lamar, DeGraff, DeGraffenreid, Legare, Dellet, 
Winthrop, Pettit, Delano, Petrie, Boutell, Crozier, Flournoy, 
Chastain, Rantoul, Berrere, DeSaussure, Noel, Capron. 

Although Congress seems to have had more of English and 
Scotch descent, these names so well known but speak the 
Huguenot influence. 

We are tempted to say, "Why delay longer in our verdict in 
favor of the Huguenot when we have found such an array of 
names on the roll of honor as Jays, Bayards, du Ponts, Faneuils, 
Gallaudets, Gaillards, the LeContes, Aubudon, Maurys, Seviers, 
Laurens, Sigourneys, Tylers, Bullochs, Bowdoins, Flournoys, 
Washingtons, Lewis's, Warners, Legares, lingers, Sigourneys 
and many others — why delay?" That we may make more per- 
fect our assertion and show by the history of other Status that the 
blood of the Huguenot permeates the whole fabric and has made 
a superior race in America. 

In fact, in all walks of life as physicians, jurists, statesmen, 
teachers, merchants, the Huguenot influence has been unques- 
tionably felt to a large extent. 

In Georgia we find the Huguenot names of De la Gall an 
officer in Oglethorpe's Regiment. Demere, a French gentleman. 
James DeVeaux, Colonel and Senior Associate Justice of Kings 
Court, and his son, Major Peter DeVeaux who held many posi- 
tions and was a Revolutionary officer and aide to Generals 
Lincoln, Howe and Gates. Mauve, Morel, Pelot, Anciaux, 
Flournoy, Guerard, DuBose, Berrien, Lamar, Le Conte. And 
although, as we see, they were a small number as compared to 
her sister Colony of South Carolina, it is quite astonishing to 
discover how the blood of these people permeated many 
families of the State. These families were well known and 
most of historic importance who in various ways aided Georgia. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 41 

Among these we find a branch of the Adams family of Georgia 
who descended from the Mauves, as also the following weJl- 
known people: branches of the Bryans, Stiles, Kings, Boltons, 
Habershams, Bullochs, Newells, Footmans and Turners. All of 
the Bulloch family descended from Col. James DeVeaux, and one 
branch from the Marions of South Carolina. A branch of Adams 
from Flournoy. The Kings of Roswell, Georgia, from the de 
Gignilliats and the Le Seruriers of South Carolina, Col. Noble 
Jones through < Mauve. A branch of Heyward through De- 
Veaux, and Guerard of Brantley through DeVeaux. A branch 
of Anderson through Berrien, and the Doctors Charles, John 
B., and William B. Burroughs through Anciaux who came over 
in the fleet with d'Estaing. The gallant Dunwody family of 
Georgia descends from Hon. Col. James DeVeaux. There are 
descendants of the de la Galls, the Morels, the Demeres and the 
Pelots still in existence. It was the gallant Pelot who captured 
the Water Witch during the date war between the States. Rev. 
Joseph Clay Stiles, the Evangelist, was a descendant of the 
Pelots. A branch of the Lewis's descended from the Mauves, 
and the Lawtons from Rev. Pierre Robert. 

All of these Huguenot families were of more or less promi- 
nence in Georgia, and their descendants in male or female line 
were people well known and several became very prominent, 
among whom we may mention Col. Theodore Roosevelt, who 
descended from James DeVeaux, son of Andre DeVeaux, gentle- 
man, a planter in South Carolina. 

Although the English, the Scotch and the Saltzburghers aided 
in making Georgia, we claim that the Huguenot was also a 
factor. Can a strong strain of Huguenot blood be held in abey- 
ance by other ones? If so, the history of America fails to 
show that the Huguenot was a factor. Although we are much 
indebted to the Scotch, the English, the Dutch and other 
settlers, for their admirable traits as educators, which have be- 
come infused in such a manner as to have formed a fine people, 
it certainly seems quite right to accord to the Huguenots that 
peculiar courtesy of manner, that independence, that determi- 



42 TRANSACTIONS 

nation to succeed; that quickness of perception and those other 
characteristics belonging to them. It is scarcely likely that 
those men, who held positions of prominence in Church and 
State, did not leave an impress upon the country. 

As before stated, it is impossible to give in a sketch like 
this the genealogy of families of Huguenot descent or show, in 
many cases, those individuals which have a strain of this blood 
in their veins, because we have not the time and space tu write 
biographical sketches of each one; but the idea to be conveyed 
is not that the Huguenot has been a dominant factor, but that 
he has so contributed toward the making of history that his 
influence has been seen and felt upon this great continent. 

In the celestial spheres we notice some stars of resplendent 
brightness, which, although they do not dominate or control the 
others, yet are of such an element of beauty and of worth that 
they add lustre to the whole. 

If we add certain chemicals to water, we do not necessarily 
see them, but, although dissolved in this medium, we know that 
they are existent and that without them the desired combination 
would be imperfect. These similes may be applied to the 
Huguenot influence. We know how much Continental Europe 
lost when these brave and persevering people left the country 
and how much England and America gained in the arts, profes- 
sions and various walks of life, in religion, piety, and in many 
other ways, and to this day France undoubtedly shows this 
loss. 

Besides going into statesmanship and into the arts and sci- 
ences, and professions of law and medicine, the Huguenot influ- 
ence was extended even to the naming of counties of the different 
States. Although we can see many French names of counties 
in the West and in Louisiana, we have not enrolled these as they 
were probably due to Roman Catholic French — hence we only 
place those on record which show the liuguenot influence. 
Among them we find the following counties: Abbeville, Berrien, 
LaFayette, Laurens, DeWitt, Gallatin, DuBois, Aubudon, 
Menifee, Beauregard, Colbert, Lamar, Marion, Chicot, Desha, 



1 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



4* 



Sevier, Poinsett, Duval, Fauquier, Montague, Maury, Laclede, 
Gaston, Horry, Chariton, and Brevard— besides counties in 
Louisiana and Michigan. 

We find that the Huguenots settled in New York, Massa- 
chusetts, Virginia and other States, especially in South Carolina, 
and established churches in these States. 

About 1688 we find, according to Baird, probably two hundred 
of these settlers in New York, and that some settled in the city 
of New York and some at New Rochelle and elsewhere. Some 
went to Boston, Massachusetts, and a few of these eventually 
to Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware. 

Among many names we will only mention a few, but suffice it 
to say that, for the reasons elsewhere given in this paper, the 
Huguenot element was a big factor from a standpoint of influ- 
ence. The names of these are for the most part well known, 
such as — 



DuBois 

Demarest 

DeForest 

Labarie 

Boudinot 

Peiret 

DeLancey 

Reverdy 

Daille 

Faneuil 



Allaire 
Bernon 
Bowdoin 

SlGOURNEY 

Robert 

Bernardeau 

D'Harriette 

Grasset 

Guichard 

Lucas 



PlNTARD 

Berman 

Valleau 

Bureau 

ClLAILLE 

Gallaudet 
Gallatin 

ClIARDON 

Delano 
deVaux 



We have already mentioned the noted family of Bayard, 
who have so much contributed to history and whose blood 
permeates so many people. The DeLanceys, the Jays, the 
Faneuils, the Gallaudets, the Bowdoins, from whom descended 
the Hon. Robert Winthrop, the Delanos, DuBois, du Ponts, 
Gallatins, Pintards, are names so well known that it is self-evi- 
dent as to their influence. 

At Manikin town, the Huguenot settlement in Virginia, is 
where we find names of eminent worth and it becomes scarcely 



44 TRANSACTIONS 

necessary to attempt to outline the influence of the Huguenot in 
Virginia. 

By perusing Brock's genealogy of the family of De la 
Fontaine, from whom descends Commodore Maury, author of 
''Physical Geography of the Sea," and the families of DuPuy, 
Marye, and Chastain, it soon becomes quite evident as to how 
much the Huguenot blood has been diffused in Virginia. From 
Bertrand descends Cyrus Griffin, of the Supreme Court of 
Admiralty, and his brothers. From Dr. Contesse, whose daugh- 
ter, Ann, married John Tyler, we have John Tyler, Governor 
of Virginia, and his son, President Tyler of the United States. 
From the Jacquelines descend the famous Ambler family and a 
branch of the Jackson family of Georgia. From the ministers 
Lacy descends the celebrated Divine, Rev. Moses Drury Hoge. 

Then, too, we still further discern the descent of Major Lomax 
from Micou, and. find, among others, the distinguished Pasteur 
family, the Mauzys, and Latanes, Professor Maupin, of the 
University of Virginia; and that the Duvals furnished a Governor 
of the State of Florida, who had a county named for him. A 
Flournoy was Member of Congress and another the Secretary ol 
Virginia. Surely this is enough evidence to prove the influence 
of the Pluguenot in Virginia. 

Through the marriage of Col. George Reade, member of the 
-Council of Virginia, who married a daughter of Monsieur Mar- 
tian and had a daughter, Mildred Reade, who married Augustine 
Warner, we find an alliance to Lawrence Washington and the 
Lewises and the Cobbs, thus bringing in the descendants of the 
Garrards, Glenns, Smiths, Jacksons, Princes, Adams, and 
many others in Georgia. 

In Maryland we find the Chailles, and in the District of Co- 
lumbia the Johnston family of Georgia descended from Bellamy 
Roche, a family of note. 

We might go on thus showing eminent men through all the 
States, descended from those who gave up home, country, and 
kindred for liberty of conscience and freedom of thought and 
action, to found in the New World a home which, through per- 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OS SOUTH CAROLINA 45 

severance, they made; but enough has been said to show the 
influence of the Huguenots in the making of America. 

[Note. — The Society cannot be responsible for mistakes in names and otherwise, 
which may appear in papers contributed to its Transactions.] 



The following paper by Mr. 0. B. Duliois, of Weehawken, N. 
J., who is not a member of the Society and therefore cannot 
compete (under 'the terms of the Prize Essay notice in the last 
Transactions) for the prize offered, is deemed so worthy of 
publication as to induce its insertion herein: — 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE HUGUENOTS IN THE 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

If it were possible to register the force or impetus imparted to 
Colonial life by the sum total of human units which represented 
the Huguenot settlers in America, the results would scarcely 
convey an adequate conception of their influence;. 

They were the human elements which represented a new prin- 
ciple in world progress, and principles are rather elusive when 
one attempts to compile them in terms of heroic achievement. 
Likewise do they evade the square and compass of individual 
records. 

It was not by any means an experimental structure which 
they brought to America- -no fabrication of theories which would 
vaporize under the stern realities of practice — no visionary sys- 
tem of ethics which was to be launched under Utopian conditions. 
A people singularly free from fanaticism, and wonderfully en- 
dowed with common sense. 

To underestimate the effect of Huguenot sacrifices in France, 
upon the minds of other European settlers in America, is to be- 
little their knowledge of world events. The very fact that 
France had followed a policy of "Total extermination" prompted 
the settlers of every other nationality in America to admire, and 
applaud the spirit which dominated the struggling Huguenot 
colonies. 



46 TRANSACTIONS 

The social impulse in man has often prompted co-operation 

in the establishment of community interests, but such move- 
ments are largely altruistic, and seldom dominated by practical 
minds. Rarely does the community withstand the leaven of 
materialism when it appears. Whenever this saturated solution 
of individual selfishness has been attained, the change is as evi- 
dent as it would be in a chemical reaction—disintegration has 
followed. 

The Huguenot communities were built on a firmer base — the 
first law of human existence "self preservation" — and it was this 
elemental impetus which gave their colonial struggles a vitality 
not always found among other settlers. 

However conspicuous their initial failures w^ere under the heroic 
efforts of Admiral Coligny — they but emphasize the Spartan-like 
characteristics of these people. 

Three successive attempts to establish Huguenot colonies were 
made by this patriot and seer; for such he was. When we con- 
sider that his first colony (Rio Janeiro, 1555) was attempted just 
seventeen years prior to the fatal night of St. Bartholomew, we 
gain some insight into his prophetic vision. He "sensed" the 
trend of French political thought, — divined the chaos, and in- 
evitable disaster which must eventually engulf his co-religionists. 

Beyond the seas there was to be an empire in the making, 
where liberty of conscience would at least dare to exert itself. 

Strictly speaking; the origin of Huguenot influence in America 
inuU its inception in those thirty pioneers of Coligny's second 
colony, who remained at Port Royal, S. C. (1562), when their 
compatriots sailed away — remained "with such good will, and 
jolly corage" as Jean Ribaut tells us in his famous account of the 
enterprise. To gather all the historical data, at our command, 
which relates to this piteous little colony, would not take long: 
it is so meagre a story of waiting in idleness and uncertainty — 
of hunger and mutiny, of despair and desperation, which be- 
came so unbearable as to eventually prompt them to put to sea 
in a craft of their own rude construction, that they might escape 
the solitude and uncertainty of it all. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 47 

Graver dangers, however, awaited them upon the sea, where 
their crowning horror was the sacrifice of one of their number in 
their last attempt to prolong life. Although finally rescued by 
an English vessel, they were nevertheless taken to England as 
captives. What an inglorious fate was theirs! But who will 
venture the statement that their efforts were in vain? True, 
the historical tablets are engraved with the record of their failure 
as colonists, but tradition, and possibly history, records the fact 
that Queen Elizabeth's attention was directed toward American 
colonization through an interview with one of the survivors of 
this expedition. Thus did the first Huguenot, and first actual 
American colony, create an influence on English maritime and 
colonization interests. It is just possible that the cordial invi- 
tation issued by Great Britain to Huguenot emigrants at the 
commencement of the next century had its inception in this 
incident. At any rate the Huguenots were not only invited, 
but made welcome in all of England's twelve colonial possessions 
at the commencement of the seventeenth century. 

Up to the time of the Port Royal Colony, the old world had 
been actuated by many motives in coming to America. Dis- 
covery, exploration, conquest, treasure, and trade, each in turn, 
had been the incentive, but it remained for the Huguenot to 
attempt the establishment of the first colony where liberty of 
conscience was to be the dominating factor. 

Some twenty-five years later, Sir Walter Raleigh discovered 
that the founding of a colony was of such difficulty, that it re- 
quired the aid of many people. The "Lost Colony" of Virginia 
was undoubtedly the underlying incident, which prompted him 
to " delegate rights" to his Virginia associates. 

Coligny's second attempt to found another American colony, 
or, more accurately designated, his third attempt in the New 
World, was equally disastrous, but was probably the incentive 
which influenced the Spanish settlement of St. Augustine. 
Under the leadership of Laudbnniere they built a fort on the 
St. John's river in Florida, and named it Carolina, even as the 
previous settlement in South Carolina had been called. This 



48 TRANSACTIONS 

settlement was also fated to undergo that initial period of want 
and distress which seemed so inseparable from all colonization 
effort. One almost shrinks from a truthful presentation of their 
sufferings, as it conjures a mental picture which is both morbid 
and morose. 

Their supplies exhausted, starvation confronted them, and 
they were forced to turn to Nature's crudest forms of animal 
and vegetable life — roots, sorrel, pounded hsh-bones, and even 
roasted snakes. 

"Ofttimes" says Laudonniere "our poor soldiers were con- 
strained to give away the very shirts from their backs to get one 
tish. If at any time there were shewed unto the savages the ex- 
cessive price which they tooke, these villians would answer them 
roughly; 'If thou make so great account of thy merchandise 
eat it, and we will eat our fish;' then fell they out alaughing, 
and mocked us with open throat." 

To those who ponder darkly over combinations of circum- 
stances, which may be described as " fatalistic," the historical 
record of this heroic little colony will furnish a wealth of specu- 
lative material. In the hour of their "final extremity" they re- 
ceived, through the arrival of Jean Ribaut, the necessities which 
were required to place the colony on a firm footing. Their ordeal 
was ended. A wonderful thing had occurred. They had dem- 
onstrated the possibility of surviving the period required to 
succor them from their base of supplies (France). The Span- 
iards at Cuba may, or may not have had knowledge of this colony 
at the time of its inception. If they did, they may have con- 
sidered it advisable to await developments. Coligny's previous 
attempts had proven abortive. Perhaps this one would. At 
any rate, whether by intent or accident, the hour of their de- 
cision to exterminate it was co-incident with the arrival of 
Ribaut (1564). 

Menendez, who led the Spanish forces, massacred almost the 
entire population. Thus ended the colonial ambitions of 
Coligny, and the first Huguenot settlement in America, or to put 
it in more striking form — thus ended the first American settle- 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 49 

ment which was of Huguenot origin. To the student, who gathers 
the shreds and tatters — the broken threads, and fag-ends of 
Huguenot history and traditions — these colonies have a para- 
mount value. Their influence on American affairs was not by 
any means negative. History supplies us with a record of nu- 
merous failures which seem to rebound, and the Coligny failures 
are among them. Had his efforts done no more than to set 
before the Huguenots of France an idealized conception of po- 
litical freedom/ they would not have been in vain. They did 
more than this. They gave absolute promise of the ultimate 
establishment of a new social order, wherein they might play 
their part. 

While the great exodus of Huguenots did not take place until 
a later date, and even when it did occur, they were not allowed 
to settle in French colonial possessions. The striking fact in con- 
nection with the Coligny colonies is this: none of their failures 
prompted a desire to cast their lot with the French in Canada, 
where Cartier had established a trading post (Montreal) some 
thirty years before Coligny sent out his first band of colonists. 
Apparently, their object was to place as much distance between 
themselves and Cartier as possible. At least six thousand miles 
of wilderness. 

The Huguenot's conception of liberty was diametrically op- 
posed to all French standards of that period, and it is this funda- 
mental principle of democracy, based on liberty of conscience, 
which has contributed a strong influence in American affairs. 

If liberty of conscience was the logical sequence of events to 
follow the establishment of the printing press in Europe, it is safe 
to assert that the Declaration of Independence followed liberty 
of conscience in America, and the next great document to follow 
the Declaration was our Constitution. 

The present generation scarcely realizes the political chaos, 
which preceded the adoption of this cardinal document — the lack 
of unity in the several States. However, it eventually emerged 
from the National councils as the supreme "Magna Charta" of 
America, and triumphed over the great civil conflict of a later 
date. 



50 TRANSACTIONS 

Thus have men ever hastened to the conflict when they felt 
that their personal rights were being assailed, and immediately 
after the victory they have always been equally as quick to 
publish the document which proclaims their authority. These 
documents are the monuments of our civilization. The Edict 
of Nantes — The Declaration of Independence — The Constitution 
of the United States. 

In the conflicts, which have been waged to weld the eternal 
principles of these "rights" into visible and authoritative form, 
you can number Huguenots by legions. It has ever been their 
desire to create this documentary evidence of their political 
and religious rights, and America has been quick to acknowledge 
the debt due them in transferring religious authority from 
Church and State to the documentary authority of Holy Writ. 

Among all those early colonists, none better than the Hugue- 
nots could appreciate those immortal lines "Life, liberty, and the 
pursuit of happiness/' 

The significance of this particular sentence is more striking 
when we associate it with the fact that, out of the seven Presi- 
dents of the Congress of Philadelphia, three were of Huguenot 
parentage. 

Experimental democracy had no place or part in the forms of 
government set up by these people in their colonies. Their con- 
ception of the principle was concrete. There was an absolutism 
in their judicial and executive forms, which bordered on the mun- 
archial in their severity. They rigidly adhered to the funda- 
mental principles of a government, which derived its powers 
solely from the consent of the governed. 

An illustration of this democratic spirit is to be found in the 
documents which have come to us from the Huguenot settlement 
of New Paltz, New York. There is a directness and simplicity 
about them, which pays a magnificent tribute to the ideality of 
the men who constructed them. Their purpose does not admit 
of speculation or debate. A sense of justice and equity, that is 
compatible with the highest standards of jurisprudence, under- 
lies each document. The rights of the individual are asserted 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 51 

with an exactitude that admits of no other interpretation, and 
community interests are safeguarded for the advancement of 
the common weal. 

The first government inaugurated by this colony was patri- 
archal, in that the heads of families met to frame regulations for 
the general welfare; and the suggestion of Old Testament inllu- 
ence in this form is worthy of consideration. In this connection 
it is also interesting to note the names, which the leader of this 
colony gave to his children: Abraham,' Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, 
David, Solomon, Louis, Matthew. The two last names were 
evidently concessions to family claims, as Louis was the father's 
name and Matthew was a family name on the maternal side. 

As we collect the fragments of historical data, such as the fore- 
going, it assists us in the attempt to analyze the influence of 
Huguenot life upon those early "political forms, " which were 
hammered out on the forge of stern necessity — forms which went 
into the corner stories of our Republic. It also shortens the 
search when we attempt to locate the foundations of pure dem- 
ocracy in America; and if, as we claim, democracy is indebted 
to Huguenot thought, then how marvelous that France should 
have displayed such splendid enthusiasm over the Declaration of 
Lidependence when Franklin expounded it there in 1776! One 
can not help but conclude that the history of France might have 
been different, if the Huguenots could have propagated their 
doctrines on their native soil. How different the French Revo- 
lution might have been, if this great middle class of Frenchmen 
could have acted as buffer between the aristocracy and the 
rabble. 

Before dismissing the New Paltz settlement, it will be of in- 
terest to add that, some years after the establishment of their 
patriarchal government, they substituted a form equally demo- 
cratic, which was known as "The Government of the Dusine" 
or twelve men, who were elected annually with power to act and 
set in order and unify certain affairs. This is the only form of 
its kind that colonial history records. 

The Editor of The New Paltz Independent, who is also the 



52 TRANSACTIONS 

author of "History of New Pal tz and Its Old Families/' calls atten- 
tion to the fact that more homesteads have been handed down 
from generation to generation in this Huguenot town than in 
any other part of the country. In these days of steam-heated 
flats and moving vans at three minutes' notice, his remarks are 
duly impressive. We beg the privilege of quoting from his valu- 
able work: "In the house in which I was born, my father lived 
before me. My grandfather spent his days there. My great 
grandfather dwelt there. A few rods off my great-great-grand- 
father's house was built." 

The influence of the Huguenot in the religious and political 
life of America is so strongly defined that we sometimes lose 
sight of his many social characteristics. By nature, he was 
an optimist. Circumstances neither dominated him, or con- 
spired for his defeat. Like the vine and olive of his native land, 
he required sunny, genial skies, and sought the magic of mirth 
to clear them. Withal he knew how to balance his genial French 
disposition with the stern Calvinistic doctrines of his faith. 

Statistics, even though they were available, would fail us in 
an attempt to determine in what degree American character has 
been influenced by this Huguenot trait. It is from more subtle 
and almost elusive material that we must gather our evidence. 
One thing is certain— the Huguenot differed from the austere- 
Puritan. The latter was a reformer, while the Huguenot evinced 
naught of this spirit. He himself was a product of religious in- 
tolerance, and besides that he was a Frenchman — quick to sepa- 
rate the essentials from the non-essentials, but adamant in 
defending his standards — once they were formed. 

Whatever the Huguenots' contribution to this characteristic 
American trait of " Bounding Optimism," the fact remains that 
no Nation possesses it in the same degree. Perhaps we are 
influenced by the thought that, no matter how serious an evil 
may become, it can always be eradicated by the judicious use 
of the ballot. It is safe to assert that no other country could 
have marshalled so many adherents to the tenets of Christian 
Science in so short a period — a religion of "Bounding Optimism." 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 53 

One of optimism's most gracious gifts to her devotees is the 
quality of adaptability, and the history of the American Hugue- 
nots presents numerous instances of their ready compliance with 
circumstances as they found them. This inherent quality finds 
expression at New Rochelle, New York, where the Huguenot 
Society now occupies the Tom Paine homestead as their head- 
quarters, where one can find Huguenot relics and Tom Paine 
relics, side by side. 

What a wondrous change time has wrought ! Tom Paine, who 
thundered so mightily against the Scriptures — under the same 
roof with the Huguenot Society! A tribute to the organiza- 
tion, which true to traditional methods of thought, has distin- 
guished between Tom Paine, the Theist, and Tom Paine, the 
Patriot. 

As further evidence of this quality of "adaptability" it is in- 
teresting to recall the fact that during the first half of the seven- 
teenth century there were some eight hundred Huguenot churches 
in France, and in all the principal cities they maintained Hugue- 
not colleges, but their church affiliations in America were with 
every denomination. The natural assumption would be, that, 
owing to the disadvantage they were under in not speaking the 
language of the various colonies in which they settled, a stronger 
effort would have been made to establish Huguenot congrega- 
tions—but there is little evidence of such an attempt. There 
was a French church in New York, and one in Boston; the his- 
tory of which is replete with melodramatic interest, but they 
were evidently established as a matter of expediency, rather than 
a deliberate attempt to form the nucleus of a National Huguenot 
Church. It does not require an exhaustive search into denomi- 
national history to reveal the extent of French Protestantism 
in the several bodies. Taking a single illustration — the Episco- 
pal Church of America is indebted to Huguenot stock for many of 
its prominent names, among both the clergy and the laymen. 
Among these we find the names of Bishop Delany, of the State of 
New York, and Samuel Provoost who was Chaplain of the first 
Continental Congress — also Mr. Neau, who was instrumental 
in founding Trinity School in New York. 



54 TRANSACTIONS 

If it were necessary to present additional evidence of this 
valuable characteristic of temperamental flexibility, it certainly 
could be found in the action of the General Court of Massachu- 
setts in their gift of a tract of land eight miles square at Oxford, 
and a cordial invitation to the Huguenots to settle there. This 
act is worthy of more than passing notice when we recall the 
attitude of New England toward the Quakers, and the rigid 
discipline they^ enforced upon the slightest evidence of depart- 
ure from orthodox standards. They evidently considered that 
this Huguenot colony would be a valuable acquisition. 

It was this colony that gave Massachusetts the name of 
Baudon (Bowdoin) and the college of that name. Likewise did 
the Commonwealth honor the son of this Huguenot refugee by 
making him their governor. There is another name, of which 
this State will ever be proud, and the honor of which has extended 
throughout the Union — Peter Faneuil, who on September 10, 
1742, delivered the key of the building which bears his name to 
the Selectmen of Boston. Faneuil Hall will ever be the Mecca of 
the American patriot, the cradle of liberty, the political shrine 
before which we bow and know not whether our emotions 
quicken through liberty-loving impulses or because we sense the 
religious significance of this historical old building. 

Another name which deserves close association with that of 
Faneuil, is John Jay, President of Congress 1779, Governor of 
the Empire State, Chief justice of the United States, Repre- 
sentative of his country at the Court of Louis XVI, President 
of the American Bible Society, and President of the Society for 
the Emancipation of the Slaves. 

Few Americans have left behind them a record more honored. 
None have been actuated by finer motives. 

Preceding John Jay, the presidency of the Bible Society was 
held by Elias Boudinot, another Huguenot of that long list who 
have served their country so nobly. 

In attempting an analysis of Huguenot influence in America 
there is one feature which should not be omitted. Their num- 
bers were comparatively few, but, whatever the numerical loss, 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 55 

it was made up by the compensating value of quality. No 
American of Huguenot ancestry need offer an apology for stating 
this fact, because it is capable of demonstration and beyond the 
possibility of being classified as "ancestral pride." 

Ample opportunity was given to every French Huguenot to 
recant, to declare the error of his way, and return to the Roman 
Catholic fold. It would be foreign to the intent and purpose of 
this article to recall the inhuman methods resorted to in France 
to bring about this recantation. The important fact for us is 
that the Huguenot made his decision a conscience test. It was 
no battle for a weakling, but called for the exercise of those 
supreme virtues which reveal men of heroic mould. The Puri- 
tan had far greater latitude and room for compromise with his 
conscience. His problem at home was one of dissatisfaction, 
not destruction — extenuation, not extermination. The Puri- 
tan would erect a new structure upon the old foundation, but the 
Huguenot's "all" was swept from under him —structure, foun- 
dation, and site. 

It was this supreme test of ethical and religious standards, 
which culled the weakling, broke the will of those who dared to 
waver, and gave to America only those who had withstood the 
"Conscience test." 

Perhaps the most sublime example of optimistic faith, that any 
sect or nationality can boast of, is to be found in the record that 
Judith Manigault, of the South Carolina Colony, has bequeathed 
to us. "Since our leaving France," she wrote, "we have ex- 
perienced every sort of affliction, disease, pestilence, famine, 
poverty, hard labour. I have been six months without tasting 
bread, working like a slave, and I have passed three or four 
years without having it when I wanted it, and yet God has done 
great things for us in enabling us to bear up under so many 
trials." 

As we read such testimony, we can understand the spirit 
which prompted some of the Huguenots to inscribe the motto 
"Tiens ta Joy" (Hold to thy faith) on their armorial ensigns. 

No city in our country reflects to a greater degree the inrlu- 



56 TRANSACTIONS 

ence of Huguenot culture and thrift than Charleston. At one 
time there were as many as 16,000 Huguenot residents in this 
community. Their charity was proverbial, while their elegance 
of manners created standards of deportment which have left 
an indelible impression on the social atmosphere of this aristo- 
cratic southern city. Their plantations were magnificent, and 
the husbandry of the State is indebted to them for the introduc- 
tion of many forms of plant and tree life, known to France, but 
not native to the American soil. Their descendants have en- 
riched the citizenship of every State in the Union, To know the 
full extent of their influence in educational, legislative, and com- 
mercial pursuits, one must necessarily turn from public records 
to the more intimate family traditions of this sterling Huguenot 
stock. 

No essay or sketch of Huguenot life and influence in America 
would be complete without a word relative to their industrial 
activities, and, however cursory such an allusion must neces- 
sarily be in a paper of this length, the subject demands a moment 
of thought. 

The heroic efforts made by France to detain the Huguenot on 
French soil is one of the strange events in connection with their 
awful persecution. Charles Dickens admitted his fascination for 
this phase of French history, and has given us, in one of his im- 
mortal sketches, an insight into the workings of the great govern- 
mental and military net which was spread over the entire coun- 
try for the purpose of detecting those who would escape. Dr. 
Baird has also embodied one of these intensely "human inter- 
est" stories in his exhaustive work. 

The motive is self-evident, and complimentary in the highest 
degree to Huguenot efficiency. France had not counted upon 
losing the back-bone of her industrial and professional life. 
Persecution was one thing, but escape was quite another. Her 
weavers of silk, dyers, printers, merchants, bankers, physi- 
cians, barristers, professors, farmers — all were fleeing France 
not by thousands, but by millions. It began to be apparent 
that the religious movement was disturbing business. There 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY Of SOUTH CAROLINA 57 

were the furriers and hatters of Caudebeck — they had disap- 
peared to a man, and the Cardinals of the Holy College had to 
send to England, whither they had gone, for their red hats. 
So completely had this branch of industry ceased to exist, that 
the art was lost to France for forty years — in fact, it did not 
return until it was stolen from England. The cloth makers of 
Champagne likewise vanished. There were no more linens of 
Normandy, or silks of Tours and Lyons. The tan yards of 
Touraine were vacant, and the paper-makers of Auvergne gone. 
In 1669 by actual count there were 44,200 woolen weavers in 
France, and. the industry was almost a monopoly of the Protes- 
tants. It is not by any means a flight of imagination to state 
that France, in certain provinces, still sutlers from the loss of 
her Huguenot citizens. To cite a given instance — Normandy, 
which in the fifteenth century was exceedingly prosperous, be- 
came devastated by the revocation of the Edict of Nantes. 
From 1815 to 1855 it improved, but since that time it has gone 
backward. 

Thus by gleaning here and there from history's pages do we 
gain some conception of the very bone and fibre of French 
character and industrial capacity, and while it was the agricul- 
turally inclined Huguenots who came to America in greatest 
number, the foregoing item throws an immense "spot light" 
on the economic school in which they received their training. 

One of the literary surprises, in connection with Huguenot 
dispersion, is to find a German work of seven volumes upon this 
subject; and one can readily appreciate German interest in and 
sympathy for the French Huguenots when we recall that the re- 
formers were first called Protestants in Germany. 

As the "in conclusion" paragraph of this article draws near, 
there are certain phases of the Huguenot religion which are 
entitled to comment before closing. 

We are living in an age which is witnessing the disintegration 
and decay of the stern Calvinistic doctrines of former days. 
The Catechism is also going into the discard, and it is not the 
intent of the writer to defend orthodox standards or deplore 



58 TRANSACTIONS 

their fallen estate; but one thing is certain, and thai is, that 
strong men were nurtured under those rigid doctrines -men of 
sterling character — men, whose names will be revered by future 
generations. Kindly, gracious women too were trained in the 
same school of church discipline — women, who knew that hos- 
pitality did not consist of ostentatious display and that charity 
became cold and bleak when divorced from personal interest. 

With all modern systems, cults, and "isms" we have no de- 
bate, but simply advise that their advocates give some attention 
to the cardinal principles of a religion which has enabled a verit- 
able "hand full" of people to occupy so many exalted seats in the 
councils of a great nation. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 59 

A CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION 

(Contributed by A. S. Salley, Jr., Esquire.) 

The following certificate of the naturalization of The Hugue- 
not refugees as citizens of England is recorded in Book 1672 
1692 of the Records of the Court of Ordinary of the Province 
of South Carolina, which is in the custody of The Historical 
Commission of South Carolina, on page 269. Two of the 
refugees so naturalized, Paul and Henry Bruneau, subsequently 
settled in South Carolina. (See Lisle ties Francois el Suisses 
and Translations, No. 10). 

"I Nicholas Heyward Notary and Tabellion Publique dwelling 
in London admitted and Sworne Doe hereby certifye and Attest 
unto all whom it may concern that I have seen & pused certaine 
Lres Pattents of Denization Granted by our gratious Soveraigne 
Lord King James the second under the broad Scale of England 
Dated the 20th day of March in the first yeare of his Maties 
Reigne wherein amongst others are incerted the names of Paul) 
Bruneau Josiah Marvilleau and Henry Bruneau who though 
borne beyond Sea are made his Maties Leige Subjects and to bee 
held reputed and taken as Subjects of the Kingdome of England, 
And as Such may purchase buy enjoye sell and Dispose of any 
Lands tenem ta or Hereditam" and that the said Paull Bruneau 
Josiah Marvilleau & Henry Bruneau by Vertue of the said Lre^ 
Pattents are to enjoye all Libertyes Priviledges and {franchises 
of a ffree Subject of this said Kingdome Without any disturbance 
impediment or Molestacon as by the said Lres Pattents relacon 
being thereunto had may more at large appeare, of all which 
Act being required of mee the said Notary I have granted these 
p r sents to serve & availe the said Paul Bruneau Josiah Marvil- 
leau & Henry Bruneau & every of them in tyme & place con- 
venient and as of right shall appertaine London the l Bl May 
Anno 1686/ 

In Testimonium veritatis Signo mei manual: 
Solito Signal et Tabellion et mei Sigilli apposui rogatus. 
(seale) Nic: Hayward Not* Pub" 



60 



TRANSACTIONS 



AN INTERESTING AND VALUABLE OLD RECORD 

The following is a copy of an original record appearing in 
an old Record Book from 1692 to 1700 (labelled "1692-93") 
in the office of the Probate Judge (formerly the Ordinary) of 
Charleston County, South Carolina:--- 

"Carolina, ss. 

"Wee whose names are hereunto subscribed doe promise to 
beare faith and true allegiance to our Soveraigne Lord King 
James the Second his heires and Successors and iidelitie and 
submission to the Lords Proprietors and the forme of Govern- 
ment by them established by their Fundamental! Constitution. 



1685 
October 



November 



6th 



19 



Joseph Morton 
John Godtrey 
Robt Quary Jr. 
Paull Grimball 
Ste: Bull 
John Farr 
Will: Dunlop 
Joseph Morton 



Oct: 



Barnard Schenckingh 
Humphrey Primatt 
Richard Conant 
Richard Baker 
Ben. Blake 



Oct. (?) 


6 


Jos: Oldys 






I doe hereby promise to 






William Popoll (?) 




Octob ro 


bare faith & true alliegi- 






I. Dugue 




19° 


ance to o r Soveraighne 






P.Bacot 




1686 


Lord King James y* 






Anthoin Poitevin (?) 






Second his ht-yres & 






1). Trczcvant 






Successors & udellity to 






P. Du tart re 






y c Lords Proprietors of 






Ren6 Rezeau 






Carolina according to y* 






Jno: (?) Alexander 






fundamental] Constitu- 






Jo. Hamilton 






tion dated y e xxi st July 


Octo: 


12 


James Gilbertson 






1669 




13 


Phin: Roger 






And: Percivall 




20 


I. Floury 




Jan ry 20th 


John Francis DeGignilliat 




31 


Adam Caslie (?) 




JOSS 








Augustin Girll6 (?) 




22 


George Pawley 




31 


Royer 
Gyles Russell 




Feb*y 14 

89 


Daniel! Carly 






Joseph Blake 




Ap: 13 


D. Hooglunt 






William Bower 












William Yelcr (?) 








N ov: ber2lth 




Peter DuMoulin 






, 


1686 












May 6tk 




William Brockkus 






















-*H 



V»»A 






j 



jz^f- &Jt*f, x /vV Of 'UtVjtJf-*J- 



iv* ^2*/6 '3>2^^? |bk^/ VTMHtiJ '** rr ***ft i ^. 

^ y HP** 9 * "?&%* 'xnpfiwi****.} 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 61 

The thirteen or more French Protestant or Huguenot sub- 
scribers to the above arc (1) Pierre or Peter Bacot, (2) Adam 
Caslie (?), (3) Jean Frangois de Gignilliat or John Francis 
Gignilliat, (4) Isaac or else Pierre or Peter du Gue or Dugue, 
(5) Augustin Girlie (?), (6) Pierre or Peter Du Moulin, (7) 
Pierre or Peter du Tartre or Dutartre, (8) Isaac Fleury, (9) 
Anthoine or Anthony Poitevin (?), (10) Rene Rezeau, (11) 
Phin. Roger (?), (12) Noe or Noel or Noah Royer, and (13) 
Daniel Trezeva'nt. 

The dates set opposite to the signatures of the subscribers 
would seem to indicate that they were in Carolina at the said 
respective dates. 

The foregoing print is a fac simile of the said original record, 
showing the original signatures of the subscribers thereto — the 
written memorandum, however, at the foot of the second page 
of the print, just below the name "D, Hooglunt," and read- 
ing from the bottom of the page up, has no connection what- 
ever with the promise of allegiance and its subjoined list of 
signatures (such written memorandum belonging to an old will 
of Edward Rawlins and continuing from another page of the 
Record Book). 



62 . TRANSACTIONS 

AN INTERESTING OLD DOCUMENT 

The subjoined extract from the Appendix to Wm. James 
Rivers' "Sketch of the History of South Carolina to the Close 
of the Proprietary Government by the Revolution of 1719" 
(page 447) is very interesting and valuable:— 

"S. P. 0. N°. Carolina, B. T., Vol. 3, p. 177 
From Charles Town in South Carolina. 

14 March, 1698-9. 

People 
The Number and quantity of the Erench Protestants, 

Refugees of the Erench Church of Charles Town, is 195 
The quantity of the Erench Protestants of the Erench 

Church of Goes* Creek, is 31 

The quantity of the French Protestants of y e Eastern 

branch of Cooper River,f is 101 

The number and quantity of the Erench Protestants of the 

Erench Church of Santee River, is Ill 

Total of the French Protestants to this day in 
Carolina, 438 

* * * * * * :1c * * * * * 

Per me 

Peter Girard." 

""Goose Creek, 

f' The Orange Quarter." 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 63 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE HUGUENOT 
SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA. 

CONSTITUTION 

Article I 

Name 

The name of this organization shall be "The Huguenot Society of South 
Carolina." , 

Article II 

Object 

The object of the Society shall be: 

Firstly, To perpetuate the memory and to foster and promote the principles 
and virtues of the Huguenots. 

Secondly, To publicly commemorate at stated times the principal events in the 
history of the Huguenots. 

Thirdly, To discover, collect and preserve all still existing documents, mon- 
uments, etc., relating to the genealogy or history of the Huguenots of America in 
general, and to those of South Carolina in particular. 

Fourthly, To gather by degrees a library for the use of the Society, composed 
of all obtainable books, monographs, pamphlets, manuscripts, etc., relating to the 
Huguenots. 

Fifthly, To cause statedly to be prepared and read before the Society, papers, 
essays, etc., on Huguenot history or genealogy and collateral subjects. 

Article III 

Membership 

Section 1. The membership of this Society shall be as follows: 

Firstly, All descendants in the direct male or female lines of the Huguenots fam- 
ilies which emigrated to America prior to the promulgation of the Edict of Tolera- 
tion, November 28, 1787. 

Secondly, Representatives of other French families, whose profession of the 
Protestant Faith is anterior to the promulgation of the Edict of Toleration, 
November 28, 1787. 

Thirdly, Pastors of French Huguenots congregations in South Carolina. 

Fourthly, Writers who have made the history, genealogy, principles, etc., of the 
Huguenots a special subject of study and research, to whatever nationality they 
may belong. 

Section 2. The members of the Society may consist of three classes: Resi- 
dent, Corresponding and Honorary; but the rights and privileges of each class 
shall be the same. 

Section 3. The annual fees of Resident and Corresponding members shall 
be one dollar, and the payment of twenty dollars shall constitute one a life mem- 
ber. All dues shall be paid in advance. 



64 TRANSACTIONS 

Section 4. The funds of this Society shall be applied only to the furtherance 
and realization of the objects contemplated in 1 his constitution. 

Section 5. All life-membership fees shall be invested by the Executive Com- 
mittee (hereinafter provided for) in the name of the Society, and only the interest 
arising therefrom shall be used for the purposes of the Society. 

Section 6. Application for membership, with a statement of the name, ad- 
dress, profession, and descent of the applicant, shall be made in writing to the 
Executive Committee, who shall report thereon at the next meeting of the Society. 
If their report be favorable, the candidate shall be considered as duly elected; but 
if demanded, the election shall be by ballot, and a two-thirds vote of the members 
present shall be necessary to elect. Every application for membership shall be 
accompanied by one year's dues. 

Article IV 
Officers 

Section 1. The officers of the Society shall consist of a President, a Vice- 
President for each original Huguenot centre or settlement in South Carolina, a 
Secretary and Treasurer, an Historian; and an Executive Committee composed 
of the President, Vfce-President, the Secretary and Treasurer, the Historian, and 
five members elected by the Society, and. all ex-Presidents of the Society shall be 
advisory members of said Committee with all the privileges of members except the 
right to vote. 

Section 2. Besides the ordinary rights and duties of a presiding officer, the ■ 
President shall appoint the places of meeting; in conjunction with the Secretary 
and Treasurer he shall have the power, and upon the written request of five mem- 
bers it shall be his duty, to call special meetings of the Society, and he shall sign 
all drafts drawn on the Treasurer. 

Section 3. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Presidents to interest in the objects 
of this Society the Huguenots of the localities which they represent; in the absence 
of the President of this Society, a Vice-President shall preside and exercise all the 
rights and privileges of the President; and if more than one Vice-President be pres- 
ent, the senior Vice-President in attendance shall be the presiding officer. 

Section 4. It shall be the duty of the Secretary and Treasurer to keep an ac- 
curate record of all the proceedings of the Society and of the Executive Committee; 
to conduct the correspondence of the Society; to notify members of the meetings of 
the Society; to inform officers and new members of their election. 

It shall also be his duty to collect all dues, fees and other moneys belonging to 
the Society, and to deposit the same in some bank in the City of Charleston in the 
name of the Society. Out of the^e sums he shall pay such sums only as may be 
ordered by the Society through its President, or the Executive Committee. He 
shall keep an accurate account of its receipts and disbursements, and render an 
account of the same at each annual meeting of the Society, which shall name a 
committee to audit them. Eor his services he shall be allowed ten per centum of 
all amounts collected by him. 

Section 5. It shall be the duty of the Historian to have in his keeping all books, 
pamphlets, manuscripts, etc., pertaining or belonging to the Society, and to re- 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OP SOUTH CAROLINA 65 

ceive and collect data relating to the History of the Huguenots before and since 
their settlement in America. 

Section 6. It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee to examine and 
pass upon the credentials of candidates; to invest and manage the funds of the 
Society, to engage suitable persons to deliver the addresses and prepare the papers 
contemplated in this constitution, and to make all other arrangements necessary 
for the meetings of the Society and to transact all business of the Society not other- 
wise provided for in the constitution. 

Section 7. The officers of the Society shall be annually elected at the anni- 
versary meeting; but if any vacancy occur during the year the Executive Committee 
shall have power to appoint a member of the Society to fill such vacancy for the 
unexpired term. 

Article V 
Meetings 

This Society shall hold two regular meetings each year and, in accordance with 
the purpose of the Society, the said meetings shall take place on the following 
historical dates: 

Section 1. The Anniversary Meeting shall be held on April 13, the day of 
the Promulgation of the Edict of Nantes, granting Freedom of Worship to the 
Huguenots of France. 

Section 2. The Autumn Meeting of the Society shall be held on the 22nd of 
October, the date of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. 

Section 3. The Executive Committee shall have power to arrange for a dinner, 
or other collation, annually, as they may deem most appropriate. 

Section 4. In case any of these dates should fall upon a day inconvenient for 
the proper celebration thereof, the Executive Committee shall appoint for the 
meeting the next most convenient day. 

BY-LAWS 

Section t. Notices of meetings shall be given at least one week in advance. 
Section 2. It shall always require fifteen members to constitute a quorum for 
the transactions of business. 

Section 3. At all meetings of the Society the order of business shall be as follows: 
Prayer. 

1. The reading and adopting of the minutes of the previous meeting. 

2. Reports of officers. 

3. Reports of the Executive Committee. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Reports of special committees. 

6. Miscellaneous business. 

7. Election of officers. 

8. The reading of papers or delivery of addresses before the Society. 

9. Adjournment. 

Section 4. All resolutions must be presented in writing to the Chair. 



66 TRANSACTIONS 

Section 5. If any member neglect, or refuse to pay his annual fee for two con- 
secutive years the Treasurer shall report his name to the Executive Committee, 

who may strike his name from the roll of membership. 

Section 6. Such members of the Society as do not themselves bear Huguenot 
names shall add to their own names (on signing the constitution) the Huguenot 

names through which they claim descent. 

Section 7. The original Huguenot settlements in this State, earh one of which 
is entitled to a vice-president, are as follows: Charleston, Purysburg and X«. ■'. 
Bordeaux. 

Section 8. The' Constitution and By-Laws of this Society may be amended 
or repealed at any meeting of the Society by a two-thirds vote; but the changes 
proposed must have been submitted at a previous meeting. The)' may also be 
amended or repealed by a vote of a majority of all the members of the Executive 
Committee at any meeting during the recess of the Society: Provided, the amend- 
ment so adopted shall be confirmed at the next meeting of the Society. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 67 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE SOCIETY 

Transactions No. 1. Published in 1889. 

An account of the organization of the Society in 1885. 

List of charter members. 

List of officers, 1885 to 1889. 

Memorial to Genl. Wilmot G. deSaussure, late president of the Society. 

Short sketches of the lives of late members. 

President Daniel Ravenel's Anniversary Address. 

Address by Wm. St. Julien Jervey, Esq., delivered at the Anniversary Meet- 
ing, April 13/1889. 
Transactions No. 2. Published in 1889. 

An historical sermon delivered at the French Protestant Church, on Sun- 
day, April 13, 1890, by the Rev. Charles S. Vedder, D.D., Pastor; with 
picture of Church and list of Pastors from 1C86 to 1890. 

Proceedings of the Anniversary Meeting, April 14,1890. 

List of officers and new members. 

Ivry, a poem by Rev. C. S. Vedder, D.D. 

An address before the Society by lion. Thomas F. Bayard. 
Transactions No. 3. Published in 1894. 

Report of President Wm. St. Julien Jervey, at Anniversary Meeting, April 13, 
1891, and list of officers of the Society. 

President's Address at Anniversary Meetings of 1893 and 1894. 

List of officers and list of members elected since 1890. 

Short sketches of the lives of deceased members. 

An address before the Society, on the Early Huguenots and their Emigration 
to America, by Gabriel E. Manigault, M.I). 
Transactions No. 4. Published in 1897. 

Papers on some Early Huguenot Families in South Carolina: a, The Legare 
Family; b, The Huger Family, with pedigree; c, The Marion Family; 
d, The Manigault Family from 1665 to 1886, with portraits. 

A paper on the Huguenot Influence in Colonial South Carolina, by Rev. Robt. 
Wilson, D.D. 

Sketches of the lives of late deceased members of the Society. 
Transactions No. 5. Published in 1898. 

The First Huguenot Immigrants from 1670 to 16S0, 1680 to 1690, 1690 to 1700. 

Hostility of the English Settlers to the French. 

Naturalization of Huguenot Refugees. 

List of names of French and Swiss Huguenots Refugees in Carolina. 

Character of the Huguenots. 

The Huguenot Church in South Carolina; St. John's Parish, Berkley; St. 
Denis' Parish, "Orange Quarter;" Settlement and Church on Santee River. 

The Huguenots of Abbeville, S. C. 

Founding of the South Carolina Society of Charleston. 

Notices of Conspicuous Members of the Gaillard Family. 



68 TRANSACTIONS 

Transactions No. 6. Published in 1899. 

An Historical Sketch of the Prioleau Family in Europe and America, with 
illustrations, by Rev. Robt. Wilson, D.I)., and Gabriel Manigault, M.D. 

The Ravenel Family in France and America, by Daniel Ravenel, Sr. 

Necrology 1896-1897. 
Transactions No. 7. Published in 1900. 

Proceedings of the Fifteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, April 21, 
1900. 

List of oflicers. 

An Historical Sketch of the Huguenot Congregations of South Carolina: 
French Santee; Orange Quarter; St. John's, Berkley; the Church at Charles- 
ton: etc. — by the late Daniel Ravenel, of Charleston, with notes by the late 
Gen. Wilmot G. DeSaussure, of Charleston. 
Transactions No. 8. Published in 1901. 

Proceedings of the Sixteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, April 13, 
1901. 

Anniversary address of President Robert Wilson, D.D. 

Resume of Transactions, 1897 to 1901. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 

List of members with names of original Huguenot Families from whom de- 
scended. 

Letter from the Honorable Alfred linger, upon the death of Mr. Petigru. 

A Narrative of the Life and Services of Francis G. DeLieseline during the 
War of the American Revolution, contributed by Dr. Wm. C. Ravenel. 
Transactions No. 9. Published in 1902. 

Minutes of the Seventeenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, April 17, 1902. 

The President's address. 

An address on the Early Huguenots, delivered before the Society by Col. Rich- 
ard L. Maury, of Richmond, Va. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 

Enlarged and revised list of members, with name or names of persons from 
whom I hey derive their descent. 
Transactions No. 10. Published in 1903. 

Minutes of the Eighteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held April 15, 
1903. 

List of oflicers. 

The President's Address. 

Report of officers. 

Some wills of South Carolina Huguenots; copies in original French, with trans- 
lations in English. 

A paper, entitled The Fluguenots in Dublin, by Rev. Robt. Wilson, D.D. 
Transactions No. 11. Published in 1904. 

Minutes of the Nineteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held April 
13, 1904. 

Anniversary Address of President Robert Wilson. 

A brief memorial to Francis Marion. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 69 

"The Huguenots of South Carolina," an Address before the Society, by Mr. 
Thomas VV. Bacot. 

Some wills of South Carolina Huguenots; copies in original French, with trans- 
lations in English; with comments by Rev. Robert Wilson, D.I). Con 
tinued from No. 10. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 
Transactions No. 12. Published in 1905. 

Minutes of the Twentieth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held April 
13, 1905. 

List of officers. , 

Report of officers. 

The President's Anniversary Address. 

Huguenot Immigration in South Carolina by Henry A. DeSaussure, Esq. 

A Short Story of Three Brothers, by Ida H. Layard. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 
Transactions No. 13. Published in 1906. 

Minutes of the Twenty-first Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held April 
' 20, 1906. 

List of officers. 

Report of officers. 

Anniversary Address of President. 

'The French Protestant Church, Paper read by Miss Ravenel, 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

Upper Beat of St. John's, Berkeley, by late Prof. F. A. Porcher. 

Antoine Gabeau, by Miss Willis. 

Additional Data on Cordes Family. Maj. J. J. Lucas and 1). E. Huger Smith, 
Esq. 

Old Document on Bruneau Family. Mr. A. S. Salley, jr. 

Notes from Crottet MSS. 
Transactions No. 14. Published in 1907. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of Twenty-second Anniversary Meeting. 

Report of officers. 

The President's Address. 

Huguenots on Santee River, by the late Henry A. DeSaussure. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots, Editorial Notes. 

Dr. J. L. E. W. Shecut, Miss Eola Willis. 

Ribault's Fort, Miss Isabelle DeSaussure. 

Notes on Gaillard Family. 

Letter from Benj. Mazyck to Capt. Daniel Ravenel, dated June 28, 1776. 

List of members. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 
Transactions No. 15. Published in 1908. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of the Twenty-third Anniversary Meeting. 



70 TRANSACTIONS 

Treasurer's Statement. 

Report of Historian. 

The President's Anniversary Address. 

Poem. The Bretons. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

Editorial Notes. 

Notice of Rene Ravenel, Immigrant. 

The Last of the Huguenots. Stephen Thomas. 

The Isle of Oleron. M. M. de Richmond and M. Paul Thomas. 

List of members, revised. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 
Transactions' No. 16. Published in 1909. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of Twenty-fourth Anniversary Meeting- 
Reports of officers. 

The President's Anniversary Address. 

Wills of South Carolina LIuguenots. 

The State of French Protestants after 1685. 

Correspondence relative to gift to Society of site of Old Goose Creek French 
Church. 

Plats showing site of old Goose Creek French Church. 

The French Huguenot Church of the Parish of St. James, Goose Creek. 

List of members, revised. 
Transactions No. 17. Published in 1910. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of Twenty-fifth Anniversary Meeting. 

Reports of officers. 

The President's Annual Address. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

The Huguenots in America. By Hon. A. T. Clearwater. 

Notes on Theodore Sompayrac. 

Letter concerning Rev. Mons. Pouderous. 

Huguenot Lineage of Frroll II. Colcock. 

Book Notices: "Les Freres Gibeit." The Journal of American History, Vol. 
XIX, No. HI, 3d Quarter. 

List of members. 
Transactions No. 18. Published in 191 1 . 

List of officers. 

Minutes of Twenty-sixth Anniversary Meeting. 

Reports of officers. 

The President's Anniversary Address. 

Account of Porcher Family, by Mrs. Wickham. 

Book Noticesr— La Reforme dans LTsle D'Oleron, Par Paul Thomas, Capaci- 
taire en Droit. Ouvrage Orn6 de onze illustrations. Lezay. Imprimerie- 
Libraire H. Canon. 1911. 



INDEX 



Uldress of the President 

Address of Prof. Yates Sriowden 

An Interesting and Valuable Old Record I Promise of \ll<-uian< - ey 

\n Interesting Old Document 

Application Blank •. 

Hy-Laws of Society 

Certificate of Naturalization 

Constitution of Society 

Deaths, 1914 1915 

Kssay by Dr. J. G. B. Bulloch 

Kssay by O. B. DuBois, Esq 

Executive Committee's Report, 1915 

Historian's Report, 1915 

Minutes of Anniversary Meeting. 1915 ....'. 

New Members, 1914-1915 

Notes of Information to Members, etc 

Officers, 1915-1916.. 

Piint of Old Promise of Allegiance 

Publications of Society 

Treasurer's Report 



'"* 



J'.l 


P 




9 


I9- 


30 


60 


61 


Im 


lex 


65 


-66 




59 


63- 


65 




11 


50 


45 


45- 


5 l < 


10 


12 


14 


15 


6-S 


6 7 




5 




5 


60-61 


67- 


-71 




15 



TRANSACTIONS 

OF THE 

Huguenot Society 

OF 

South Carolina 
No. 22 

PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY 




(INCORPORATED JUNE 21, 1909) 



CHARLESTON, S. C. 
1916 



NOTES 

The Huguenot Society is not local in its scope, its member- 
ship including persons of approved Huguenot descent from ail 
parts of the world. 

Every member is urged to use the application in the back of 
this book, and secure for the Society a new member. 



Certificates of Membership will be mailed to members immedi- 
ately after their election. 



The Society Pins or Badges may be obtained by members 
from the Secretary, postage free, at the rate of $2.50 for those 
enameled on silver, or $4.50 for those enameled on gold. The 
Pin represents the Seal of the Society and is about the size of a 
quarter of a dollar. 



Owing to the large increase in membership in the past two or 
three years and the demand from libraries in various parts of the 
world several numbers of the " Transactions" of the Society have 
become exhausted, and we are anxious to obtain copies of the 
following numbers, 1, 3, 4, 7, 8, 13. 17, 18, 1 ( ). 

The Society would appreciate gifts of any of these numbers. 



Members of the Society are earnestly requested to notify the 
Secretary of change in residence and post office address, and change 
of name by marriage—also, of any deaths of members, which may 
come to their knowledge. 



OFFICERS 1916-1917 

President 

THOMAS W. BACOT 

29 Broad Street 
Charleston, S. C. 

Vice-Presidents 

For Charleston— WM. C. MILLER 
For Purysburg— DAVID HUGUENIN 
For New Bordeaux— CHAS. P. ALLSTON 

Secretary and Treasurer 

DANIEL RAVENEL 

54 Broad Street 
Charleston, S. C. 

Historian 
WM. G. MAZYCK 

Executive Committee 

DR. T. GRANGE SIMONS 

C. BISSELL JENKINS 
ALFRED HUGER 
SAMUEL G. STONEY 

D. E. HUGER SMITH 



The President, Vice-Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer, and 
Historian are ex officio members of the Executive Committee — and 
all ex-Presidents are advisory members. 



,£>k- 



MINUTES 

Charleston, S. C, April 14, 1916. 

The Thirty-first Anniversary Meeting of the Huguenot Soci- 
ety of South Carolina was held at the hall of the South Carolina 
Society tins afternoon at five o'clock. The meeting was opened 
with a prayer by the Reverend Florian Vurpillot. 

The Secretary read the minutes of the last Anniversary 
Meeting which were confirmed. 

The President then read his annual report, and also the re- 
port of the Executive Committee. 

The Historian read his report, and the Treasurer read his 
annual statement. All these reports were ordered spread upon 
the minutes. 

Messrs. Eugene N. Simons and T. H. Willis were named a 
committee to audit the Treasurer's accounts. 

The Committee, appointed at the last meeting to try and se- 
cure space in the Charleston Library for the books of the Hugue- 
not Society, reported that they were unable to make any arrange- 
ments whatever with the Charleston Library, owing to lack of 
room. The President stated that it was probable that some 
arrangements could be made with the Charleston Chamber of 
Commerce, and on motion he named the following committee 
to take the matter up with the Chamber of Commerce, and re- 
port to the Executive Committee as soon as they could, viz., 
Messrs. C. Bissell Jenkins, William C. Miller, and William G. 
Mazyck. 

On motion the following resignations were accepted: Miss 
Kate C. Waties, Miss M. Legare OTIear, Mrs. Chas. P. Henry, 
Mrs. W. D. Long, Mr. W. D. Long, Mr. W. Ballard Long, 
Miss Louise S. Burton. 

Upon the recommendation of the Executive Committee, one 
hundred and thirty-eight (138) new members w r ere unanimously 
elected. (See list in Report of Executive Committee at page 1 1 
post) 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 7 

Dr. T. Grange Simons offered the following resolution, which 
was unanimously adopted: 

Resolved, That consideration of all pending amendments to 
the Constitution and By-Laws be postponed to a special meet- 
ing to be held for the purpose on the fourth Monday in May, 
1916. 

Dr. T. Grange Simons offered the following resolution, which 
was unanimously adopted: 

Resolved, That, as recommended by the Executive Committee, 
the Society hereby endorses the work of Dr. A. If. Hirsch, en- 
titled "History of The Huguenots in South Carolina," and 
urges its members individually to buy the book when published. 

Mr. John P. Thomas made a motion that the chair appoint 
a committee of three to suggest officers for the ensuing year, 
which was adopted, and the Chair appointed the following: 
J. P. Thomas, Wilmot D. Porcher, and W. C. Wilbur. 

The Committee suggested the following officers: 

Thomas W. Bacot, President. 

Win. C. Miller, Vice President for Charleston. 

David Huguenin, Vice President for Purysburg. 

Chas. P. Allston, Vice President for New Bordeaux. 

Daniel Pavenel, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Wm. G. Mazyck, Historian. 

Executive Committee, Dr. T. Grange Simons, Messrs. C. Bis- 
sell Jenkins, Alfred linger, Samual G. Stoney, D. E. Huger 
Smith. 

The Committee's suggestions were accepted, and the said offi- 
cers unanimously elected. 

The President then introduced the Honorable Alexander R. 
Law ton of Savannah, Ga., who delivered a very able address 
which was greatly enjoyed by all the members present. 

At the close of the address the President asked Mr. Lawton 
for his manuscript, in order that it may be published in the 
forthcoming Transactions of the Society. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned. 

After the meeting, a collation was served. 

Daniel Ravenel, Secretary. 



B TRANSACTIONS 

THE PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

April 14, 1916. 

Fellow -members of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, Ladies 
and Gentlemen: 

We are to be felicitously congratulated upon the flourishing 
condition of our Society, the membership of which has increased 
more than a hundred-fold since the last anniversary meeting, 
as the Report of the Executive Committee will show — it is a 
fact that it is the largest Huguenot Society in the world today — 
its members numbering five hundred and sixty-six. Interest 
in the Society and its Transactions is wide-spread throughout 
this country especially, and grows more and more under the 
stimulus of its motto, " Religion, Freedom, and Truth." 

Let me read the following extracts from a letter of April 3, 
1916, received by me from Mrs. Caroline Dupuy Bassett of 
Windsor, Mo., one of our oldest and most enthusiastic members: 

"I have sent Mr. Ravenel nine applications this winter and 
spring, and one last summer — ten in all — and hope to send one 
or two more before the 13th, your Anniversary Meeting. 

"On the 14th, 1 celebrate my 78th birthday, and hope to do more 
next year for the Society than I have been able to the past year. 

"I was delighted to hear of the large increase in the member- 
ship in the last ten months — my sincere wish is that the mem- 
bership may be doubled in another year. 

u \ enjoy 'Transactions' very much indeed, and regret I 
did not know of the Society when it was founded 1885 — then 
I could have had all the Nos. of 'Transactions,' and perhaps 
could have secured many, many more members for the grandest 
Society in America. 

"With all good wishes for your success in the noble work in 
which you are engaged, I am, 

Very sincerely yours," 

How encouraging and inspiring such words, and not words 
alone but deeds of this "Ancient Lady" and gentle and loyal 
Huguenot! 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 9 

And also let me read from a recent enthusiastic letter of Mrs. 
Mary Wilson Barnet of Chicago, who signs herself "in the 
Huguenot bond." 

Jn my last address I mentioned the probability of the adop- 
tion by the Carolina, Atlantic & Western Railway Co. (now the 
Seaboard Air Line Railway Co.) of the name " Jamestown" for 
its railway station which is very near the site of old Jamestown 
of " French Santee" and which had been named "Wren" — it is 
now with very great gratification and pride that I can say to 
you, "C'est un fait accompli" 

Our sincere thanks are justly due to Mr. W. R. Bonsai, Vice- 
President, and to Mr. Charles R. Capps, First Vice-President 
of the Seaboard Air Line Railway Company, not only for acced- 
ing to our request and suggestion but especially for their lively 
interest in the matter as an historical one and the hearty spirit 
with which they entered into and effected it. 

In fruition of the hope and expectation, expressed in my 
address of last year, you will be glad to know that, through 
the great courtesy and kindness of Mr. Fred G. Davies in 
carrying by automobile Judge H. A. M. Smith and Mr. D. E. 
Huger Smith and myself to the " Orange Quarter" in the Parish 
of St. Thomas and St. Denis, the site of the old French Protes- 
tant or Huguenot Church there has been located with sufficient 
exactness to justify the Society in erecting a monument to per- 
petuate such site, as has heretofore been done in the case of the 
site of the old French Protestant or Huguenot Church in the 
Parish of St. James, Goose Creek — without the assistance of 
Judge Smith (to whom we can not forget that we are indebted 
for the ownership of the Goose Creek "God's acre") and also 
of Mr. D. E. Huger Smith and of Mr. Davies, such result would 
have been difficult to accomplish. Before our thirty-second 
anniversary meeting comes around, let us hope that the site of 
the old French Protestant or Huguenot Church in St. John's, 
Berkley, Parish can and will be located and be reported for a 
similar memorial. 

May our future keep pace with our past! 



10 TRANSACTIONS 

REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The Executive Committee reports as follows: 

Transactions No. 21 (1915) have been issued, and every mem- 
ber of the Society has been sent a copy thereof. Copies have 
also been sent to fifty of the largest libraries in the United 
States. Interesting material is in hand for succeeding Trans- 
actions, and resumption of publication of Wills of Huguenots 
and also of Lisjt of Members (showing the names of original Hu- 
guenot families from which they descend) is in contemplation. 

The Committee is delighted to report that in response to the 
letter of the Society's President to President Wilson (referred 
to in the Committee's Report of last year and supplemented 
by personal interview) the name "Culebra Cut," Panama 
Isthmian Canal, has been changed by an Executive Order to 
"Gaillard Cut," in recognition of the successful services of the 
late Colonel David du Bose GailJard, U. S. A., who from July, 
1908, to the date of his death on December 5, 1913, was Divi- 
sion Engineer, Central Division (including that Cut), Isthmian 
Canal. 

The Society at its last anniversary meeting referred to the 
Executive Committee, with power to act, the matter of the 
publication of Dr. A. H. Hirsch's " History of the Huguenots in 
South Carolina." The Committee has given careful and 
earnest consideration of this matter, for Dr. Hirsch's work is a 
fine literary production, skillfully conceived and arranged, rich 
in very valuable material, and well worthy of publication, and 
ought to be in the hands of every Huguenot family — but on 
account of the expenses of publication, which are more than 
Dr. Hirsch can and should himself bear, the Committee, though 
having power, is uncertain how to act and is of the opinion that 
the Society itself should act in the matter; and so the Com- 
mittee recommends that the Society endorse the work and 
urge its' members individually to buy the book when published. 

The following applicants for membership in the Society are 
favorably reported: 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAEOL1NA 11 

Adams, Arthur Hartford, Conn. 

Bacot, Miss Flora Mclver Charleston, S. C. 

Bacot, Miss Louise W Charleston, S. C. 

Bacot, Daniel Norborne Charleston, S. C. 

Barnet, Mrs. James B Chicago, 111. 

Bassett, Dr. Samuel T St. Louis, Mo. 

Bassett, Paul A Waterloo, Iowa 

Benry, Mrs. Helen C Macdonald, W. Va. 

Bennett, Mrs. Susan S Charleston, S. C. 

Blackburn, Mrs. George A Columbia, S. C. 

Blackshear, Miss Anna Baber Macon, Ga. 

Blackshear, Miss Mary Baber Macon, Ga. 

Bonneau, Miss Marguerite Clemson College, S. C. 

Boyd, Mrs. Mary R. C Yatesville, S. C. 

Brown, Dr. William S.. Charleston, S. C. 

Butler, Mrs. M. C New York, N. Y. 

Brunson, Miss Sophia B St. Matthews, S. C. 

Carlisle, Mrs. H. B Spartanburg, S. C. 

Charles, R. Keith Timmonsville, S. C. 

Child, Mrs. Jesse, Richmond, Mo. 

Cockrell, Mrs. Minnie W Louisville, Ky. 

Coleman, Mrs. W. H. Columbia, S. C. 

Cole, Charles L., Jr Minneapolis, Minn. 

Collins, Miss Phyllis Charleston, W. Va. 

Conlon,Mrs. John J Hannibal, Mo. 

Crow, Mrs. Madison San Antonio, Tex. 

Dargan, George Edwin Darlington, S. C. 

Dargan, A. S Darlington, S. C. 

Davis, Mrs. E. M. A Lexington, Mo. 

deVane, Miss Lillian Red Springs, N. C. 

DeSaussure, Dr. II. W Charleston, S. C. 

Downing, Mrs. George C Frankfort, Ky. 

DuBostf, Allison P Fasley, S. C. 

DuBois, Orin B .Weehawken, N. J. • 

Elliott, Miss Annie Huger Washington, D. C. 

Eliott, Miss Kate Washington, D. C. 

Flikinger, Mrs. Louis Little Rock, Ark. 

Gaillard, Peter C Fergueson, S. C. 

Gayle, Mrs. E. O Shreveport, La. 

Geiger, Mrs. D. D Huntington, W. Va. 

Gibert, Paul Carrington Augusta, Ga. 

Guerard, Albert Sidney Asheville, N. C. 

Guerry, DuPont Greenville, S. C. 

Guerry, Edgar Lynne El Paso, Tex. 

Hall, William S Hannibal, Mo. 

Halsey, Mrs. D. S Charleston, S. C. 

Hamacher, Mrs. Mary Bassett Kansas City, Mo. 



12 TRANSACTIONS 

Harris, Graham II Chicago, 111. 

Harvin, J. Bates Charleston, S. C. 

Harvin, Stephen T Charleston, S. C. 

Henley, Miss Elizabeth W. D New York, N. Y. 

Henderson, Walter F Fulton, Mo. 

Hillhouse, Miss Susan J ! Calhoun, Ga. 

Hocker, Miss Willie K Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Hodges, Mrs. James B Spartanburg, S. C. 

Howe, Gedney M Charleston, S. C. 

Hunt, Gaillard Washington, D. C. 

Kaminski, Mrs. E. S Georgetown, S. C. 

Keirn, Miss" Julia M .Philadelphia, Pa. 

King, Mrs. Ernest W Charleston, S. C. 

Kinzie, John H Charleston, S. C. 

Kirk, W. M. F Charleston, S. C. 

Kirk, F. de L. Charleston, S. C. 

Kirk, Mrs. L. L Charleston, S. C. 

Knight, Gerald B Wayeross, Ga. 

LaCoste, Miss G. C Warrenton, N. C. 

Lebby, Mrs. S. Lee Charleston, S. C. 

Lewis, H. Latone Washington, D. C. 

Long, Mrs. W. W Clemson College, S. C. 

Lucas, Mrs. Grange S Santee, S. C. 

Lyons, Mrs. P. M Memphis, Tenn. 

Martin, Benjamin, Jr Muskogue, Okla. 

Mastin, Mrs. George R Lexington, Ky. 

Mastin, Miss Lamar Lexington, Ky. 

Matthews, Mrs. J. W Spartanburg, S. C. 

Meserole, C. V Englewood, N. J. 

Mikell, Franklin T New York, N. Y. 

Mixon, Mrs. Robert M Williston, S. C. 

Moreland, Miss Caroline Charleston, S. C. 

Moreland, Rt. Rev. William Hall Sacremento, Cal. 

McGue, Mrs. M. L. C Charleston, S. C. 

McKeithan, Mrs. S. A Darlington, S. C. 

Nelson, Mrs. Richard Adams Williamson, W. Va. 

Norwood, S. W Marion, S. C. 

Palmer, Philip G Summerville, S. C. 

Pettigrew, Miss Alice L Catonsville, Md. 

Peelle, Mrs. Stanton C Chevy Chase, Md. 

Player, James Y St. Louis, Mo. 

Player, James Y., Jr San Antonio, Tex. 

Player, George P Jefferson City, Mo. 

Player, Tompson T. Houston, Tex. 

Porcher, Lieut. C. G Mobile, Ala. 

Price, Mrs. Irene W Harrogate, Tenn. 

Quin, Mrs. Percy E Washington, D. C. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 13 

Ravenel, Miss Annie S Tryon, N. C. 

Rheams, Mrs. Edna P. II Kenner, La. 

Robert, Dr. J. C Centreville, Miss. 

Sampson, Miss S. M. L Georgetown, S. C. 

Savage, Mrs. W. L Philadelphia, Pa. 

Scarpa, Mrs. E. S. F Charleston, S. C. 

Seviers, Miss Rosa V Tallulah, La. 

Seviers, Mrs. Robert Versailles, Ky. 

Sharkey, Mrs. Robert W Florence, S. C. 

Scull, Mrs. G. H New York, N. Y. 

Scruggs, Mrs. Martha 'Watkins Kansas City, Mo. 

Schmeltzer, Mrs. II. R San Antonio, Tex. 

Smith, Miss Edith W Denver, Col. 

Smith, John Palmer Charleston, S. C. 

Steedman, Charles R Providence, R. I. 

Stoney, Miss Louisa McCord Charleston, S. C. 

Stoney, Miss Harriet Porcher Charleston, S. C. 

Stoney, Augustin T. S Charleston, S. C. 

Sublette, Dr. S. O Versailles, Ky. 

Sylvan, Mrs. J. B Columbia, S. C. 

Taylor, Mrs. Lena P . . Shawhan, Ky. 

Taylor. George W Demopolis, Ala. 

Terrell, Mrs. W. E Holden, Mo. 

Thomas, Miss Annie E Charleston, S. C. 

Thomas, J. Waties Columbia, S. C. 

Tyler, Lyons G Williamsburg, Va. 

Van de Sande-Bakuyzen, Mrs. Adrian New York, N. Y. 

Ward, Mrs. Samuel M Georgetown, S. C. 

Watson, Mrs. A. Briggs Beaufort, S. C. 

Weathersbee, Mrs. M. F Williston, S. C. 

Wienges, O. II .... St. Matthews, S. C. 

Winges, Frederick T St. Matthews, S. C. 

Whitman, Edward Bostick Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wilds, John L ] Chicago, 111. 

Williams, Mrs. Arthur M. Georgetown, S. C. 

Williams, Trezevant Washington, D. C. 

Wilson, W. W . Savannah, Ga. 

Wilson, Mrs. M. S Boston, Mass. 

Witherspoon, Warren V ; Lexington, Ky. 

Woodson, Matthew . Middleboro, Ky. 

Woodson, Henry N Kansas City, Mo. 

Woodson, E. Dupuy Pineville, Ky. 

Woodson, Grattan C Middleboro, Ky. 

Yates, Miss Elizabeth W Columbia, S. C. 



14 TRANSACTIONS 

The following is a list of the resignations: 

Mrs. Charles P. Henry. 
Miss Kate C. Waties. 
Miss M. L. OTlear. 
Mrs. W. D. Long. 
Mr. W. D. Long. 
Mr. W. Ballard Long. 
Miss Louise S. Burton. 

The deaths since the last annual meeting are as follows: 

Miss Arabella Mazyck. 

Mr. Stephen Thomas. 

Dr. J. Bachman Chisolm (an Honorary Member). 

Mrs. E. C. Legare. 

Rev. F. A. De Rosset. 

Miss Eleanor Porcher Ravenel. 

Mr. Edw. P. Guerard, Jr. 

Mr. W. E. Bonneau. 

During the past year we have received the above 138 appli- 
cations, on which action is taken at this meeting. While we have 
lost through death and resignation and have dropped for non-pay- 
ment of dues 23, our net gain is 1 15, making the total membership 
of the Society 566. 

From the latest lists sent us of our two sister Societies, The 
Huguenot Society of America and The Huguenot Society of 
London, it seems that our Society now has a membership of 
more than the combined membership of our said two sister 
Societies. 

T. W. Bacot, President, 
Chairman of Executive Committee. 

April 14, 1916. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 15 

STATEMENT 

of 
Daniel Ravenel, Treasurer, for the year ending April 14, 1916 

Receipts 
1915 
April 13 

To balance from last year $493 .81 

To members dues April 13, 1915-April 14, 1916 553 . 35 

To sale of Transactions 1 5 . 50 

To sale of badges 54. 15 

To interest on permanent fund for year 18.48 

To donation 4.00 



$1,139.29 

Disbursements 
1915 
April 13 

By paid for collation Annual Meeting $40 00 

By paid balance on a/c Transactions Number 20 68 . 24 

By paid rent of hall Annual Meeting 7 . 00 

By paid Society Badges 37 . 50 

By paid books purchased 3 . 65 

By paid Dr. Bulloch for Prize Essay 25 . 00 

By paid daily papers for advertising 5 . 30 

By paid flowers to funerals of deceased members 2.50 

By paid printing and stationery 28 . 85 

By paid postage, telegrams and express 83 .00 

By paid typewriting . . .".. 31 .00 

By paid expense of Dr. Snowden to Charleston (>.40 

By paid trip to St. Thomas and St. Denis 2.00 

By paid printing Transactions Number 21 174 . 54 

By paid exchange on checks 1 . 00 

By paid commission to treasurer on $635.48 collected 63.54 

• ' $580.52 

Balance 

Permanent fund $494. 15 

General fund 64.62 $558.77 

$1,139.29 



16 TRANSACTIONS 

PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED BY THE HUGUENOT 

SOCIETY 

From April 13, 1915, to April 13, 1916 

The Washington Historical Quarterly, Seattle, Washington. 

Transactions No. 4, No. 7, No. 8, No. 13, No. 17, No. 18, No. 19 (Misses Porcher). 

Library of Congress Washington Papers. 

Kungl Vitterhets Historic Och Antikvitetsakademien, Stockholm, 15. 

Pamphlets from The Royal Colonial Institution, London. 

The Pennsylvania Magazine, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, April, October, 

1915 and January, 1916. 
The Huguenot Society of London, By-Laws and List of Fellows, 1914. 
South Carolina Historical Society, Charleston, S. C, Volume XVI, No. 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Georgia Historical Society, Annals, 1915. 
Georgia Historical Society, Volume 12. 

The Trezevant Family in the United States, by John T. Trezevant. 
Bowdoin College Bulletins, Brunswick, Maine. 
Kansas State Historical Society, Nineteenth Biennial Report July 1, 1912 to 

June 30, 1914. 
Transactions of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, May, 1915. 
The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, July, 1915. 
The Huguenot Society of London, By-Laws and List of Fellows, 1915. 
Missouri Historical Review, The State Historical Society of Missouri. 
Proceedings of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin. 
Annals of Iowa, l)cs Moines, Iowa, 3 numbers. 
Wisconsin Historical Collections, Index, Volume I-XX. 
Annual Report American Historical Association, 2 volumes. 
Volume I, Annual Report, 1913, Volume II, Papers of Jas. A. Bayard. 
The Old North Western Genealogical Quarterly, Volume XV, Nos. 3, 4. 
Pomeroy Genealogy and Family. 

Report of the Council, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1914. 
The Missouri Historical Review, April, July, October, 1915, January, 1916. 
New York State Historical Association, Volume XIII, 1914. 
Library of Congress Annual Report 1915. 

Huguenot Society of London Proceedings, Volume XI, Number 1. 
University of North Carolina, The James Sprunt Historical Publication, Volume 

XIV--XV. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. G. Mazyck, Historian. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 17 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING 

Charleston, S. C., May 22, 1916. 

A special meeting of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina 
was held at six o'clock this afternoon at the Hall of the South 
Society to consider the proposed amendments to the Constitu- 
tion and By-laws as recommended by the special Committee, 
whose report appears at pages 13 to 16 of Transactions No. 20 
(1914). A quorum 'being present the meeting proceeded to 
business. 

The following letters of application having been favorably 
reported by the executive committee, a motion was made and 
they were elected members of the Society: 

Mrs. Gertrude Garrard Harris, Mobile, Ala. 
Mrs. Francis Wilson Mclntyre, Pasadena, Cal. 
Miss Anzolette P. Gadsden, Lexington, Va. 
Miss Ellinor Porcher Gadsden, Lexington, Va. 
Mr. Mathew R. K. Biggs, Jr., St. Louis, Mo. 
Mr. Robert G. Kenan, Savannah, Ga. 

The President stated to the meeting that, as he was a member 
of the committee appointed to revise the Constitution and 
By-Laws, he would prefer some one taking the chair while they 
were voting on the proposed amendments. He thereupon re- 
quested Mr. Samuel G. Stoney to take the chair, and Mr. Stoney 
presided over the meeting while the proposed amendments were 
discussed and voted upon. 

1. The proposed amendment to Article III, Section 1, of the 
Constitution was rejected. 

2. The proposed amendment to Article III, Section 6, of the 
Constitution was rejected. 

3. The proposed amendment to Article IV, Section 1 ; of the 
Constitution was adopted. 

4. The proposed amendment to Section 2 of the By-Laws 
was rejected. 

5. The proposed amendment to Section 6 of the By-Laws 
was adopted. 



18 TRANSACTIONS 

6. The proposed amendment to Section 7 of the By-Laws 
was adopted. 

The following amendment to Article III, Section 6, of the 
Constitution (by changing the clause "If their report be favor- 
able, etc."), which had previously been adopted by the Execu- 
tive Committee during the recess of the Society, was confirmed: 

"If the Committee's report be favorable to any applicants, 
a majority vote of the members present shall be required to 
elect such applicants; but, if the Committee's report be unfavor- 
able to any applicants, such unfavorable report shall be consid- 
ered as confirmed without a vote of the Society, unless three 
members object, in which case a vote by ballot shall be taken 
for each of such applicants separately and a two-thirds vote of 
the members present shall be required to reject such unfavorable 
report and to elect such applicant. Membership shall begin 
with the Anniversary Meeting (April 13) at which the applicant 
may be elected, or (if elected at a meeting other than an Anni- 
versary Meeting) then with the Anniversary Meeting next after 
such other meeting." 

The following amendment to Section 6 of the By-Laws (by addi- 
tion thereto), which had been previously adopted by the Execu- 
tive Committee during the recess of the Society, was confirmed: 

"It shall be the duty of the Secretary, in addition to his 
other duties, to keep a list of the members by card or other- 
wise, and on such list to write after the name of each member 
the name or names of the Huguenots through whom lie or she 
claims descent under subdivision "Firstly" of Section 1, Article 
III of the Constitution, as shown by his or her written appli- 
cation for membership — or else his or her qualification for mem- 
bership otherwise than by descent under subdivisions "Sec- 
ondly" and "Thirdly" and "Fourthly" of Section 1, Article 
III, of the Constitution." 

On motion it was unanimously resolved that the foregoing 
changes in the Constitution and By-Laws take effect at the 
next anni versa ry meeting. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned. 

Daniel Raven el, Secretary. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH. CAROLINA 19 

THE INFLUENCE OF RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION ON 
HUGUENOT COLONIZATION 

Address by Alexander R. Lawton 

" Credulity is a monarch upon whose kingdom the sun never 
sets. The cradle and the grave are its frontiers, the entire 
human race its subjects. 

"The mind of man has not as yet been able to invent any 
theory, creed, or religion, which, being earnestly proclaimed, is 
met with unconditional and unanimous rejection. The more 
complete the absence of proof, the more fervent the voice of 
faith. In a matter involving a bushel of corn or an acre of 
land, no person surrenders his liberty of judgment. Upon a 
question involving the soul's salvation for all eternity, the sons 
and daughters of Adam and Eve accept the creed in which they 
happen to be born, and give to the most vital of all subjects 
less examination than they would give to the age of a horse 
they are about to buy. Tremendous propositions in theology 
are accepted without question, because they are the hereditary 
beliefs in the family. We take our religion as we take the 
family lands, tenements, and hereditaments; they belonged to 
our father, and we are the next of kin. 

"Most of us are Christians because our fathers before us were 
Christians. Upon the same reasoning your born Turk is always 
a Mohammedan, and your born Buddhist devoutly believes in 
Gautama." 

Thus does the author of the Story of France open his chapter 
on the Reformation with two propositions apparently in con- 
flict, but both well founded in fact; the blind unquestioning 
faith with which man generally accepts the religion of his en- 
vironment, and the willing acceptance by at least a sprinkling 
of the population, of any religious dogma that is new. 

Probably nothing has exerted greater influence on the his- 
tory of mankind than these two qualities of the human mind. 

Had the rule of heritable religion been universal and with- 
out exception, the history of the world from the beginning of 



20 TRANSACTIONS 

time would have to be rewritten, and most things that are 
would not be. Had man from generation to generation been 
content to follow in religion the rule that what was good enough 
for his father was good enough for him, there would have always 
been but one creed, and we should have had no schisms, no con- 
troversies, no inquisitions, no persecutions, no spreading of new 
gospels or suppression of old ones with lire and sword. Elimi- 
nate these from history and we have left nothing but surmise. 
Had the follbwers of Luther and Calvin in France been per- 
mitted by their French brethren of the ancient Catholic faith, 
and their more ardent and more bigoted Spanish enemies of the 
same faith, to depart in peace from the beaten path, it is by no 
means impossible that the entire Atlantic coast of North America 
from Labrador to Mexico might now be peopled by a race of 
Frenchmen, Protestant Frenchmen, descendants of the brave 
and industrious Fluguenots whom France in her blindness lost, 
and whose beneficent influence on the destinies and progress 
of our country are so clearly set forth by Mr. Dubois in the 
last volume of your Transactions. 

Religious persecution is recorded in the earliest history of 
mankind. Its most conspicuous illustration is coincident with 
the beginning of the Christian era, and the instrument of tor- 
ture on which the holy victim perished is the symbol of the 
creed and the spirit which have been the inspiration and the 
lite' of all the greatest, and of many of the most infamous, 
deeds oi earth. It was only by the unflinching martyrdom of 
the followers of Christ that the early Christian church was hrst 
established. As its strength increased it branded as heretics 
all who ventured beyond the prescribed limits of established 
dogma, and persecuted them. Laws against heresy are of an- 
cient lineage. During the fourth century under Yalentinian I 
and Theodosius I (whose chief claim to distinction from his 
predecessors and his successors is his pious submission to St. 
Ambrose) they became more frequent and more stringent, and 
at this period as many as sixty-eight are known to have been 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 21 

enacted within about half a century. They were, however, in 
the main, directed not at faith but at practices, not at doctrine 
but at form of worship. Nor were the punishments so univer- 
sally cruel or so widespread as in later years. In the seventh 
century occurred the Hejira from which the Mohammedan era 
is dated. It was the flight from persecution of Mohammed, 
himself the leader and the founder of the religion of the sword. 
It is recorded, however, that his followers who controlled Spain 
for so many centuries set her an example of religious toleration 
which to this day she has declined to follow. 

After the lapse of the first ten centuries of the Christian era 
executions for heresy in the Holy Roman Empire, in France, in 
Italy, in England were frequent. The extermination of the 
Albigenses under Philip Augustus and Louis VIII early in the 
thirteenth century, when practically a whole province was 
destroyed and all its inhabitants were butchered or burned, is 
one of the terrible tales of history. And the butcher was Simon 
de Montfort, first of the name, whose son and namesake suc- 
ceeded to the earldom of Leicester, fought and imprisoned his 
king, summoned a new parliament in 1264, and by including 
in the summons two citizens from each borough established a 
first precedent which proved to be the foundation of the British 
House of Commons. 

The terrible Inquisition first appears by name in the appoint- 
ment in 1232 of a monk as inquisitor Jiercticae pravHatis. 

John Wycliffe, first translator of the Bible into English (A.D. 
1382), was carried off by paralysis before his orthodox religious 
enemies could burn his Jiving body, but nearly half a century 
later, by decree of the Synod of Constance, his bones were 
exhumed and burned and the ashes sown broadcast on the 
waters. This Synod was not always so careless or so unlucky 
as to be forestalled by bodily disease in the race for victims. 
About twenty years after Wycliffe's inconsiderate death, it 
burned his two great followers John Huss and Jerome of Prague. 
No chances were taken. They were burned at Constance while 
the Synod was in session, notwithstanding the promise of safe 



22 TRANSACTIONS 

conduct in their attendance. Savonarola, whose preaching of 
reform was so effective that, like Calvin in Geneva, he became 
practically dictator of Florence, was strangled and hurried in 
1498. 

Suppression of heresy and the resultant persecution were in 
the air. They were part of the atmosphere which the people 
breathed. When it was not practiced by both sides, it was 
because only one side was sufficiently strong. The French 
Huguenots who gained control in Montpellier in 1562, not only 
prohibited the solemnization of the Mass, but burned the Catho- 
lic churches. John Calvin fled from France to Geneva to 
escape persecution, and became apostle and founder of the great 
school of religion which bears his name and de facto ruler of the 
republic. Bancroft refers modern republican liberty to ''the 
influence of the little Republic of Geneva and Calvinism." 
He engaged in bitter controversy with Servetus, physician 
(discoverer of the short circulation of the blood), theologian, 
geographer, and mathematician who, while still claiming to be a 
Catholic, denied the doctrine of the Trinity. Calvin denounced 
him to the Catholic Inquisition, announced that if he came to 
Geneva he would not permit him to depart alive, and seven 
years later kept his word by burning him at the stake. The 
French heretic burned the Spanish heretic because the par- 
ticular doctrine which the Spanish heretic attacked was one 
which the French heretic continued to accept. 

How universally the right to persecute for religious differ- 
ences was accepted by Catholics and Protestants alike is con- 
spicuously illustrated — I might say ludicrously illustrated, 
were the consequences not so grave — by the Religious Peace of 
Augsburg. Wearied of the internecine wars growing out of the 
then seething Reformation, the German states concluded a 
treaty of peace in 1555 whereby each reigning sovereign, so 
long as he sat on his throne, should be free to adopt whichever 
form of religion he preferred, and, without interference from 
other governments, to force it upon his subjects. As this royal 
religious liberty necessarily extended to the successors of the 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 23 

participants, it exposed the unfortunate subjects of these cruel 
rulers to endless shifting persecutions, with the comforting 
knowledge, however, that a change of sovereigns might con- 
vert the persecuted of today into the persecutor of tomorrow. 

I fear the millenium will come before the religious intol- 
erance of the individual will disappear. It is confined to no 
class of persons or beliefs. The noted apostle of infidelity, 
Robert C. Ingersoll, was as intolerant in words as was Philip 
II in deeds. But 'the atmosphere of freedom of conscience in 
which we live makes it difficult to realize that official, govern- 
mental intolerance has survived very close to us to very recent 
years, and in one of the large Christian nations is the policy of 
today. 

While Protestant Virginia welcomed her Huguenot immigrants 
by erecting their settlement into a separate parish, and reliev- 
ing them from taxation for seven years, Protestant South Caro- 
lina so interfered with their divine worship that they were 
forced to appeal to the Lords Proprietors, and she long refused 
them the rights of citizenship. For many years after the set- 
tlement of the colony, the vestrymen of St. Phillips' Parish, in 
whom were vested certain governmental functions, were re- 
quired by law to make oath on qualification that they rejected 
the doctrine of transubstantiation. It was not until 1858 that 
the great English Universities would confer any degree upon one 
who could not subscribe to the Thirty-Nine Articles, and this 
burden was not removed from the Master's Degree until 1871. 
But today a Jew sits as Lord Chief Justice of England! 

But a century has elapsed since the abolition by papal decree 
of torture as one of the authorized implements of the Inquisition. 
Ferdinand and Isabella, not satisfied with the pontifical inquisi- 
tion, had established the noted Spanish Inquisition as a separate 
institution in 1480. It continued to have official sanction 
until Napoleon entered Madrid in 1808 and abolished it. The 
Spanish Cortes and Ferdinand VII restored it in 1813 and 1814; 
the revolution of 1820 again destroyed it; it was revived in 1823, 
and finally abolished by royal decree July 15, 1834. Not until 



24 TRANSACTIONS 

1869, however, was the principle of religious liberty "pro- 
claimed" in Spain. There soon followed a provision of the ( in- 
stitution of 1876 (still in force, I believe) which forbids "exter- 
nal signs or public manifestations of all religious confessions" 
except that of the state. A governmental decree of the same 
year officially construed this as applying only to external signs 
and symbols on church edifices; but, as late as 1902 this inter- 
pretation was formally annulled by royal decree. To you who 
meet to commemorate a great struggle for religious liberty there 
is comfort in this striking evidence that the most conspicuous 
modern instance of the decay of influence and power is found in 
the only Christian state in which man may not worship his God 
according to his conscience. 

When America was added to the geographical world, the at- 
mosphere was saturated with bigotry and intolerance. They 
presided at its birth and it was impossible that its destiny 
should not be affected by them. Ferdinand and Isabella, 
founders of the Spanish Inquisition, had ascended the thrones 
of Aragon and Castile as joint sovereigns of United Kingdoms 
but thirteen years earlier. Luther was a boy of nine. Calvin 
was to see the light seventeen, and Servetus nineteen, years 
later. It was but a generation before Henry VIII, shortly 
after the Pope had conferred upon him the title of Defender of 
the Faith, procured the passage of the Act of Supremacy which 
permanently separated England from the Pontificate. Gra- 
nada fell and the' Moslem was finally driven from his last strong- 
hold in Spain in the very year of the Great F)iscovery. In the 
same year Jews were expelled from Spain. Savonarola perished 
six years later. 

It was in 1517 that Luther launched the Reformation by post- 
ing on the church door at Wittenberg his ninety-five theses. 
Calvin was then a child of eight. So rapidly did the cause ad- 
vance that at the age of thirty-two Calvin was not only the 
spiritual father, but practically the dictator of Protestant Ge- 
neva. Shortly after the close of the first half of the sixteenth 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 25 

century there were districts in France in which the celebration 
of the Catholic Mass was wholly discontinued, and it is conserva- 
tively estimated that, despite opposition and persecution of the 
crown, one-tenth of the population of France was Huguenot. 
This number included but few of the proletariat, to whom the 
accompanying abandonment of form and ceremonial did not 
appeal, nor did it include a proportionate representation of the 
nobility, whose extraordinary privileges would be endangered 
by a breach with Catholic royalty. Most of them were mer- 
chants and artisans, so distinctly the backbone of the indus- 
trial arts and the commerce of France that, when Louis XIV 
either slew them or drove them to other lands, he gave to the 
commerce and industry of France a stinging blow, the effect of 
which was apparent for many generations. 

Among the small band of nobles who embraced the new faith 
and stood by it was Gaspard de Coligny, High Admiral of 
France, leader of the Huguenots during the religious wars, and 
most conspicuous victim of the Massacre of St. Bartholomew. 
He came into the world in the same year in which the monk of 
Wittenberg nailed his theses to the church door, and grew to 
manhood in an atmosphere of religious controversy. Flis dif- 
ferences with his sovereign impaired neither his loyalty nor his 
patriotism, but he placed God and conscience above king and 
country. Loving both his church and his state, he dreamed of 
empire for both, and his mind turned to the new El Dorado 
where he believed that France could extend her empire, and 
Protestantism could permanently establish her shrine, forever 
freed from persecution and even from controversy. 

France had been among the first to turn to the new world. It 
is seriously claimed that one Cousin of Dieppe, driven by ad- 
verse winds on a voyage down the African coast, had beheld the 
new hemisphere four years before Columbus had touched its 
outlying islands. It is well established that the hardy Breton 
fishermen had frequented Newfoundland fisheries before 1517, 
probably as early as 1504, and possibly before 1497. 

Nicholas Durand de Villegagnon was a Knight of Malta, a 



26 TRANSACTIONS 

soldier-monk, with a splendid record of military and naval 
achievement, lie was a scholar, a controversialist, an orator, 
and a scoundrel. Parkman calls him " this Crichton of J' ranee," 
which seems an injustice to the "admirable" and famous youth 
born shortly after Villegagnon's return to France, lie used his 
arts upon Henry II to persuade him to found an empire for 
France on the coast of Brazil, despite the monopoly claimed by 
Spain and Portugal. He enlisted and secured the support of 
Cohgny by suggesting that the expedition should be composed 
of Huguenots, thus holding out the realization of the great man's 
dream. To the king he was a Catholic, to Coligny a heretic. 
The exploit enlisted the support of Calvin. Villegagnon gained 
the royal assent, and two vessels under his command sailed 
July 12, 1555, with motley crews of earnest Fluguenots, equally 
earnest Catholics, adventurous, poverty stricken young nobles, 
reckless artisans, and piratical sailors. The company included 
three Scotchmen. They landed in the beautiful Bay of Rio de 
Janeiro, and named it Ganabara; and the island on which they 
settled still bears the name of their infamous commander. He 
soon showed his true colors. He marked the growing ascend- 
ency at court of the Catholic party, and curried favor by per- 
secution, cruelty, and murder of his Huguenot colonists. 
Finally, deserting them on the pretense of obtaining re-enforce- 
ments, he returned to France and engaged, with credit to his 
abilities as a controversialist, in an elaborate theological contest 
with Calvin, whom he had previously dubbed a "frightful her- 
etic.' 7 We cannot stop to follow the fortunes of this ill-fated 
first American colony of Frenchmen. What Villegagnon failed 
to do was begun by hostile Indians and completed by the Por- 
tugese, who destroyed the remnants of the deserted colony 
within three years after its establishment. 

Coligny did not despair. Fie still dreamed his dream of em- 
pire for church and country. His second venture was more 
auspicious in its origin and, had its fate depended upon the 
qualities of its commander, might well have ended in success. 
Jean Ribaut was a seaman of Dieppe, a staunch Protestant, a 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 27 

skilled navigator, a brave leader endowed with character and 
courage. With two ships carrying sailors, a band of veteran 
soldiers, and some young nobles (but no tillers of the soil, no 
artisans), he sailed from Havre February 18, 1562, for Florida, 
which, in the nomenclature of the day, comprehended practi- 
cally the whole of the known continent of North America. 

After planting a stone monument at the mouth of the St. 
Johns River, near the site of the future Fort Caroline, and linger- 
ing near the site of Fernandina, Ribaut crossed the bar of Port 
Royal Sound May 27, 1562, and planted on South Carolina soil 
the first French colony of North America. He did not discover 
this splendid harbor. The Spaniard Vasquez de Ay lion touched 
there about 1526, leaving behind him no record but the name of 
Cape St. Helena, and rapidly proceeding to found his short- 
lived colony at Jamestown, Va. 

One cannot read the early history of the new continent with- 
out paying tribute to the skill, the daring, the zeal, and the 
irresistible determination of the Spanish Conquistadores. It 
almost makes one forget their intolerances, their cruelties and 
their selfish greed for gold. Four Spanish explorers of the 
early decades of the sixteenth century, Narvaez who explored 
Florida, Ponce de Leon who penetrated hundreds of miles into the 
interior, Ayllon who touched at Port Royal and settled at James- 
town, and De Soto who reached the Mississippi, perhaps as far up 
as its junction with the Missouri, all lost their lives in the ad- 
venturous tasks they had assumed. The body of De Soto was 
brought by his companions down the great river which he had 
explored. 

Ribaut remained at Port Royal but a fortnight, and, sailing 
for France, left behind him thirty men commanded by Albert 
de Pierria. "From the North Pole to Mexico there was no 
Christian denizen but they." 

This small colony was distinctly military, lacking all the 
other qualities necessary to the success afterwards attained by 
the hardy, industrious pioneers of Jamestown and Plymouth. 
While the Indians were on the whole friendly, they soon ceased 



28 TRANSACTIONS 

to fear or respect men who became dependent on their bounty 
for the daily food which they themselves were too proud or too 
indolent to secure by timely forethought and useful labor. 
Albert de Pierria proved to be a stern and cruel martinet and 
was murdered by victims of his onerous discipline. His suc- 
cessor, Nicholas. Barre was equally unable to inspire his dwin- 
dling band with appreciation of the dignity of labor as a mean-, 
of sustaining the colony, but all finally united in herculean 
effort to use' the raw materials and the scanty implements- 
available to them in building a ship to bear them back to France, 
applying in their desperation energy and industry which, sooner 
applied with wisdom and judgment to tilling the soil, might 
have established the colony on a firm basis. The vessels on 
which they thus embarked was unseaworthy, their supplies of 
food inadequate. One of their number, chosen by lot, was sac- 
rificed to satisfy the hunger and avert the starvation of his 
mates, and the survivors, captured within bight of their native- 
land by the English, became prisoners of Queen Elizabeth; 
their captors first putting ashore those whose illness was so des- 
perate as to make them undesirable. 

Thus perished in 1563 the second Huguenot colony of the 
new world, and the first on the continent of North America. 
Port Royal Sound, always one of the finest harbors on the 
North Atlantic, lost its opportunity of sheltering the first per- 
manent colony on our shores. In 1670 Sayle's expedition in- 
spected it and settled by preference in Charleston harbor. Lord 
Cardross established there a colony in 1683, which was destroyed 
by the Spaniards within three years. For near a century and 
a half after the sailing away of Barre and his luckless band, its 
great natural advantages failed to attract and sustain a perma- 
nent settlement, and to this day there is no satisfactory answer 
to the question why there is no development of its great facili- 
ties, why, in the wonderful growth of our commerce, this great 
natural port was so far outstripped in the struggle for material 
advancement and development by her neighbours not so well 
favored by nature. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 29 

And still the great Coligny did not despair. In 1564 the 
Peace of Amboise had brought a lull in the Religious Wars of 
France, in which he had so distinguished himself, and he was 
again restored to favor. Still dreaming of colonial empire for 
his country and his church, he promoted a third expedition. 
He was a patriot and a zealot, but alas he was no colonist! 
Again he selected soldiers, a few artisans hired by them to 
spare them the ignominy of labor, and young nobles who sought 
only adventure; but no tillers of the soil. Only in name were 
they all Huguenots. The commander was Rene de Laudon- 
niere, a nobleman of Poitou attached to the house of which 
Coligny was the head; an excellent and pious mariner, who 
seemed worthy of the great responsibility which he assumed. 
On June 25, 1564, Laudonniere's squadron anchored at the 
mouth of St. Johns River, Florida, then called the River of 
May, where Ribaut had planted his stone monument two years 
before. Le Moyne, who attained fame as a painter, was a mem- 
ber of the band, and he and Laudonniere, both of whom ulti- 
mately escaped the destructive carnage of the Spaniards, have 
left to us the story of this ill-fated venture. Save for the ca- 
tastrophe which extinguished it but fifteen months after the 
planting of Fort Caroline on St. John's Bluff, a few miles below 
the site of Jacksonville, it is but a repetition on a large scale 
of the story of Port Royal: no stable foundations, no well or- 
dered plans for permanency, no agriculture, unwise dealings 
with the Indians resulting in murder and war, attempts at piracy, 
mutiny, first the buying and then the begging of food from the 
Indians, temporary relief towards the end from the visiting 
squadron of Sir John Hawkins, the great English Admiral; a 
sad and interesting story charmingly and graphically told by 
Parkman in his Pioneers of France in the New World. The end 
of the story begins with the arrival on August 28, 1565, of 
Ribaut, founder of the Port Royal colony, with seven ships and 
re-enforcement of three hundred men, to find the colonists pre- 
paring to return home in a ship which Laudonniere had pur-^. 
chased from Hawkins. 



30 TRANSACTIONS 

Possibly Ribaut had learned a lesson in colonization from the 
experience of Port Royal; and we may surmise that hib timely 
arrival with men and supplies, aided by his personal qualities 
as a commander, might have turned the tide and brought a 
sound beginning to the realization of Coligny's dream. But it 
was not to be. Just seven days after Ribaut's arrival, Menen- 
dez, the " pious cut-throat," appeared at the mouth of the 
River of May. 

Pedro de Menendez was a picturesque type of the Spaniard 
of his day. Born of an ancient Asturian family, he was from 
his boyhood a daring adventurer. He was a skilful soldier and 
mariner, and as commander of an expedition to the Indies, had 
acquired great wealth.. He was an earnest and a zealous 
Catholic, and conscientiously believed that the effective pro- 
motion of the Kingdom of Christ required the ruthless extermi- 
nation of all who dissented from the dogmas of Rome. Unlike 
his French contemporary Villegagnon, he was no scholar and no 
hypocrite. He avowed his purpose to expel the French and to 
slay all heretics, but laid earnest stress upon the christianizing 
of the Indians whose souls would otherwise be lost. Philip II 
made him "Adelantado of Florida" for life, with the right to 
name his successor. The kingdom thus given to him, with 
liberal rights of trade with other Spanish colonies (a privilege 
usually denied) extended from Labrador to Mexico, from the 
Atlantic to the unknown inland depths. His scheme was am- 
bitious, covering among other points a garrison on Chesapeake 
Pay, then thought to connect with the Gulf of St. Lawrence. 
The force which he organized was formidable, more than thirty 
ships and more than four thousand men. The llagship was of 
near one thousand tons burden. But this adventurous zealot 
was impatient and, anxious to forestall Ribaut and reach Fort 
Caroline before him, he sailed in June, 1565 with eleven of 
his larger ships, leaving the smaller ones to follow. The fact 
that when Philip II launched this expedition Spain and France 
were at peace shows that the want of international morals is not 
peculiar to our twentieth century. 






HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 31 

In the fights and massacres that followed Menendez' arrival 
on September 4, 1565, at the mouth of the River of May with 
five ships and over eight hundred men, he asked but one ques- 
tion of each band with whom he came in contact: "Are you 
Catholics, or are you Lutherans?" With brutal frankness, and 
clearly with deep religious conviction, he announced that his 
mission was "to hang and behead all Lutherans whom I shall 
find by land or sea according to instructions from my king so 
precise that I have power to pardon none; and these commands 
I shall fulfill as you will see .... every heretic shall 
die." His first attack was unsuccessful and he sailed south- 
ward. Uniting with three more of his ships at the mouth of an 
inlet which he named San Augustin, he founded St. Augustine, 
the oldest town on the continent. 

Ribaut sailed from Fort Caroline to attack the Spaniards at 
St. Augustine, but his squadron was scattered and his ships 
wrecked by an unprecedented storm. Meanwhile the bold 
Menendez, taking advantage of the assistance of the elements 
(which he declared to be the intervention of God) and the un- 
protected condition of Fort Caroline through the absence of 
Ribaut's fleet, marched overland through the dense forests to the 
Huguenot settlement, surprised the fort and butchered the 
entire garrison, except a handful who escaped to one of Ribaut's 
ships left behind and a small number captured alive. These 
prisoners he hanged* on trees, and placed above their heads his 
justification: "I DO THIS, NOT AS TO FRENCHMEN, BUT 
AS TO HERETICS." 

A like fate betook the brave Ribaut and the soldiers and 
sailors who followed him. Cast successively in groups upon the 
shore near St. Augustine, Menendez met them, parleyed with 
them, told them that he waged war against all Lutherans "with 
all cruelty," and that, if they surrendered, he would do with 
them as God should give him grace, received their surrender, 
bound their hands, and butchered them on the spot. But the 
last small band he for some reason spared, and Philip con- 
demned them to the galleys. A few had refused to surrender 
and escaped to Indians in the forest. 



32 TRANSACTIONS 

When this terrible story reached France, there was natu- 
rally much indignation. But the influence of Coligny and his 
Huguenot following had waned, and the weak and vacillating 
Charles IX was completely under the influence of Spain. The 
king would do nothing. But France had one citizen, probably 
a Catholic, certainly not avowedly a Huguenot, "a simple 
gentleman of Mont de Marsan," Dominique de Gourgues, 
who, smarting under recollection of the sufferings he had en- 
dured as a Spanisli galley slave, undertook to avenge this great 
wrong inflicted by his mortal enemy. He concealed his purpose 
by obtaining a commission to kidnap negro slaves from the 
Niger, sold his patrimony, mustered three small vessels and one 
hundred and eighty men, and sailed for Fort Caroline August 22, 
1567, nearly two years after the butchery of Ribaut's and Lau- 
donniere's companies. Disclosing to his crew at sea his real 
purpose, he met with a hearty response, and finally anchored 
North of the River of May, in either the St. Mary's or the Sa- 
tilla. Here he enlisted the aid of the Indians of whom the 
Spaniards had made enemies by successive outrages, and at- 
tacked Fort Caroline. He was completely successful, and, ex- 
cept for a few prisoners purposely kept alive, slew the entire 
garrison. Menendez was not among them. The prisoners he 
hanged on the same trees on which his compatriots had been 
hanged by Menendez, and over them he wrote: "NOT AS TO 
SPANIARDS, PUT AS TO TRAITORS, ROBBERS AND 
MURDERERS." 

This "simple gentleman of Mont de Marsan," having accom- 
plished his gruesome mission and being too weak to attack St. 
Augustine, returned to France, lived in obscurity and hardship 
for years because of the influence of the Spanish minister, but 
was finally restored to favor. His merits induced Elizabeth of 
England and Don Antonio of Portugal to offer him place and 
power, but he died of a sudden illness before he could once 
more fight his ancient enemies. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 33 

France came again to found colonies in America, but not 
Huguenot colonies. There were Huguenots in the colonies in 
Nova Scotia and on the St. Lawrence, but, save for brief periods, 
Catholic influence was always in the ascendant. The Great 
Champlain, the Father of New France, who first firmly estab- 
lished his country in America, was an earnest Catholic, and when 
the brilliant Jesuits came, they soon became masters of the 
situation. Nor did France again venture onto the Southern 
coast. Except for one short-lived settlement in Maine, de- 
stroyed by the English from Virginia, she confined herself to the 
present Dominion of Canada, the northwestern interior, and the 
domain included in the Louisiana purchase. How the first two 
were wrested from her by England, and how the last was ac- 
quired by the United States from the great Napoleon, are 
familiar history of our own country. 

With the vengenace of Dominque de Gourgues ends not only 
the story of Huguenot colonization, but also all contest between 
Spain and France on the North American continent. Spain's 
last struggle on the Atlantic mainland was with England, and, 
small as were the numbers actually engaged, was decisive in its 
results. The chief aim of England in founding the colony of 
Georgia in 1733 was the protection of South Carolina, then 
sixty-three years old, from the aggressions of the Spaniards from 
the south. Notwithstanding the philanthropic features of the 
plans which the Trustees formed and undertook, Georgia was 
founded distinctly as a military colony. The chosen commander 
was a young soldier, and an able one, who had distinguished 
himself under Marlborough and Prince Eugene. It was in the 
late years of his long and useful life that General Oglethorpe 
acquired his fame as a philanthropist, though his love for his 
fellow man was clearly a controlling influence when he suc- 
ceeded in bringing to Georgia among his first colonists a number 
of unfortunates confined in the debtor's prisons. It was but 
seven years after the founding of the colony that the first con- 
test for supremacy began. Realizing that the best way to repel 
invasion may be to invade, Oglethorpe in 1740, re-enforced by 



34 TRANSACTIONS 

troops from South Carolina, laid siege to St. Augustine. He was 
unsuccessful and was compelled to abandon the exploit. Two 
years later, by royal command from Spain to the Captain 
General at Havana there was launched a counter attack on a 
large and elaborate scale under immediate command of Monti- 
ano, commander at St. Augustine. But instructions, not only 
as to the scope of the expedition, but as to military and naval 
tactics by which success should be assured, came in great detail 
from the king's officers. They included not only the complete 
destruction of every fort and settlement in Georgia, but, moving 
on to the older colony, a like fate for Port Royal and Charleston. 
Spain intended it to be decisive, and it was: for when Ogle- 
thorpe met on St. Simon's Island and routed a small body of 
Montiano's men at the famous little battle of Bloody Marsh, 
the entire formidable expedition withdrew and never returned. 
This was the last contest between England and Spain on this 
continent, and finally saved Georgia and South Carolina from 
the terrible fate which had overtaken so many of the enemies 
of Spain in America. Nevermore did Spain set hobtile foot 
upon the soil of a British colony. 

Spain held on to Florida from the day on which Menendez 
settled at St. Augustine; but it was not the Florida of the six- 
teenth century extending from Labrador to Mexico, but rather 
the Florida of today. Save for Florida she never established 
her rule on the Atlantic mainland. She held Louisiana for 
seventeen years by session from France, and held a large portion 
of the present United States as part of Mexico. What she has not 
been forced to sell, she has lost by conquest, and in 1898 she 
was finally driven from the Caribbean. The discoverer of the 
Western Hemisphere who first sent her bold adventurers to ex- 
plore and exploit it — always for gold, never for development — ■ 
and who long controlled the half of it, has no longer even a 
small island which she can claim as her own. It is a terrible 
lesson, this humbling of a great nation. England learned from 
the American Revolution her costly lesson in the treatment of 
colonies, and is today receiving her reward in the enthusiastic 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 35 

loyalty and devotion which they yield her in her hour of need. 
Spain could never learn. 

It is regrettable that history should teach us, as it does, 
that persecution, when sufficiently continuous and persistent, 
w;ll effectively suppress freedom of religious thought and prac- 
tice. Persecution in France, notwithstanding the severity of it 
while it was practiced, was not as firmly and continuously per- 
sistent as it was with her neighbours, and yet she has but one 
Protestant to fifty Catholics. Italy was much more persistent 
and has one Protestant to over three hundred Catholics. Spain 
has never faltered in her bigotry and has but one Protestant to 
every four thousand Catholics. Yes, persecution can be made 
effective, but, happily the lesson does not stop there. The 
Moslem countries and Spain are its most persistent and .con- 
spicuous exponents, and it is not illogical to say that their ex- 
perience teaches that the prosperity and advancement of na- 
tions are in inverse ratio to their bigotry and intolerance. 

Had the forces of religious bigotry and persecution not inter- 
fered, would Coligny's dream have been realized? Would the 
French Huguenot have continued to plant his colonies on our 
Atlantic coast, and would his conspicuous qualities of thrift and 
sterling character have sustained and expanded them as did the 
English? We are not justified in concluding that the failure 
of these broad plans was due to persecution alone, but it is 
clear that the immediate proximate cause was the discourage- 
ment and opposition which harrassed and persecuted the colon- 
ists abroad and their supporters at home, and the murderous 
destruction wrought by the pious Menendez abroad. We can 
at least say that, had the age been one of religious tolerance, it 
might have been. 

What if Coligny had succeeded? The conception involves 
such fundamental changes in what we now see, that speculation 
on results is only interesting, not instructive. Had this been a 
group of French colonies, w r ould there have been an American 
Revolution? Would some Frenchman have been our Wash- 



36 TRANSACTIONS 

ington? What would have happened in America during the 
French Revolution? How would we have fared in the redis- 
tribution of the world when Napoleon fell? Would we have 
then sought our independence? Would we have been spared 
the distress of our own Civil War? Would Lee and Jackson 
have lived their lives in obscurity, or lived at all? Would we 
have tried to keep pace with the kaleidoscopic changes of gov- 
ernment in France between Waterloo and the debacle of 1870? 
Would Germany have sought us as part of her indemnity at the 
end of the Franco-Prussian war? Would she have gotten us, 
and would we have been submissive? Would we be now 
actively engaged in the Great European War? We may ask a 
thousand such questions, but there is no answer. 

Speculate as we may on what might have been, revere as we 
may the virile Huguenots whose blood runs in our veins, we are 
content with our British traditions and our British institutions; 
but we are not sorry to reflect that if fate had decreed for our 
country a parentage that was not British, the affection and the 
sympathy which we zealously accord to those whose blood — the 
blood that is thicker than water — courses through our own veins, 
would be given to France, to beautiful, glorious France, where 
beauty is enthroned as one of the cardinal virtues, where pa- 
triotism is a passion. And how proud we should be of her 
today! 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 37 

THE MARION FAMILY 

The following sketch of the Marion Family and some de- 
scendants has been adapted from an account lent me by Mrs. 
Richard Kirk, nee Mitchell, and was originally extracted from 
a periodical published by William Gilmour Simms in Charleston, 
S. C, A.D. 1845, in the numbers for March, April, May, June, 
July, August, September, and October, written by Richard 
Yeadon, Esq., which numbers of the magazine were owned by 
Mr. Yates Snowden. 

While the arrangement of the following sketch differs from 
that of the above account, the facts are presented as stated 
therein, with addition of some descendants of Esther Marion. 

Charles J. Colcock, 

Charleston, S. C. 
June 14, 1909. 
1 

Jean Marion m. Perinne Bategnon (or Batagnon or Boutig- 
non) and were both citizens of the kingdom of France ante 1685. 
They had issue at least one son: 
2. i. Benjamin Marion whose history see below. 

2 

Benjamin Marion (son of Jean) was b. at Chaume, in Poitou, 
a province of France bordering on the Atlantic Ocean, who to 
escape religious persecution emigrated with his wife to South 
Carolina A. D. 1690. He married, first, Judith Baluet of 
France who accompanied her husband to Carolina. He settled 
as a planter in St. James, Goose Creek Parish, Berkeley, on a 
tract of land believed to have been a part of the northern por- 
tion of "The Elms," formerly the county seat of the Izards, 
later owned by Dr. Eli Geddings of Charleston, S. C, bounding 
north on "CrowneM," the property of Henry A. Middleton. 

The original grant to Benjamin Marion was 100 acres at the 
head of Goose Creek, formerly styled "Yeaman's Creek, and 
is dated 14 March, A. D. 1704. 



38 TRANSACTIONS 

He enlarged this possession on the 5th April, 1720, by pur- 
chase of 230 acres from John Gibbs of Berkeley (125 acres of 
which he sold to Ralph Izard) and by purchase of 22 acres 
from Isaac Fleury, while on the 25th June, 1711, he took out a 
grant of 500 acres in Berkely, bounded northwest on land 
granted the same day to his son Gabriel Marion, from which 
tract he sold 200 acres to Captain Nathaniel Broughton, pre- 
sented 200 acres to his son Paul Marion, and retained the 
remaining 100 acres until his death. 

By his first marriage, he had three children mentioned below 
along with 8 others by a second wife, Mary ", whose sur- 
name is not known. For mention of his first wife and children, 
see "List of Huguenot Emigrants" made for the purpose of 
naturalization between 17 May, 1694, and 27 September, 1695, 
found among the papers of Mr. St. Julien, and in possession of 
Mr. Ravenel of "Wantoot Plantation/' St. John's, Berkeley, 
translated and published by the late Daniel Ravenel of Charles- 
ton, S. C, sometime in the "50's." 

His will is dated 13 January, 1734, and proved 2 May, 1735, 
between which dates he must have died, in which will he men- 
tions two grandchildren, viz., Esther Gignilliat and Nancy, 
probably the daughter of either his son John or his son Benjamin, 
each of whom had a daughter Anne. By both marriages he left 
11 children mentioned below — the first three of whom were 
by Judith Baluet, and the remaining eight by his second wife 

Mary — . 

Issue by both wives: 

3. i. Esther Marion, whose history follows presently; 

4. ii. Gabriel Marion, history follows presently; 

5. iii. Benjamin Marion, history follows presently. 
By second wife: 

iv. John Marion, of St. John's, Berkeley, m. Frances 

and had children: 

i. John, 
ii. Ann, 
iii. Frances, 
iv. Mary. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 39 

His will is dated 23 February and proved 5 March, 
1739. 
v. Paul Marion, of St. James, Goosecreek, received 
from his father a gift of 200 acres of land at 
Wassamassaw, adjoining lands belonging to Mr. 
Broughton, which deed was dated 13 May, 1733. 
On the 7th July, 1735 he took out a grant of 400 
acres of land on the east side of Wassamassaw 
Swamp, bounded east by Peter Marion's land. 
His will dated 27 October, 1737 was proved 27 
January, 1738, He m. Elizabeth and mentions 
sons — Paul and Peter, 
i. Paul, 
ii. Peter. 

vi. Peter Marion, of Charleston, S. C, m. and 

d. s. p. a widower. 
The inventory of his estate is dated 19 November, 
1795. 
vii. James Marion, of Goosecreek, St. James, was the 
youngest son. He m. May and is sup- 
posed to have been the father of three sons: 
i. James, 
ii. John, 
iii. Benjamin, 
viii. Mary Marion, of her and throe following sisters 
nothing known, 
ix. Anne Marion, 
x. Elizabeth Marion, 
xi. Judith Marion. 

3 

Esther Marion (daughter of Benjamin, son of Jean) was 
b. between 1690 and 1695, for the emigrant parents, Benjamin 
and Judith Marion, had no children on their arrival, and three 
are mentioned in the "Lists of Huguenots" who were naturalized 
between the foregoing dates, viz., Esther, Gabriel, and Ben- 
jamin Marion, 



40 TRANSACTIONS 

She m. Henry Gignilliat, son of Susanne le Serrurier (daughter 
of Jacques or James Le Serrurier by his wife Elizabeth heger, 
French Huguenots) by her husband Jean Francis de Gignilliat 
who was granted 3000 acres of land as the first of the Swiss 
nation to settle in America, son of Mary de Ville by her hus- 
band Abraham Gignilliat who came to America July 30, 1685, 
ante The Revocation of The Edict of Nantes.. 

Esther Marion by her husband Henry Gignilliat, had at least 
the following children: 

i. Esther, mentioned in her grandfather's will; 
ii. Judith Gignilliat, b. A. D. 1724, m. 31 May, 1752, at the 
house of Mrs. Mary Glaze near Dorchester, William 
Maine. He d. at his home in Prince Williams Parish, 
12 March, 1776, and she d. 31 May, 1789, at the age 
of 65 years. 
Issue: 

i. Esther Maine, b. 13 March, 1756, d. 13 January, 
1821; m. 18 October, 1773, Colonel Thomas 
Hutson of Cedar Grove who was b. 9 January, 
1750, and d. 4 May, 1789. Thomas Hutson 
had the following brothers and sisters, Mary Hut- 
son who m. Arthur Peronneau of Charleston, 
Elizabeth Hutson m. Col. Isaac Hayne the 
Martyr, Richard Hutson the Chancellor and first 
Intendant of Charlestown, Esther Hutson m. 
William Hazzard Wigg, Anne Hutson m. Gen- 
eral John Barnwell — all of whom except Richard 
left posterity. Thomas Hutson was a son of 
the Rev. William Hutson, son of Thomas and 
Esther Hutson of England, by his wife Mary 
Woodward daughter of Sarah Stanyarne b. 20. 
November, 1690 (daughter of James Stanyarne 
b. 1661, d. 1703, by his wife Rachel said to have 
been a daughter of Jonathan Fitch) by her 
husband Richard Woodward, the son of Dr. 
Henry Woodward by his wife Mary the daughter 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 41 

of Col. John Godfrey — John Godfrey, Henry 

Woodward, and Jonathan Fitch were members 

of the Council of the early colony of Carolina. 

Esther Maine by her husband Thomas Hutson 

had the following issue: 
i. Mary Woodward Hutson, b. 23 November, 
1774, m. Judge Charles Jones Colcock, 
from whom descend the family of Colcock 
in South Carolina — vide S. C. Historical 
Magazine; 
. ii. William Maine Hutson, b. 13 January, 1777, 
m. Martha Hay, from whom descend a 
branch of the family of Hutson; 

ili. Esther Hutson, b. 5 January, 1779, m. Alex- 
ander Fraser Gregorie, from whom de- 
scend a branch of the family of Gregorie; 

iv. Thomas Hutson, b. 3 September, 1784, who 
with his adversary was killed at Beaufort, 
S. C, 15 September, 1807, in a duel with 
Mr. Smith; 

v. Richard Woodward Hutson, b. 17 October, 
1788, and m., first, Martha O'Reilly Fer- 
guson, daughter of Mr. Ferguson by his 
wife who was a daughter of Eliza Milner 
Colcock by her husband Daniel Bacot. 
From them derive a branch of the family 
of Hutson of South Carolina. 



Gabriel Marion (son of Benjamin, son of Jean) b. about 
1693, d. sometime between the years 1747 and 1751; and was 
survived by his widow and five sons and one daughter. 

He m. between the dates 1711 and 1716, Esther, daughter of 
Dr. Anthony Cordes of St. John's, Berkeley, wdio had emigrated 
from France with his wife Esther Madeline Baluet, sister to 



42 TRANSACTIONS 

Judith Baluet who m. Benjamin Marion, thus Gabriel Marion 

m. his first cousin maternally. 

Between the year 1733 and 1735, lie removed to Georgetown, 

S. C. and after his death his widow removed from Georgetown 

to St. John's, Berkeley, living with her sons Gabriel and Francis 

who are shown by the old muster rolls to have enlisted in a 

company 31 January, 1756. 
Her will is dated 7 October, 1757 and proved 28 January, 

1758, about which time she must have died. 

Gabriel Marion by his wife Esther Cord.es had issue: 

i. Isaac Marion, who d. 31 May, 1781, and was buried in 
the church yard at Georgetown, and his widow Rebecca 
b. 12 May, 1722, d. at Georgetown in April, 1790. 
He was a man of great physical strength; and it is 
related that during the War of the Revolution when 
the British captured Georgetown, he was taken pris- 
oner, mounted upon an old horse facing the tail, and 
driven for several hours up and down the street that 
the enemy might extort from him information as to 
where his brother, General Francis, was concealed, 
The only satisfaction he rendered them was the taunt- 
ing threat that only too soon for them would they 
see his brother if they would remain still long enough 
to look upon him. He m. about the year 1739, Rebecca, 
daughter of William Allston by his wife Esther La- 
Bruce. Her portrait pierced by a British bayonet was 
in the year 1845 in possession of the Hon. R. F. W. 
Allston, and I believe is to be allotted by drawing 
straws to one of her descendants in the present year 
1909. He left no will. 
Issue: 

i. Isaac Marion, d. in infancy; 

ii. Rebecca Allston m. Samuel I) wight, from whom 
derive many descendants of the families of 
D wight and others with which they intermarried. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 43 

Gabriel Marion, was the second son of Gabriel and 
Esther; late in 1755 or early in 1756, he removed with 

- his mother and brother Francis Marion from George- 
town to St. John's, Berkeley, where he and Francis 
enlisted in the old St. John's company. They settled 
for one year on u Frierson ; s Lock" on the present 
Santee Canal according to James, General Marion's 
biographer, and the following year removed to Belle 
Isle in St. Stephen's parish, the residence of the late 
Robert Marion. Here he woed and won an heiress, 
Catherine, daughter of Robert and Catherine Taylor, 
his father-in-law having been the original grantee of 
Belle Isle— thus Gabriel became the owner of a fine 
estate and beautiful residence, and thus Francis gained 
that knowledge of the Santee lowlands which later 
earned for him the soubriquet "The Swamp Fox" and 
turned the tide of fortune in the Revolution to the side 
of the colonists— there are no trifles in our lives. The 
miniature of Mrs. Gabriel Marion, in the year 1645, 
hung in the hall at Belle Isle, showing her to have 
been a lady of great beauty and suggestive of great 
intelligence. Mr. Taylor was a connection of the 
Ravenels and lived back of "Pooshe," later the prop- 
erty of Mr. Henry Ravenel. He was a warden of St. 
Stephen's Church in 1765 and a generous subscriber 
to the St. Stephen's Brick Church, but his name does 
not appear in the church records after 1766. He was 
generous and gave liberal assistance to his brother 
Francis who was poor, and is described by the Hon. 
William DuBose of St. Stephens as holding equally 
aloof from Mars and Venus, both of which character- 
istics were later to undergo a transformation. There 
is no definite evidence to prove that Gabriel with his 
provincial company took part in the war for inde- 
pendence but he bore a captain's commission in the 
Cherokee War, and it is to be presumed must have 



44 TRANSACTIONS 

rendered what service he could in 1776 until his death 
in 1777, dying in Charlestown, and was buried in Belle 
Isle. His property was divided between his sons 
Gabriel and Robert, the former receiving the St. 
Stephen's and the latter the St. John's property of 
"Walnut Grove" later owned by Mr. James Gaillard. 
Gabriel Marion by his wife, Catherine Taylor, left 
issue: 
i. Gabriel, 
ii. Robert, 
iii. Benjamin, 
iv. Catherine, 

v. Charlotte m., first, Anthony Ashby by whom a 
daughter, Charlotte Videau Ashby in. Richard 
Singleton of Sumter District. Mrs. Anthony 
Ashby m., second, her first cousin Samuel Theo- 
dore Marion, son of her uncle Job Marion, and 
had a daughter Elizabeth Marion m. Samuel 
DuBose, Esq., of St. John's, Berkeley, 

Note. — Miss Mary McDufiie, the second 
wife of Gen. Wade Hampton, was the daughter 
of General McDuftie by his wife, Miss Single- 
ton, a daughter of Richard Singleton and his 
wife, Charlotte Videau Ashby. 
iii. Benjamin Marion, third sou of Gabriel by his wife 
Esther Cordes, was a wealthy planter of St. James 
and St. Denis. His will was dated 7 December, 1775, 
and proved 9 December, 1778, a few months after his 
death 20 September, 1778. He m. twice; m. first, 
Martha, daughter of John Allston of Georgetown and 
after her death hem., second, 1752, Esther Bonneau, 
widow of Peter Bonneau of St. Thomas Parish, and 
daughter of Peter Simons of Berkeley District, 
fie left issue no sons and the following daughters: 
i. Ann Marion, m. 31 December, 1778, Thomas 
Roche of St. Marks Parish; d. s. p. 






HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 45 

ii. Martha Marion m., first, Patrick Roche of St. 
John's, Berkeley — m., second, Paul Warley. 
iii. Catherine Marion, m. Thomas Whitehouse of 
' Cha rles to wn, S. C., an Englishman who deserted 
his wife, 
iv. Elizabeth Marion, m. Peter Porcher of St. Ste- 
phen's, by whom issue: 
i. Peter who d. in childhood, 
ii. ' Elizabeth, 
iii. Catherine, 
iv. Marianna, 
v. Martha, 

By these daughters Elizabeth Marion Porcher 
was the ancestress of a numerous progeny. 
iv. Job Marion of St. John's, Berkeley, fourth son of Gabriel 
by his wife Esther Cordes, removed to St. John's, 
Berkeley, between 1772 and 1775. He m., first, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Paul St. Julien of Hanover, St. John's, 
who brought him the plantation called "Goshen" 
later owned by Mr. Thomas Porcher of Whitehall; 
he m., second, Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. Theodore 
Gaillard, Sr., and had one son by each wife. With 
his brother Francis, he represented St. John's Parish 
in the Provincial Congress of 1775. His will dated 
8 June, 1778, was proved 29 January, 1779, in which 
he bequeathed to his son Theodore Marion 300 acres 
on which he lived called "Salamton" of ''Harbin's 
Spring," a tract adjoining Harbin's and Mrs. Monck's 
plantation which he bought from Gabriel Marion, 
150 acres called "Johnny's Oldlield" which he bought 
of George Hague, a tract containing 276 acres, another 
containing 500 acres and known as "Stewart Town," 
150 acres which he bought of his brother Gabriel who 
purchased it of Peter Gourdin, two tracts containing 
80 acres bought from Martin LeGrand, 47 acres bought 
from John Boley or Baley making in all eight tracts 



46 



TRANSACTIONS 



V. 



of land adjoining "Harbin." He also devised to this 
son his house and lot in Charleston bought of John 
Harleston, Isaae Harleston, and John Corbot, attor- 
neys of White Outer Bridge, southeast corner of 
Queen and Archdale Streets, and also eight English 
blood horses and colts. 
He had issue: 
By first wife 
i. Job St. Julien Marion, m. Elizabeth Gaillard, and 
had by her a son — 

i. Theodore S. Marion m. Charlotte daughter 
of Gabriel Marion and widow of Anthony 
Ashby, and their daughter Elizabeth 
Marion m. Samuel DuBose and their son 
Theodore S. DuBose m. Jane Porcher. 
By second wife: 

ii. Lydia Marion who died young; 
hi. Theodore Samuel Marion married and left many 
descendants together with his brother Job St. 
Julien. 
Esther Marion, daughter and eldest child of Gabriel by 
his wife Esther Cordes, bore the given name of her 
mother. She m. first, John, eldest child of John and 
Deborah Allston, by whom issue: 

i. Martha Allston, m. Benjamin Young of George- 
town; 
ii. Elizabeth Allston m. Benjamin Simons of St. 

Thomas; 
hi. Esther Cordes Allston d. at eighteen years; 
iv. Eleanor Allston m. Peter Simons brother of Ben- 
jamin ; 
v. Ann d. an infant; 
vi. John Allston d. in infancy. 
After the death of John Allston 1751, Esther Cordes 
Marion m., second, Thomas Mitchell of Georgetown 
and had issue: 



f 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 47 

vi. Sarah Mitchell d. young; 

vii. Sarah Mitchell the second who m., first, Dr. 
William Alexander Ilyme of Georgetown or 
St. Paul's, and m. second, Benjamin Culler of 
Boston, Mass.; 
viii. Elizabeth Mitchell in. Dr. Thomas Waring of 
Georgetown; 
ix. Charlotte Mitchell d. young; 
x. Thomas Mitchell who was aide to his uncle Gen. 
Francis Marion. Thomas Mitchell m. 13 
August, 1778, Ann E. Rothmaler and had 
issue : 
i. Ann d. an infant; 

ii. Charlotte m. her cousin Thomas Mitchell, son 
of Anthony Mitchell by his wife Mary Grier 
of Pedee, and who had issue, Nelson Mitchell, 
a distinguished lawyer of Charleston, S. C, 
and Ann Mitchell m. Dr. William Nelson of 
Albemarle, Va. 
iii. Thomas Rothmaler Mitchell, member of Con- 
gress; 
iv. Nannette Mitchell d. unmarried; 
v. Edward Mitchell, m., first, 9 July, 1782, Mary 
Moore of St. Thomas, and m., second, Anna 
Bowen, daughter of Dr. Ephraim Bowen of 
Providence, R. I. Edward Mitchell d. 16 
April, 1798, and by his first wife had issue: 
i. Edward Mitchell, M.D., of Edisto Island, 
who m. Elizabeth Grimball Baynard and 
had children — John Elias Moore Mitch- 
ell; Wm. Grimball Baynard Mitchell; 
Francis Marion Mitchell m. Eudora 
D wight; Julian Augustus Mitchell, law- 
yer, of the linn of Mitchell and Smith, 
Charleston, S. C.j Mary Baynard Mitch- 
ell; Rachel Louise Mitchell m. Wil- 



48 TRANSACTIONS 

liam Whaley of Edisto Island, later a 
lawyer in Charleston; Ann A. Mitchell; 
and Esther Marion Mitchell. 
Edward Mitchell by his second wife Anna 

Bowen had two children: 
Thomas Clarke Mitchell; and 
Anna Elizabeth Mitchell in. Thomas Newbold 
of London, England. 
vi. General Francis Marion, was the youngest son of 
Gabriel Marion by his wife Esther Cordes. He m. 
Mary Videau but they left no issue. He later adopted 
a nephew or great-nephew Francis J) wight and made 
him his heir on condition that he take his name. The 
life of General Marion has been written by "Weems" 
by " James" and by "Simms" and is so well known 
to all students of the Revolutionary War and Ameri- 
can History that we shall not here elaborate it. 



Benjamin Marion (son of Benjamin the Emigrant, son of 
Jean) was the third child and second son of Benjamin Marion 
by his wife Judith Baluet, and with his sister Esther, and brother 
Gabriel, was registered upon the "liste" in possession of Mr. 
Ravenel, and was b. between the years 1690 and 1695. 

He in. Elizabeth, daughter of William, son of Thomas Cater 
and it is probable he survived his wife. 

His will dated 4 August, 1775, was proved 12 March, 1778, 
in which he mentions the following children : 
i. Benjamin Marion, 
ii. Charles Marion, 
iii. Paul Marion, 
iv. Thomas Marion, 
v. James Marion, 
vi. Joseph Marion, 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



49 



vii. Elizabeth wife of Joseph Greenland, 
viii. Ann Marion, 

ix. Mary Marion. 
Some of these must have left descendants but no mention is 
made of them. 

End. 



50 TRANSACTIONS 

WILL OF BENJAMIN MARION 

(At pages 162-5 of Will Book 1732-37 in Probate Court Charleston County) 

Au Norn du Pere Et du Fils Et du S 4 Esprit Amen. Sachent 
quil ni a rien de plus sertain que La mort ni de plus laser tain 
quelle Lheure Disselle me Trouvent grace au seigneur sain de 
Jugement et Dentendement Jay fait mon Testament comme il 
sent suit Premmierement Je recommande mon Arne a Dieu le 
pricnt.de me faire misericorde pour La mour de mon Sauvcur 
Jesus Christ A le gard de mon Corps Je La bandonne a La 
terre laisen le soin de ma setpulture a ma ferrrme et mes Enfans 

Article Premiere 

A Legard de mes biens Jordonne Premierement que mes 
Executeurs Donneront au Pauvre Cinquante Piece a ceux que 
mes Executeurs Jugeront en auvoir Le plus de besoin Jordonne 
ausy que toute mes Lege times Deptes soit toute Payee 

Article Seconde 

Je Declare que Lors que Jay etably mon fils Gabriel et ma lille 
Gignilleat Je Leur ait Donne en Consience tout ce que Je pouvois 
Leur Donner Alors mais De plus Je Donne A mon fils Gabriel 
une obligation de Deux Cent Cinquante Piece et toute Linterrest 
II sera quite avec mes Enfens Et a Legard de ma fille Gignilleat 
Jauvois Promiss un Naigre a ma pettite fille Ester Ginilleat 
Lors quelle seroit En Age ou Mariee, mais ayant Jugee mieux 
Apropos davoir Plutot une Jeune Naigraisse que Le Naigre 
meme Le pere La Choisy 11 Lon Nome siles Je la donne Dont 
a ma pettite fille Ester Ginilleat En Dispose come Bon luy 
semblera 

Article Troisieme 

Je declare avoir Etably mon fils Jean Et mon fils Benjamin 
Je Leur ait Donnee a chacun sents & Cinque acre de terre des 
terre Que Javois Agete de M r John Gibbs avec chacun trois 
Naigre Besteau Brebis Cheuvaux Cauvalle Enfain tout ce qui 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 51 

faut pour une Nouvclle Plantation mais quand II arrive aprcs 
quelque Annee mon Ills Jean ne Peuvent Rien faire, de sus a 
vendu sa terre a Moris Izard Et Nayent Plus de terre Jay aite 
oblige de Lui Lesser Avoir Lusage de cent Acres que Jay a 
Wasmesaw Joignent Celle que Jay donnee A mon Ills Poul 
Jusque a ce quil soil Pourueux out Conseruera les Chaine Blanc 
Et Rouge que Jennay Grand besoin Pour Lusage de Cette 
Plantation Icy 

Article Quatrieme 

Je declare qua Legard de mon fils Benjamin Je Lui ait Donnee 
tout Au terns Come Jay fait a mon ills Jean En Naigre En terre 
En toute Autre chose mais Quand II Arrive II La Ausy vendu 
sa terre de Cent Et Cinque Acres de terre pour La some de six 
Cent Piece que Jay Achette de Lui maime or voicy Le Paye- 
ment premierement II me deuvoit Deux Cent Piece dont Je 
Le tient Quite Et ses Herittiers Et a Legard des Quatre Cent 
pieces voicy Comme ont fait Benjamin Devoit Au Enfens de 
Defaite Pierre guerain Quatre Cent Piece Le Reste dune Bande 
de huit Cent Piece Sy Bien que le: Reste de Cette obligations 
qui ait Quatre Cent Piece Je La Pren sur moy Pour En faire 
Entierrement le payant ou mes Heritiers Ainsy Je tiens quite 
mon fils Benjamin et ses Ilerritiers le Dechargen Entierrement 
des Six Cent Piece Et ses Hentiers Ainsy La terre de Cent & 
Cinque acres de terre Retourne a moi Pour en disposer selon 
ma volonte 

Article Cinqueieme 

A Legard de mon fils Poul Je Lui ait Donee deux Cent Acres 
de terre a Wasmesaw Goignent Celle Que Jay vendu A Monsieur 
Brathon A disposer A sa volonte II a eu ausy autems de Naigre 
Et toute Autre Choses Come ses on Eu 

Article Sixeme 

A Legard de ma fllle Marie Je declare En La Marrient que 
Je Lui donne Un Naigre qui sappelle Gools Et sa femme Susy et 



52 



TRANSACTIONS 



trois Enfens Presmes Seray et filly Et Les autres Enfans quelle 
Poura Avoir Je Les ait Donnee Avec Autres Choses Pour son 
Menage Le tout A ma fille Marie Pour Ei\ Disposer seiont sa 
volonte 

Article Septieme 

tous Mes Enfens qui sont dehors Et Qui ont Eu Leur Por- 
tions Ne Doivvent Attendre un Joto Dauvantage de se qui 
Reste Jordonne quon a Chete A Ma Pettite fille Nensy une June 
Naigresse de son age Et Quon Lui donne Son Entretiens Et 
son Eccole, 

Article Huitieme 

A Legard de mes Autres trois filles Sawoir Ane Elizabeth Et 
Judic En Les marrient Chacune aura tout autant que Leur 
Soeur Marie ou la Valeurs 



Article Neuveieme 

A Lesgard de ma Chere femme Je Lui Donne papa Giny Et 
ses deux Derniers Enfans savoir Isaac Et Lissete a en Disposer 
selon son Plaisir Mais voicy une rude Article Et ne Puis Men 
Disposer Cest que Sy ma femme venoit a ce Marrier quil faut 
Quelle sorte Avec Ce que Je luy ait Donnee Ses Chevaux Et son 
Menage Ne seroit II Pas Chose Injuste qun Aitranger viendroit 
Dissiper Le bien quil Na point gannee Mais Jay Meilleur 
Opinion de ma femme Et Croy quelle demeurera Veuve Veur- 
tueux Gouvernent sa famile En La Crainte de dieu Comme 
Elle A toujours faite sy" Elle fait Cela Comme Je Lespere Je 
La Constitue Executrix Administratisse avec mon fils Pierre 
Et mon tils Jaque Lors quil sera En Age, de plus Je Donne a 
ma famme tout Les Agneaux Et Vaux Et Et Autre Viande qui 
se vendera au Boucher pour avoir ses Petite Commodite, sur 
toute choses mon Cher iils Pierre Je vous ordonne de Ne Lesser 
Menquer ni vos seurs selon Leurs Condition, Ny votre cher 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 53 

Mere Qui vous A Elevee Avecque Un Sy Grand Douceurs si 
vous Le faite le seigneur vous En Benira Et ores line Bonne 
Reputation En Ce monde Et Cy vous le faite Pas Les Pettis 
Corbeaux du Desert viendront vous Aracher Les yeiix, 

Article Dixeme 

Touchent Quelque Argenterie de Reale bage Pierrerie tout 
ses Petites Choses sont A ma fenune Et pour ma tasse dargent 
Je La Donne a, Mon Pierre Et Pour les Huit Eceus De Poche 
Et Cachette Pierre Et Et Jaques Les Partageront Pour Mes 
Boucle Dergent Je Les Donne a Mon Fils Jaque Et Lors que 
Dieu Ora Retire votre Mere de ce Monde vous ne menqueras 
pas de Lenterrer Contre Moy 

Article ll eme 

Apres done La Mort de ma femme mon fils Pierre Et mon 
Jaques Oront tout Je Leur donne toute mes terres qui sont 
Icy En Gooskric Et Les cent Acres A Wasmesaw tous Les Naigre 
Avec tous Seux qui Sacheteront Jusque au Partage tout Le 
betail Brebis Cheuvaux Et toute Autre Meuble Et Unmeuble 
Pierre doit Avoir Le Choix de deux Plantations Et si Jaque 
venoit A Mourrir sen Enfans Le tout sera A Pierre Meuble Et 
Inmeuble Mais La Meinme Chose doit Aitre Ausy quo si 
Pierre meur sen aitre mariee Le tout sera ausy Meuble Et 
Inmeuble A mon fils Jaque si Mon fils Pierre veut se marrier 
Se la ne Doit Nullement En Paicher Sa femme sera En La 
Maison La meme Chose que ma femme Et mes filles, fait En 
Caroline sur ma Plantation ce 13eme Janvier 173-t 

Article Derniere 

Je Declare que Cecy Ait Mon derniers testament Et que 
toute autre sera de nulle valeur Et Veut qui! soit Exequte de 



54 TRANSACTIONS 

Point en Point En foy de Quoy Jay Signee Et Sele de Mon 
Present seau En Presence de 

B: MAsion L. S. 

Signee Et Selle En Presence 
De 
Peter Guerin 
Jas. Sanders 
Daniel Galiot 

Before the Hon. Thomas Broughton, Esqr., Lieutenent Gov- 
erner, by virtue of a Dedimus to Him Directed, by his Excel- 
lency the Governour, May 2nd, 1735 — Personally came and 
appeared Peter Guerin and Daniel Galiot, being two of the Evi- 
dences to the last will and testament above written, and being 
Duly sworne on the Holy Evangelist, declared they were Present 
and saw the above named Benjamin Marion the testator sign 
seal publish and declare the above Instrument to be and 
contain his last Will and Testament and that he was at the 
same time of sound and disposing mind, memory and under- 
standing, to the best of the deponents knowledge and belief 
and that they severally subscribed their names as witness to- 
gether with James Sanders the other witness In Presence of the 
said testator and at his request. 

Tiios. Broughton, Presdt. 



[Translation of the Will] 

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy 
Spirit, Amen! — Knowing that there is nothing more certain than 
death, nor more uncertain than the hour of it; finding myself, 
thanks to the Lord, sound in judgment and understanding, I have 
made my will, as follows: First I recommend my soul to God, 
praying Him to have mercy on me for the love of my Saviour, 
Jesus Christ. With regard to my body, I commit it to the 
earth, leaving the care of my burial to my wife and my children. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



55 



Article 1 

With regard to my property, I direct, in the first place, that 
my executors shall give to the poor fifty pieces, whom my 
executors shall judge to have the most need of them. I direct 
also that all my lawful debts be all paid up. 

Article 2 

I declare that when I settled my son Gabriel and my daughter 
Gignilleat, I gave them in conscience all that I could then give 
them, but I give, moreover, to my son Gabriel, a Bond of Two 
hundred and fifty pieces and all the interest, — he shall be ac- 
quitted with my children. And with regard to my daughter 
Gignilleat, I promised a negro to my Grand-daughter Ester 
Gignilleat, when she should be of age, or marry. But having 
deemed it more fitting that she should have rather a young 
negress than the said negro, her father has chosen one named 
Siles. I give her therefore to my grand-daughter Ester Gig- 
nilleat to dispose of as to her shall seem good. 

Article 3 



I declare that I have settled my son John and my son Ben- 
jamin. I gave them each one hundred and five acres of the 
land that I bought of Mr. John Gibbs, with three negroes each, 
cattle, sheep, horses, fillies, in short every thing necessary for a 
new plantation. But what has happened, after some years? My 
son John, not having been able to make anything of the same, 
sold his land to Mr. Izard, and he having not more land, I was 
obliged to let him have the use of a hundred acres that I have 
at Wasmesaw joining that which I gave to my son Paul, 
until he should be provided. He must preserve the white and 
red oaks, for I have great need of them for the use of this plan- 
tation here. 



56 transactions 

Article 4 

I declare, that as regards to my son Benjamin, I gave hirn 
every thing the same as I gave my son John, in negroes, in land, 
in all other tilings. But what has happened? lie also has 
sold his tract of one hundred and five acres of land for the sum 
of six hundred pieces, which I bought of him myself; and here 
is the payment— In the first place, he owed me two hundred 
pieces of which I wholly acquit him and his heirs; and with 
regard to the four hundred pieces, here is how it was managed: 
— Benjamin owed the children of the deceased Peter Guerain 
four hundred pieces, the balance of a bond of eight hundred 
pieces — so the residue of the bond, which is four hundred 
pieces, I take on myself to make the entire payment, or my 
heirs — so I hold my son Benjamin -and his heirs acquitted, 
thus discharging him and his heirs entirely from the six hun- 
dred pieces. So the tract of one hundred and five acres of land 
returns to me, to be disposed of according to my pleasure. 

Article 5 

With regard to my son Paul, I gave him two hundred acres 
of land at Wasmesaw joining that which I sold to Mr. Brathon 
to dispose of at his pleasure. He has had also the same, in 
negroes and all other things, as his brothers have had. 

Article 6 

With regard to my daughter Mary, I declare on her marrying 
that I gave her a negro called Gools, and his wife Susy and 
three children Premes, Seray and Filly, and the other children 
that she may have, I gave them to her with other tilings for 
her household — the whole to my daughter Mary to dispose of 
according to her pleasure. 

Article 7 

All my children who are not under my roof, and who have 
received their portions, must not expect one jot more of what 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 57 

remains. I direct that there be bought for my grand-daughter 
Nensy, a young negress of her age and that she be given her 
maintenance and her schooling. 

Article 8 

With regard to my other three daughters, Anne, Elizabeth and 
Judith, on marrying, they shall each have every thing the same 
as their sister Mary has had, or the value. 

Article 9 

With regard to my dear wife, I give her daddy Giny and his 
two last children, namely Isaac and Lissete, to dispose of them 
according to her pleasure. But here is a hard article and I 
cannot dispense with it — if my wife should happen to marry 
[again], she must depart with what I have given her, her horses 
and her furniture. Would it not be an unjust thing that a 
stranger should squander property that he had not earned? 
But I have better opinion of my wife— I believe that she will 
live a virtuous widow, governing her family in the fear of God 
as she has always done. If she does so as I hope, I appoint her 
my executrix, with my son Peter, and my son James when he 
shall be of age. Moreover, I give to my wife all the lambs and 
calves and other provisions which shall be sold to the butcher 
to have her little conveniences. Above all things, my dear son 
Peter, I enjoin you never to let any thing be wanting, neither to 
your sisters, according to their condition, nor your dear mother, 
who has reared you with such a great loving kindness. If you 
do so, the Lord will bless you and you will have a good repu- 
tation in this world, and if you do not, the young ravens of the 
desert will come and pick out your eyes. 

Article 10 

Touching some sterling plate, rings, precious stones — all these 
little things are for my wife; and as to my silver cup I 
give it to my [son] Peter; and as to the eight pocket-crowns and 



58 TRANSACTIONS 

seal, Peter and James shall share them. As to my silver buckles, 
I give them to my son James; — and when God shall take your 
mother from this world, you will not fail to bury her by my 
side. 

Article 11 

After the death of my wife, my son Peter and my [son] James 
shall have every thing. I give them — all my lands which are here 
in Goosecreek, and the hundred acres at Wasmesaw — all the 
negroes, with all those that shall be bought until the division — 
all the cattle, sheep, horses and every thing moveable and 
immoveable. Peter is to have the choice of the two plan- 
tations; and if James should happen to die without children, 
the whole will be for Peter, moveable and immoveable. But 
the same thing must take place also if Peter die, without being 
married — the whole shall be also, moveable and immoveable, 
for my son James. If my son Peter wish to marry, this should 
in no wise prevent — his wife will be in the house the same 
thing as my wife and my daughters. Made in Carolina, on 
my plantation, this 13 th January 1734. 

Article Last 

I declare this to be my last will and any other shall be of no 
effect; and I wish that it be executed to the very letter. In 
faith thereof I have signed and sealed with my present seal in 
presence oi— 

B. Mabion. [L. S.] 
Signed and sealed in presence 
of 
Peter Guerin 
J as. Sanders, 
Daniel Galiot. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 59 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE HUGUENOT 
SOCIETY OF SOUIfl CAROLINA 

CONSTITUTION 

Article I 

Name 

The name of this organization shall be "Tile Huguenot Society or South 
Carolina." 

Article II 
Object 

The object of the Society shall be: 

Firstly, To perpetuate the memory and to foster and promote the principles 
and virtues of the Huguenots. 

Secondly. To publicly commemorate at stated times the principal events in the 
history of the Huguenots. 

Thirdly, To discover, collect and preserve all still existing documents, mon- 
uments, etc., relating to the genealogy or history of the Huguenots of America in 
general, and to those of South Carolina ,in particular. 

Fourthly, To gather by degrees a library for the use of the Society, composed 
of all obtainable books, monographs, pamphlets, manuscripts, etc., relating to the 
Huguenots. 

Fifthly, To cause statedly to be prepared and read before the Society, papers, 
essays, etc., on Huguenot history or genealogy and collateral subjects. 

Article III 
Membership 

Section 1. The membership of this Society shall be as follows: 

Firstly, All descendants in the direct male or female lines of the Huguenot 
families which emigrated to America prior to the promulgation of the Edict of 
Toleration, November 28, 1787. 

Secondly, Representatives of other French families, whose profession of the 
Protestant Faith is anterior to the promulgation of the Edict of Toleration, 
November- 28, 1787. 

Thirdly, Pastors of French Huguenot congregations in South Carolina. 

Fourthly, Writers who have made the history, genealogy, principles, etc., of the 
Huguenots a special subject of study and research, to whatever nationality they 
may belong. 

Section 2. The members of the Society may consist of three classes: Resi- 
dent, Corresponding and Honorary; but the rights and privileges of each class 
shall be the same. 

Section 3. The annual fees of Resident and Corresponding members shall 
be one dollar, and the payment of twenty dollars shall constitute one a life mem- 
ber. All dues shall be paid in advance. 



60 TRANSACTIONS 

Section 4. The funds of this Society shall be applied only to the furtherance 
and realization of the objects contemplated in this constitution. 

Section 5. All life-membership fees shall be invested by the Executive Com- 
mittee (hereinafter provided for) in the name of the Society, and only the interest 
arising therefrom shall be used for the purposes of the Society. 

Section 6. Application for membership, with a statement of the name, 
address, profession, and descent of the applicant, shall be made in writing to 
the Executive Committee, who shall report thereon at the next meeting of the 
Society. 

If the Committee's report be favorable to any applicants, a majority vote of 
the members present shall be required to elect such applicants; but, if the Com- 
mittee's report be unfavorable to any applicants, such unfavorable report shall 
be considered as confirmed without a vote of the Society, unless three members 
object, in which case a vote by ballot shall be taken for each of such applicants 
separately and a two-thirds vote of the members present shall be required to reject 
such unfavorable report and to elect such applicant. Membership shall begin 
with the Anniversary Meeting (April 13) at which the applicant may be elected, 
or (if elected at a meeting other than an Anniversary Meeting) then with the 
Anniversary Meeting next after such other meeting. 

Every application for membership shall be accompanied by one year's dues. 

Article IV 
Officers 

Section 1. The officers of the Society shall consist of a President, a Vice- 
President for each of the seven original Huguenot centres or settlements in South 
Carolina, a Secretary and Treasurer, an Historian, and a Chaplain, and an Execu- 
tive Committee composed of the President and the seven Vice-Presidents and the 
Secretary and Treasurer and the Historian (and all ex-Presidents of the Society 
shall be advisory members of said Committee with all the privileges of member- 
ship except the right to vote). 

Section 2. Besides the ordinary rights and duties of a presiding officer, the 
President shall appoint the plates of meeting; in conjunction with the Secretary 
and Treasurer he shall have the power, and upon the written request of five mem- 
bers it shall be his duty, to call special meetings of the Society, and he shall sign 
all drafts drawn on the Treasurer. 

Section 3. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Presidents to interest in the objects 
of this Society the Huguenots of the localities which they represent; in the absence 
of the President of this Society, a Vice-President shall preside and exercise all the 
rights and privileges of the President; and if more than one Vice-President be 
present, the senior Vice-President in attendance shall be the presiding officer. 

Section 4. It shall be the duty of the Secretary and Treasurer to keep an 
accurate recurd of all the proceedings of the Society and of the Executive Com- 
mittee; to conduct the correspondence of the Society; to notify members of the 
meetings of the Society; to inform officers and new members of their election. 

It shall also be his duty to collect all dues, fees and other moneys belonging to 
the Society, and to deposit the same in some bank in the City of Charleston in 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 61 

the name of the Society. Out of these funds he shall pay such sums only as may 
be ordered by the Society through its President, or the Executive Committee. He 
shall keep an accurate account of its receipts and disbursements, and lender an 
account of the same at each annual meeting of the Society, which shall name a 
committee to audit them. For his services he shall be allowed ten per centum 
of all amounts collected by him. 

Section 5. It shall be the duty of the Historian to have in his keeping all 
books, pamphlets, manuscripts, etc., pertaining or belonging to the Society, and 
to receive and collect data relating to the History of the Huguenots before and 
since their settlement in America. 

Section 6. It shall ,be the duty of the Executive Committee to examine and 
pass upon the credentials of candidates; to invest and manage the funds of the 
Society, to engage suitable persons to deliver the addresses and prepare the papers 
contemplated in this constitution, and to make all other arrangements necessary 
for the meetings of the Society and to transact all business of the Society not 
otherwise provided for in the constitution. 

Section 7. The officers of the Society shall be annually elected at the anni- 
versary meeting; but if any vacancy occur during the year the Executive Com- 
mittee shall have power to appoint a member of the Society to fill such vacancy 
for the unexpired term. 

Article V 
Meetings 

This Society shall hold two regular meetings each year and, in accordance with 
the purpose of the Society, the said meetings shall take place on the following 
historical dates: 

Section 1. The Anniversary Meeting shall be held on April 13, the day of 
the Promulgation of the Edict of Nantes, granting Freedom of Worship to the 
Huguenots of France. 

Section 2. The Autumn Meeting of the Society shall be held on the 22nd of 
October, the day of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. 

Section 3. The Executive Committee shall have the power to arrange for a 
dinner, or other collation, annually, as they may deem most appropriate. 

Section 4. In case any of these dates should fall upon a day inconvenient for 
the proper celebration thereof, the Executive Committee shall appoint for the 
meeting the next most convenient day. 



BY-LAWS 

Section 1. Notices of meetings shall be given at least one week in advance. 

Section 2. It shall always require fifteen members to constitute a quorum for 
the transaction of business. 

Section 3. At all meetings of the Society the order of business shall be as 
follows : 



62 TRANSACTIONS 

Prayer. 

1. The reading and adopting of the minutes of the previous meeting. 

2. Reports of officers. 

3. Report of the Executive Committee. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Reports of special committees. 

6. Miscellaneous business. 

7. Election of officers. 

8. The reading of papers or delivery of addresses before the Society. 

9. Adjournment. 

Section. 4. All resolutions must be presented in writing to the Chair. 

Section 5. If any member neglect or refuse to pay his annual fee for two con- 
secutive years the Treasurer shall report his name to the Executive Committee, 
who may strike his name from the roll of membership. 

Section 6. Such members of the Society as do not themselves bear Huguenot 
names shall add to their own names the Huguenot names through which they claim 
descent. 

It shall be the duty of the Secretary, in addition to his other duties, to keep a 
Jist of the members by card or otherwise and on such list to write after the name 
of each member the name or names of the Huguenots through whom he or she 
claims descent under subdivision "Firstly" of Section 1, Article III of the 
Constitution, as shown by his or her written application for membership — or else 
his or her qualification for membership otherwise than by descent under subdivi- 
sions "Secondly" and "Thirdly" and "Fourthly" of Section 1, Article HI, of 
the Constitution. 

Section 7. The original Huguenot centres or settlements in this State (each 
one of which is entitled to a Vice-President) are as follows: (1) Charleston, (2) 
Goose Creek, (3) Orange Quarter (St. Denis), (4) French Santee, (5) St. John's, 
Berkley, (6) Purysburg, and (7) New Bordeaux. 

Section 8. The Constitution and By-Laws of this Society may be amended 
or repealed at any meeting of the Society by a two-thirds vote; but the changes 
proposed must have been submitted at a previous meeting. They may also be 
amended or repealed by a vote of a majority of all the members of the Executive 
Committee at any meeting during the recess of the Society: Provided, the amend- 
ment so adopted shall be continued at the next meeting of the Society. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 63 



LIST OF MEMBERS 

Members will please inform the Secretary of all changes of residence or ad- 
dress, to insure receipt of Transactions. 

The names in italics at the end of each entry are those of the original Huguenot 
families from which the member derives descent. Any mistakes in the names 
of such original Huguenot families, or otherwise, should be called to the atten- 
tion of the Secretary. 

Names in large capitals are Huguenots of the pure blood after two and a 
quarter centuries. 

* Charter Member. 

r. Resigned. 

d. Died a member. 

H.M . Honorary Member. 

l.m. Life member. 

c. Ceased to be a member for non payment of dues. 

April 14, 1916. .Adams, Arthur, Hartford, Conn Ballinger 

April 19, 1911. Alexander, Mrs. Ethel Witherspoon, Boston, Mass. . . . Trabue, 

Verreuil. 

April 13, 1910. .Alexander, Mrs. Mary E. Richardson, Bath, S. C Mayrant. 

April 19, 1911.. Allen, Mrs. Kathrine Bostick, East Orange, N. J Robert. 

April 2, 1885. . Alleman, Frances II.,* d Legare. 

April 13, 1885 . . Allston, Rev. Benjamin,* J Giber t. 

April 2, 1901 . .Allston, Chas. P., Georgetown, S. C Gibert. 

May 28, 1897. .Alston, Miss Rebecca II., Charleston, S. C, d. .Motte, LaBrosse. 
April 22, 1908 . . Ames, Mrs. Mary Boykin, Baltimore, Md . LeChcvalicr, dt la Plaine. 
April 20, 1906. .Anderson, Miss Claudia Bennett, Charleston, S. C Simons, 

DuPre. 
April 19, 1911 . .Armstrong, Mrs. Josephine Grcsham, Galveston, Tex. .Pickens. 
April 17, 1902 . Aymar, Mrs. Jane V. II., Jersey City, N. J. . . .Simons, LeSerurier, 

Gign illiat, Dit pre. 

April 16, 1913. .Bacot, Madame Celine Bonnet Dorion, Sedan, France 

April 14, 1916. .Bacot, Daniel Norborne, Charleston, S. C Bacot, 

dcSaussure, Peronneau. 
April 13, 1914. Bacot, Miss Ellen M., Charleston, S. C Bacot, deBemiere, 

Eager, deSaussure, Peronncau. 
April 13, 1885. .Bacot, Daniel Huger, Charleston, S. C* Bacot, Huger, 

deSaussure, Peronneau. 
April 14, 1916. .Bacot, Miss Flora Mclver, Charleston, S. C Bacot, 

deSaussure, Peronneau. 
April 15, 1912. .Bacot, George Williams, Charleston, S. C Bacot, 

deSaussure, Peronneau. 

April 15, 1912. .Bacot, Miss Harriet Wainwright, Charleston, S. C Bacot, 

. . Huger, deSaussure, Peronneau. 



64 



April 14 



April 


13, 


1904 


April 


15, 


1912 


April 


13, 


1885 


April 


13, 


1914 


April 


14, 


1916 


April 


13, 


1885 


April 


14, 


1886 


April 


13, 


1885 


April 


13, 


1910 


April 


13, 


1904 


April 


15, 


1912 


April 


13, 


1885 


April 


13, 


1899 


April 
April 
April 


13, 
13, 

5, 


1915 
1914 
1909 



Mar. 31 



April 14, 


1916 


April 15, 


1912 


April 13, 


1905 


April 18, 


1909 


April 14, 


1916 


April 14, 


1916 


April 14, 


1890 


April 13, 


1915 


April 16, 


1913 


April 17, 


1902 


April 13, 


1885 



1886. 



1890. 



TRANSACTIONS 

. Bacot, John Vacher, Morristown, N. J Bacot, deSaussure, 

Peronneau, Vacher. 
.Bacot, Jules dcR., Isle of Hope, Ga., d Band, deSaussure, 

Peronneau. 
Bacot, Miss Julia Iluger, Charleston, S. C Bacot, linger, 

deSaussure, Peronneau. 
.Bacot, Julius Motte, Charleston, S. C.,* d Bacot, linger, 

deSaussure, Peronneau. 
.Bacot, Miss Louisa deBerniere, Charleston, S. C Bacot, 

deBerniere, Iluger, deSaussure, Pe- 
< ronncau. 

.Bacot, Miss Louise W., Charleston, S. C... Bacot, deSaussure, 

Peronneau. 
Bacot, Miss Maria Fraser, Kenosha, Wis.,* d Bacot, 

Peronneau. 
Bacot, Robert Cochran, Jersey City, N. J., d Bacot, 

deSaussure, Peronneau. 
Bacot, Robert Dewar, Charleston, S. C.,* d Bacot, 

deSaussure, Peronneau. 
Bacot, Robert Dewar, Charleston, S. C Bacot, deBerniere, 

Iluger, deSaussure, Peronneau. 
Bacot, Samuel Holloway, Darlingion, S. C, d Bacot, 

Foissin, Peronneau. 
Bacot, Miss Sarah Louisa, Charleston, S. C Bacot, linger, 

deSaussure, Peronneau. 
Bacot, Thomas Wright, Charleston, S. C* Bacut, Iluger, 

deSaussure, Peronneau. 
Bacot, Mrs. Thomas Wright (Louisa deBerniere), Charleston, 

S. C deBerniere. 

Bagnell, Robert Adams, St. Louis, Mo Flour nios. 

Bagnell, Mrs. Sally Ann Adams, St. Louis, Mo Flournios. 

Ball, Mrs. Elias, Charleston, S. C Wazyck, Ravenel, LcNoble, 

de St. J illicit, LeSururier. 
Barker, Theodore G., Charleston, S. C, II. M Cordes, 

Gendron, Serre, Gaillard. 

Barnet, Mrs. James B., Chicago, 111 Quintard. 

Barnes, Mrs. Eva M., Atlanta, Ga. . . . Riverdiex. 

Barr, Mrs. Mary McDonald, c Macon. 

Bassett, Mrs. Caroline DuPuy, Windsor, Mo., d DuPuy, 

LaVillain, La Prade. 

Bassett, Paul A., Waterloo, Iowa DuPuy. 

Bassett, Dr. Samuel T., St. Louis, Mo DuPuy. 

Bayard, Hon. Thomas F., d Bayard. 

Beall, Mrs. John M., Cincinnati, Ohio Maupin. 

Beckman, Dr. G. E., Jacksonville, Fla Gras. 

Beckman, Miss Julia Reese, Charleston, S. C Gras. 

Beckman, Miss Serena B., Charleston, S. C.*, d Gras. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



65 



April 20 
April 17 



April 13, 1910. .Beckwith, Mrs. Videau Marion Legare, Charleston, S. C.Legare, 

Marian, Gcudran, Curclcs, Pare her, 
deMarboeuj, Cakusac, Mazyck, Cou- 
turier. 
1906. .Belcher, Mrs. A. C. F., St. Louis, Mo Macon. 

1902. .Bennett, Mrs. John M., San Antonio, Texas. . .Bunueau, DuBliss, 

deLongueniare, Koi. 

Bennett, Mrs. John, Charleston, S. C. . .Furquand, C our tonne. 

. Benry, Mrs. Joseph E., Macdonald, W. Va Horry. 

. Berryrnan, Mrs. Charlotte Cazenove, Alexandria, Va., d 

de Cazcnove. 

Berliner, Mrs. S. L., Texarkana, Ark Porcher, DeBlancs. 

.Biggs, R. K., Jr., Aux Vasse, Miss Desasurde, Perroretle, 

de Crockctagne. 

Black, Miss Emma C, Charleston, S. C, d de.Ledeine. 

.Blackburn, Mrs. George A., Columbia, S. C Girardeau. 

.Blackman, Mrs. E. L., Greenville, S. C.,d Robert. 

Blackshear, Miss Anna Baber, Macon, Ga F 'archer. 

. Blackshear, Miss Mary Baber, Macon, Ga Forcher. 

.Blackshear, Mrs. J. E., Macon, Ga., r Gignilliat. 

. Bondurant, Dr. E. D., Mobile, Ala DuBose. 

. Bonneau, F. N., Charleston, S. C, d Bonneau. 

.Bonneau, Miss Marguerite, Clemson College, S. C Bonneau. 

Bonneau, W. E., Charleston, S. C, d Bonneau. 

.Bdstick, A. McQ., Bamberg, S.C., d Robert. 

. Bostick, Benjamin Robert, New York, N. Y Robert. 

.Bostick, Smith Mott., Syracuse, N. Y Robert. 

.Bounetheau, Harold DuPre, Boston, Mass.. .Bounetheau, DuPre. 

.Bounetheau, Henry D., d Bounetheau. 

.Bowley, Mrs. J. V. G., -Charleston, S. C. . . DuPre, LcStrurier, 
Legcr, Gignilliat, DuBliss. 

1905. Bowley, E„ Ilcyward, Charleston, S. C LcStrurier, DuPre, 

Legcr, Gignilliat, DuBliss. 

.Box, Miss Rosa, Charleston, S. C.,* r Gaillard. 

.Boyd, Mrs. Mary R. G., Yatesville, Ga Guerry, Broussard. 

.Boykin, Sarah J., Camden, S. C* d * deSaussurc. 

.Bracq, Jean Charlemagne, Editor "Huguenot Quarterly," 

Poughkeepsie, N. . Y., r Bracq. 

.Bragonier, Fred Tyler, Kingman, Arizona .Pecunier. 

.Brent, George A., Louisville, Ky Mauze. 

. Broun, E. Fontaine, Charleston, W. Va Boursequot, 

Fontaine, Broun. 

1886. .Broun, Mrs. Mary M., Charleston, W. Va., d Boursequot, 

Fontaine, Broun. 
1886. Broun, Thomas L., Charleston, W. Va., d. .Boursequot, Broun. 

1903 . . Brown, Dr. Paul R., d de Bruyn. 

1916. Brown, Dr. William S., Charleston, S. C Postell, Papin, 

Bo nd i not, Vcrgcreau. 



April 14, 


1916 


April 14, 


1916 


April 19 


1911 


April 16 


1913 


May 22, 


1916 


April 15 


1909 


April 14 


1916 


April 14, 


1890 


April 14 


1916 


April 14 


1916 


Mar. 8 


1895 


Oct. 22 


1898 


April 2 


1890 


April 14 


1916 


April 2 


1890 


April 14 


1890 


April 19 


1911 


April 13 


1915 


April 17 


1902 


July 14 


1896 


June 25 


1894 



April 13 



April 2 


1885 


April 14 


1916 


April 13 


1885 


Nov. 4, 


1899 


April 15 


1907 


April 20 


1906 


April 17 


1902 



April 14 

April 14 
July 2 
April 14 



66 



TRANSACTIONS 



June 1 1 
June 1 1 
April 20 

April 15 

April 14 
April 15 
April 13 

April 22 

April 19 



April 14, 


1890 


Mar. 21, 


1903 


April 2, 


1885 


April 13 


1901 


April 2, 


1885 


April 13, 


1885 


April 2, 


1885 


April 2, 


1901 


April 14, 


1916 


April 19, 


1911 



April 19 

April 13 

April 15 

April 13 

April 13 

April 13 

April 13 



April 


13, 


1885 


April 


13, 


1885 


April 


13, 


1915 


April 


14, 


1916 


April 


13, 


1903 


April 


14, 


1916 


April 


13, 


1914 


April 


15, 


1912 


April 


12, 


1899 



1898. 
1898. 
1906. 

1912. 

1916. 
1912. 
1905. 

1908. 

1911. 



1911 

1904 
1909 

1885 
1914 

1885 

1S85 



.Brunson, H. A., Florence, S. C, c. . . .Bacot, Foissin, Peronneau. 
.Brunson, II. M., Florence, S. C, c. . . .Bacot, Foissin, Peronneau. 
.Brunson, Mrs. Mary Motte, Florence, S. C, c Bacot, 

Foissin, Peronneau. 
.Brunson, Mason Chandler, Florence, S. C, c Bacol, 

Foissin, Peronneau. 

.Brunson, Miss Sophia B., Sumter, S. C Bacot. 

.Bryan, Miss Laura Lane, Charleston, S. C Sherrard. 

. Bryan, Mrs. Alary Mclver, Savannah, Ga., c Bacot, 

deSaussure, Peronneau. 
.Bryce, Mrs. Ellen Peter, Tuscaloosa, Ala Horry, LaRoche, 

Simons, DuPre. 
.Buffington, Mrs. M. Alton, Fall River, Mass Traube, 

Guerrant, Martin. 

. Buist, Dr. J. Somers, Charleston, S. C, d Legare. 

.Bulloch, Dr. Joseph G. B., Washington, D. C. .deVeaux, Maine. 

.Burdell, Miss Alice M., Charleston, S. C* Marion. 

.Burdell, Edwin T., Savannah, Ga., c Marion. 

.Burdell, F. M.,* d Marion. 

. Burdell, Robert F.,* d. Marion. 

. Burdell, Thad $.,* d Marion. 

. Burton, Robert W., Auburn, Ala Robert. 

.Butler, Mrs. M. C, New York, N. Y Robert. 

.Butler, Miss Jessie, Georgetown, S. C, c Bacot, Foissin, 

Peronneau. 
Butler, LeRoy H., Georgetown, S. C, c Bacot, Foissin, 

Peronneau. 

.Butler, Mrs. Jessie T., c Bacot, Foissin, Peronneau. 

.Burton, Miss Louise Screven, Los Angeles, Cal., r Robert. 

. Caldwell, Wm. Robinson,* d Thorn js. 

Calhoun, Mrs. F. H. IL, Clemson College, S. C Sabin. 

.Campbell, Miss Celia,* d Sigourney, Gcrmaine, 

Pair an, DuPre. 
Campbell, Miss Alary Bennett, Charleston, S. C.,* d 

Sigourney, Gcrmaine, Pairan, Du- 
Pre. 

.Campbell, -Miss Mary Butler,* d Sigourney, Pairan. 

.Carrere, Mrs. Elizabeth Calhoun,* d Scgur. 

.Charles, Miss Emelie Leslie, Darlington, S. C Bacot, 

Foissin, Peronneau. 

.Carlisle, Mrs. H. B., Spartanburg, S. C Gabeau. 

. Charles, Robert K., d DuBose. 

. Charles R. Keiih, Timmonsville, S. C DuBose. 

.Carrier, William Bruce, Yaldosta, Ga Touneur, Jaquet, 

DeCarpentia. 

.Carson, James Petigrew, Charleston, S. C Giber I. 

.Chase, John A., Florence, S. C, r. . . .Bacot, Foissin, Peronneau. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



67 



April 13, 


1903 


April 14, 


1916 


April 13, 


1914 


April 10, 


1890 


April 11, 


1890 


April 13, 


1905 


April 21, 


1900 


April 13, 


1903 


April 13, 


1903 


April 13, 


1888 


April 14, 


1916 


April 13, 


1905 


April 13, 


1901 


April 15, 


1907 


April 14, 


1916 


April 15, 


1907 


April 14, 


1916 


April 14, 


1916 


April 13, 


1904 


April 13, 


1901 


April 14, 


1916 


April 20, 


1906 


April 13, 


1904 


April 18, 


1909 


April 13, 


1885 


April 13, 


1885 


Oct. 29, 


1899 


April 14, 


1916 


April 17, 


1902 



April 13 

April 13 

April 16 

April 13 



1915 

1905 
1913 
1910 



April 13, 1915 



. Cheves, Mrs. C. McCord, Charleston, S. C Turquand. 

. Child, Mrs. Jesse, Richmond, Mo Micheau. 

.Chisolm, Alexander Hex., New Orleans, La Prioleau. 

.Chisolm, Dr. J. Bachman, Charleston, S. C, II. M., d. .Gcndrun, 

Prioleau. 
.Chisolm, Henry Louis, Charleston, S. C, d. . . .Gendron, Prioleau. 
.Clarke, Rev. James W., Richmond, Va LeGrand, Robert, 

Bocquet. 
.Clark, Mrs. J. Calhoun, Atlanta, Ga Robert, Broye, Jaudon, 

LeGrand, deMangreville. 
.Clarkson, Heriot, Charlotte, N. C. . .Simons, Horry, LaRoche, 

DuPre, Marion. 
.Clearwater, Hon. Alphonso T., l.m., Kingston, N. Y. . .Baudoin, 

Corquet, Doiau (Deyo), Nicol, 

Seguine, Vergooy. 

.Clement, J. W. Legare, Young's Island, S. C, d Legare. 

.Cockrell, Mrs. W. Chenault, Louisville, Ky DuPuy. 

.Colcock, Charles Jones, Charleston, S. C Marion, Baluet. 

.Colcock, Daniel deSaussure, New Orleans, La Bacot, 

deSaussure, Peronneau. 

.Cole, Charles L., Pittsburgh, Pa., l.m Jacquet. 

. Cole, Charles L., Jr., Minneapolis, Minn Jacquet. 

.Cole, Miss Edith Granger, Pittsburgh, Pa Jacquet. 

.Coleman, Mrs. W. II., Columbia, S. C Trezevant. 

. Collins, Miss Phyllis, Charleston, W. Va Horry. 

. Collins, Mrs. Lucy G., Charleston, W. Va Horry. 

.Connerat, William IL, Jr., Savannah, Ga., c Robert. 

.Conlon, Mrs. John J., Hannibal, Mo. ..... .DuPuy, La Villain, 

Trabue. 

.Cooper, W. B., Wilmington, N. C Jeanerette. 

Cooper, Noah W., Nashville, Tenn., r Jeanerette. 

.Cordes, Alexander Watson, Sr., Savannah, Ga Cordes. 

. Coste, A. L.,* d ' Carte. 

. Coste, R. C, Charleston, S. C.,* d Coste. 

.Coutant, Dr. Richard B., Tarrytown, N. Y Coutant. 

.Crow, Mrs. Madsion, San Antonio, Texas de la II ante. 

.Cummings, Mrs. Rosa W., Columbia, S. C, r Bounetheau, 

Legare. 
. Cummings, Miss Anne Bacot, Wilmington, N. C Bacot, 

Foissin, Peronneau. 

.Cunningham, Miss Sarah, Aiken, S. C Gibeit. 

.Curry, Mrs. C. IL, Topeka, Kansas Popino. 

. Cuthbert, Mrs. Eloise Waties Mayrant, Summerville, S. C 

Mayranl, Gui guard, DeLeiseline, 

Ltger, Gaillard, Paparel, Le Ser- 

urier. 
. Culbertson, Mrs. William S., Lousiville, Ky Flour nois 



68 



TRANSACTIONS 



April 13, 


1885 


April 19, 


1911 


April 13, 


1905 


April 14, 


1916 


April 14 


1916 


April 13 


1910 


April 2 


1885 


April 14, 


1916 


April 13 


1902 


Mar. 21 


1890 


April 13 


1915 


April 13 


1910 


April 13 


1914 


July 12, 


1897 


April 7 


1890 


April 16 


1913 


April 7 


1890 


April 13 


1885 


April 2 


1885 


April 2 


1885 


April 14 


1916 



April 2 
April 13 



April 


14 


1890 


April 


2 


18S5 


April 


13 


IMS 5 


April 


13 


1885 


April, 


2 


1885 


April 


2 


1885 


April 


2 


1885 


April 


13 


1885 


April 


2 


1885 


April 


2 


1885 


April 


J 3 


1903 


April 


2 


1885 


April 


2 


1885 


July 


12 


1897 


April 


14 


1916 



1885 



1915 



.Cuttino, David B., Rock Hill, S. C, r * Cothoneau. 

. Cllttino, John S., Columbia, S. C. Cothoneau. 

. Dabney, Mrs. E. B., Vicksburg, Miss Robert, Ilugucnin. 

.Dargan, A. S., Darlington, S. C Bacot, Foissin, Peronneau. 

.Dargan, George Edwin, Darlington, S. C Bacot, Foissin, 

Peronneau. 

.Davant, C. F., Tucson, Ariz Davant. 

.Davarit, J. C, Barnwell, S. C.,* d Davant. 

.Davis, Mrs. E. M. A., Lexington, Mo DuPuy, la Villon. 

.'Davisson, Mrs. Rheta Witte, Harlem, Ga. .Bounetheau, Legare. 
.Dawson, N. H. R., d linger, Motte, Cordes, Pcrdriau, 

Rassin or Rufni, Richet. 

.Delafield, Mrs. Wallace, St. Louis, Mo. Cocke. 

.Delaplaine, Louis S., Wheeling, W. Va de la Plaine. 

.duPont, Hon. H. A., Winterthur, Del du Pont. 

. DeRichemond, Louis Meschinet, la Rochelle Prance, II. M. 

.DeRosset, A. T., r de Rosset. 

DeRosset, Rev. F. A., Charleston, S. C, d deRosset. 

.DeRosset, Wrn., r deRosset. 

.DeSaussure, Miss Fannie E., Charleston, S. C.,* d. .deSaussure. 
. DeSaussure, Henry A.,* Charleston, S. C.,* d DeSaussure, 

Gourd in. 
.DeSaussure, Dr. Henry W.,* d . DeSaussure, Peronneau, Huger. 
.DeSaussure, Dr. Henry W., Charleston, S. C deSaussure, 

Peronneau, Huger. 
.DeSaussure, Miss Isabel A.,* Charleston, S. C deSaussure, 

Gourdin. 
DeSaussure, Dr. Richard L., Washington, D. C deSaussure, 

Peronneau, linger. 

.DeSaussure, James D., d deSaussure, Peronneau. 

. 1 >eSaussure, John B.* deSaussure, Gourdin. 

DeSaussure, Louis 1).,* </ deSaussure. 

. DeSaussure, Louis D., Jr.,* r deSaussure. 

.DeSaussure, Mrs. Martha G., Charleston, S. C.,* II. M., d. 

Gourdin. 

.DeSaussure, Miss Martha G.,* d deSaussure, Gourdin. 

.DeSaussure, Miss Mary C.,* d deSaussure, Peronneau. 

.DeSaussure, Mrs. Sarah E., Charleston, S. C* d . . .deSaussure. 
.DeSaussure, Miss Sarah E., Charleston, S. C.,* d. . .deSaussure, 

Gourdin. 

.DeSaussure, Dr. P. G.,* d deSaussure, Gourdin. 

.DeSaussure, William P., Richmond, Va deSaussure, 

Pironneau. 

.DeSaussure, Wilmot G.,* d deSaussure. 

.DeSaussure, Wilmot G., Jr.,* r deSaussure, Gourdin. 

.DeVeaux, Henri, Bordeaux, France, II. M DeVeaux. 

.De Vane, Miss Lilian, Red Springs, N. C De Vane. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



69 



Feb. 2, 1887. .Dibble, Samuel, Orangeburg, S. C, d Gabeau. 

April 13, 1914.. Dixon, Mrs. Charles J. Biddle, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Xavier. 

. Doar, David, Santee, S. C Cordes. 

.Doar, Mrs. Ulric Huguenin, Lakeland, Fla Curdes. 

.Downing, Mrs. George C, Frankfort, Ky DuPuy. 

.DuBois, Orin B., Weekawken, N. J DuBois. 

.DuBose, Miss Mary P., Monteagle, Tenn., r DuBose. 

DuBose, Allison P., Easley, S. C DuBose. 

.DuBose, Robert M., Sewanee, Tenn., c DuBose, 1 J archer. 

.DuBose, Rev. W. Haskell, Monteagle, Tenn DuBase, 

Pcronneau, Porcher. 
DuBose, Rev. W. P., D.D., Sewanee, Tenn. . . .DuBose, Parcher. 
.DuBose, Miss Susan P., Monteagle, Tenn., r DuBose, 

Peronneau, Porcher. 

.DuBose, Miss Willie S., Savannah, Ga DuBase. 

. Doerzbach, Mrs. Belle Rodgers, Sandusky, Ohio Papineau. 

.Due, Miss P. M., Charleston, S. C.,* l.m luber. 

.Dudley, Mrs. Juliette L., Philadelphia, Pa Robert. 

.Dunbar, Mrs. J. R., Ellenton, S. C, d Gendran, Chardon, 

Motte, Prioleau. 

.Dunbar, Ralph, Ellenton, S. C Priohau. 

.Duncan, Mrs. John M., San Antonio, Texas Legare, 

De la Haute. 
.Dunkin, W. H., Charleston, S. C, r . . .linger, Broun, Cordes, 

Pcrdriau, Rassiu or Rufin, Richet. 

.DuPre, Belin Clarke, Columbia, S. C Berlin, DuPre. 

.DuPre, Prof. J. F. C, d DuPre. 

.Durant, Mrs. E. W., Jr., Charleston, S. C Bierne. 

. Dwight, Charles Stevens, Columbia, S. C Parcher, 

DuBose, Marion. 

.Dwight, C. S., Jr., Charleston, S. C Marion. 

DWIGHT, MRS. R. V., Pinopolis, S. C Round, Porcher. 

Mazyck, LcNoble, Marion, Baluet, 

Le Serurier, de St. Julien. 

.Dwight, Dr. R. Y., Pinopolis, S. C Marion, Baluet. 

.Dwight, Henry R., Pinopolis, S. C Baluet, Ravenel, 

de St. Julian, Mazyck, LeNoble, 

Le Serurier, Parcher. 

.Dwight, D. G., Charleston, S. C, c Marian. 

.Elliott, Miss Annie Fluger, Washington, D. C. .linger, DeVeaux. 

Elliott, Miss Kate, Washington, D. C linger, DeVeaux. 

.Ellis, Frampton E., Atlanta, Ga Gcndron, Chardon, Motte, 

Prioleau. 
Nov. 1, 1897 . . Ellis, Mrs. Phoebe P., Atlanta, Ga . . . Prioleau, Gendran, Chardon, 

Motte. 



April 15 


1907 


April 15 


1907 


April 14, 


1916 


April 14 


1916 


May 4, 


1897 


April 14, 


1916 


April 22, 


1897 


May 14 


1897 


April 22 


1897 


May 4 


1897 


April 15, 


1907 


April 13 


1915 


April 13 


1885 


April 13 


1915 


Nov. 15 


1897 


April 16 


1913 


April 13 


1910 



April 13 

April 13 
May 24 
April 13 
April 16 

April 16 
April 15 



April 15 
April 15 



April 15 
April 14 
April 14 
June 6 



1894. 

1902. 
1898. 
1909. 
1913. 

1913. 
1907. 



1907 
1907 



1907 
1916 
1916 

1899 



70 TRANSACTIONS 

Nov. 1, 1897. .Ellis, Prioleau, Springfield, Mass Priolcau, Gendron, 

Char dan, Matte. 
April 13, 1914. Elmore, Mrs. Samuel E. (Jane McCrady), Evansville, Ind . . . . 

Bucot, de Berniere, linger, dt Saus- 

sure, Peronneau. 
April 19, 1911. Ermantrout, Miss Adelaide Louise Washington, Reading, Pa., r. 

DeBarrt. 

April 13, 1910. .Evans, Mrs. Charles Clark, Sedalia, Mo Boulan. 

April 15, 1912 .Eaison, Mrs. J. A., Bennettsville, S. C Milner, Legare. 

April 13, 1894. .Faulkner, Mrs. M. G., New York., N. Y., L.M Gaillurd. 

April 13, 1914. . Sickling, Miss Eva Lillian, Macon, Ga Gras. 

April 20, 1906. .Finger, Watson Cordes, Charleston, S. C Cordes. 

April 20, 1906. .Finger, Mrs. C. B. C, Charleston, S. C Cordes. 

Mar. 29, 1889. .Fishburne, Mrs. Helen M., Summerville, S. C, c Marion, 

M.azyck. 
April 20, 1906. .Fishburne, Miss Caroline D'Arcy, Washington, D. C, c. .Poslell, 

Pepin. 
April 20, 1906. .Fishburne, Benjamin Postell, Washington, D. C, c. .. .Posted, 

Pepin. 
April 14, 1916. .Flickinger, Mrs. Louise, Little Rock, Ark DuTreux, 

Marvin, Bonton. 

April 13, 1914. .Fisher, Mrs. Samuel T., Washington, D. C Robert. 

April 13, 1894. . FitzSimons, W. Huger, Charleston, S. C, r Gaillard, 

Cordes, Gendron, Serre. 

April 13, 1904. .Farley, Mrs. Sarah C. C, Austin, Texas Bonneau, Roi. 

Oct. 30, 1885. .Fludd, Mrs. Eliza K., d Legarc. 

April 22, 1908. .Ford, Mrs. Marion J., d Porcher. 

April 13, 1905. .Ford, Mrs. F. W., Georgetown, S. C, c Horry, Huger. 

April 15, 1889. .Foster, Henry P., Summerville, S. C, r Poyas, Gendron. 

April 13, 1914. .Fox, Mrs. R. P., Wichita Falls, Texas Parrot, Beauford, 

Trabue, Yeril. 

May 30, 1890. Frost, E. Horry, d LeJau, Horry. 

April 13, 1899. Frost, Frank Ravenel, Charleston, S. C Ravenel, LeJau, 

Horry, de St. J id i en. 

April 13, 1904. . Frost, Dr. F. L., d LeJau, Horry. 

Aug. 7, 1899. .Frost, Mrs. W. Branford, Charleston, S. C, c. . . . Huger, 

Cordes, Perdriau, Russia or Rujin, 

Richet. 
May 22, 1916. .Gadsden, Miss Anzolette P., Lexington, Va. . .Porcher, Gaillard. 

May 22, 1916. .Gadsden, Miss Ellinor P., Lexington, Va Porcher, Gaillard. 

May .30, 1890. Gaillard, Col. David DuBose, d DuBose, Johin, Gaillard, 

LeClair, Gendron, Baluel, Boyd. 
April 13, 1910. .Gaillard, David St. Pierre, Chicago, 111 DuBose, 

Gaillard, Boyd. 

April 21, 1900. .Gaillard, Miss E. G., Charleston, S. C, r Gaillard. 

May 30, 1890. .Gaillard, Henry T., St. Augustine, Fla., c Gaillard. 

April 14, 1916. .Gaillard, Peter C, Ferguson, S. C Gaillard. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



71 



July 12, 1897 

April 2, 1885 

April 13, 1891 

April 19, 1911 



Dec. 



1887 



1903 



April 13 


1904 


April 20 


1906 


July 14 


1897 


April 13 


1901 


April 2 


1885 


July 16 


, 1897 


April 22 


1908 


April 14 


1916 


April 14 


1916 


April 13 


1915 


April 13 


1915 


April 13 


1914 


April 14 


1916 


April 2 


1885 


April 15 


1912 


April 16 


1913 


April 16 


1913 


April 16 


1913 


April 20 


1906 


April 11, 


1898 


April 2 


1885 


April 2 


1885 


April 15 


1912 


April 16 


1913 


April 13 


1905 


April 13, 


1914 


April 19 


1911 


April 9 


1890 


April 13, 


1914 


April 14, 


1916 


April 2, 


1885 


July 24 


1890 


April 13 


1901 


April 16 


1913 



. Gaillard, John, Mobile, Ala Gaillard. 

.GAILLARD, P. C.,* d Gaillard, deChcrigny, 

Mazyck, Le Scrurier. 

Gaillard, Miss Rebecca T., Charleston, S. C., d Gaillard. 

.Gaillard, Mrs. Maria Ravenel, Charleston, S. C Kavenel, 

DeVeaux, Mazyck, St. Julicn, 

Le Seruricr, Le Noble, Porcher. 
.Gaillard, S. Gourdin, Philadelphia, Pa Gaillard, 

De Richebuurg, Gourdin, Porcher, 

.Gaillard, Dr. W. Minot, Georgetown, S. C, c Gaillard. 

.Gaillard, George Caldwell, Mobile, Ala., c Gaillard. 

. Gaillard, Miss Ellinor P., Manning, S. C Gaillard. 

.Gaillard, Samuel P., Mobile, Ala De Richehourg, Porcher, 

Gendron, Mazyck. 

.Gaillard, Wm. D., New York, N. Y Gaillard. 

. Gaillard, Wm. H. D.,* d Gaillard. 

. Gaillard, Wm. M., Mobile, Ala., c Gaillard. 

.Gait, Mrs. Mary J., Williamsburg, Va Servient. 

.Gayle, Mrs. E. O., Shreveport, La De La Hnnte. 

.Geiger, Mrs. D. D., Huntington, W. Va Trabue, Vermil. 

. Gibert, Alexander Hamilton, Jr., Ridgeway, S. C Gibert. 

.Gibert, Alexander Hunter, Granitesville, S. C Gibert. 

. Gibert, Pierre, Greenwood, S. C Gibert. 

.Gibert, Paul Carrington, Augusta, Ga Gibert. 

.Gibert, J. A., Abbeville, S. C.*d Gibert. 

. Gibbs, James Poyas, New York, N. Y Poyas. 

.Gibson, Mrs. S. P., Red Springs, N. C Milner, Legart. 

. Gibson, Thos. Fener, Niagara Falls, N. Y ...... . Milner, Legare. 

.Gibson, Mrs. J. M., Dillon, S. C Legare, Milner. 

. Gignilliat, L. R., Culver, Ala Gignilliat. 

.Gourdin, Mrs. A. B., Charleston, S. C Le Grand, Jaudon, 

Broye, Robert, deMangreville. 

.Gourdin, John K., Charleston, S. C.,* d Gourdin. 

. Gourdin, R. N., Charleston, S. C,* d Gourdin. 

.Cranberry, Mrs. Mary Lee Brown, Jackson, Miss La Force. 

.Gray, Mrs. Benj. F., Jr., St. Louis, Mo DuPuy. 

.Greer, Mrs. Mary P., New Castle, Pa., d Poinsett. 

.Gregorie, Miss Anne King, Mt. Pleasant, S. C Porcher. 

.Gresham, Mrs. Josephine Mann, Galveston, Texas Pickens. 

.Grimke, Dr. T. S., Charleston, S. C, d Faucheraud. 

.Grisreiter, Mrs. Linda C, Pine Bluff, Ark. . . .La Rue or Larew. 

. Gue>ard, Albert Sidney, Asheville, N. C G-ufrard. 

. Guerard, Dr. A. R., Flat Rock, N. C.,* r Guirard. 

. Gueiard, E. P., Charleston, S. C Guerard, Gaillard, 

Godin, Mazyck, Le Seruricr. 

.Gu6rard, Mrs. E. P., Charleston, S. C Benezet. 

.Guerard, E. P., Jr., Charleston, S. C, d Gutrard, BeneztL 



72 TRANSACTIONS 

April 13, 1885. .Guerard, VVm. Bull., d Guerard. 

April 2, 1901. .Guerard, Wm. Elliott, Savannah, Ga., d Mazyck, Guerard, 

Le Serurier, God in. 
April 13, 1914. . Guerry, Homer, Washington, I). C. Guerri, Renibert , 

DuPont, Michau. 
April 14, 1916. .Guerry, DuPont, Jr., Greenville, S. C Guerri, DuPont, 

Michau. 

April 14, 1916. .Guerry, Edgar Lynne, El Paso, Texas Guerry. 

May 13, 1899. .Guignard, John G., Columbia, S. C, d. . . .Guignard, DeLcdciue. 

Jan. 30, 1899. . Guignard, Maj. Wm. S., Columbia, S. C Guignard. 

May 30, 1890. .Guilleteau, Peter L., d Guillelcau. 

July 12, 1897. .Haig, M. de Lisle, Charleston, S. C de la Motte, Chastaigner, 

Mazyck, Buretel, de St. Julien, 

LeSerurier. 
April 13, 1902. .Haig, Miss Mary Maham, Charleston, S. C de la Motte, 

Chastaigner, Mazyck, Buretd, de St. 

Julien, LeSerurier. 
Oct. 30, 1885. .Hall, Mrs. Harriet O., Columbia, S. C, d. Huger, Motte, Cordes, 

Perdriau, Rassin or Rufin, Richet. 

April 15, 1912. .Hall, Mrs. Lillian Popenoe, Lawrence, Kans Papineau. 

April 14, 1916. .Hall, William S., Hannibal, Mo Trezevant. 

April 14, 1916. .Halsey, Mrs. D. S., Charleston, S. C Broun. 

April 15, 1907. .Hamby, Mrs. Elizabeth McN., Columbia, S. C, c Gaillard, 

Serre. 
April 14, 1916. .Hamacher, Mrs. Mary Bassett, Windsor, Mo DuPuy, 

La Vcllon. 

May 1, 1897. .Hamilton, J. G., Mobile, Ala Gaillard. 

May 30, 1890. Harleston, John, Charleston, S. C, r linger, Cordes, 

Perdriau, Rassin or Rufin, Richet. 

May 22, 1916. .Harris, Mrs. Gertrude Garrord, Mobile, Ala Garrord. 

April 13, 1915. .Harrison, Miss Adeline, St. Louis, Mo de Crocketague. 

April 13, 1914. .Harrison, Miss Elizabeth Gibert, Anderson, S. C Gib;rt. 

April 14, 191o. llarvin, J. Bates, Charleston, S. C Thomas. 

April 13, 1914. . llarvin, Mrs. Mary Amanda, Charleston, S. C Thomas. 

April 14, 1916 .llarvin, Stephen Thomas, Charleston, S. C lliomas. 

April 13, 1904. .Harrison, Mrs. James Randolph, New York, N..Y . .Stuyvesant, 

Bayard. 

April 14, 1916. .Harris, Graham N., Chicago, 111 .Gabril, Man pin. 

April 13, 1902. .Hayne, P. Trapier, Greenville, S. C, c DuGue, Trapier. 

April 22, 1908. .Hazelhurst, Mrs. Louise DuBose, Macon, Ga DuBose. 

April 13, 1915. .Heard, Mrs. Silas Wright, St. Louis, Mo Maupin. 

April 13, 1916. Henderson, Walter F., Fulton, Mo de Crocketague. 

April 14, 1916. .Henley, Miss Elizabeth W. D., New York, N. Y Horry. 

Alar. 19, 1911 . .Henry, Mrs. Chas. P., Reading, Pa De Barre. 

April 15, 1909. Tlillhoise, Rev. J. B., Abbeville, S. C Gibert. 

April 14, 1916. .Hillhouse, Miss Susan I., Calhoun, Ga.. . . Gibert. 

April 14, 1890. .Hill, Mrs. J. Louise, Highlands, N. C Gibert. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 73 

April 14, 1914. .Hirsch, Arthur If., Sioux City, Iowa Writer of Huguenot 

History. 

April 14, 1916. .Hocker, Miss Willie, Pine Bluff, Ark Dabney. 

April .22, 1908. .Hodgkins, Mrs. Howard L., Washington, D. C DuPuy, 

LeVillier. 

April 13, 1914. .Holliday, Mrs. Lucy R. F., Indianapolis, Ind., d Macon. 

April 13, 1910. .Holliday, Jacquelin Smith, Indianapolis, Ind., r Jacquelin. 

April 13, 1915..Hollister, Mrs. Charles li. f St. Louis, Mo de Crocketague.. 

April 16, 1913. .Holmes, Miss C. R., Charleston, S. C. . . Perouneau. 

April 13, 1899. .Holmes, George S., Charleston, S. C Perouneau. 

April 13, 1899. .Holmes, James G., Charleston, S. C, r . .Perouneau. 

April 13, 1885. .Holmes, Miss Rebecca T.,* d dcSaussurc, Perouneau 

April 12, 1890. .Horlbeck, Dr. H. 13., Charleston, S. C, d Porchcr, 

dcCherigny. 
April 2, 1908. . Houghton, Mrs. D. B., Charleston, S. C PorcJier, 

deCheriguy, DuPre. 

April 16, 1913. .Howe, Miss Dora, Charleston, S. C Gros. 

April 16, 1913. .Howe, Mrs. J. C. G., Charleston, S. C Bcllamie. 

April 14, 1916. .Howe, Gedney M., Charleston, S. C Gros. 

June 11, 1896. .Huger, Benjamin, Charleston, S. C, r. . . .Huger, Broun, Cordes, 

Perdriau, Rassin or Rufui, Richet. 
April 2, 1885 . .Huger, Cleland Kinloch, Charleston, S. C.,* d Huger, Cordes, 

Perdriau, Rassin or Rufin, Richet. 
Mar. 8, 1890. .Huger, Francis K., Brunswick, Ga Huger, Cordes, Perdriau, 

Rassin or Rufin, Richet. 
April 13, 1898. .Huger, Miss Mary Esther, New Orleans, La., r Huger, 

dePeuch, Cordes, Perdriau, Rassin 

or Rufin, Richet. 
Sept. 5, 1898. .Huger, Mrs. Sabina II., Charleston, S. C Huger, Cordes, 

Perdriau, Rassin or Rufin, Richet. 
April 13, 1903. .Huger, Alfred, Charleston, S. C Huger, Broun, Cordes, 

Perdriau, Rassin. or Rufin, Richet. 
April 14, 1890. .Huger, Wm. E., Charleston, S. C Huger, Cordes, Perdriau, 

Rassin or Rufin, Richet. 
April 13, 1885. .Huger, Dr. Wm. II., Charleston, S. C.,* d Huger, Broun, 

Cordes, Perdriau, Rassin, or Rufin, 

Richet. 

April 13, 1914. .Huguenin, David, Charleston, S. C Huguenin. 

April 15, 1909. .Huguenin, Mrs. M. L. C, Lakeland, Fla Cordes. 

Feb. 2, 1888. .Huguenin, Thomas A., Charleston, S. C.,d Huguenin. 

April 20, 1906. .Humbird, David, Hudson, Wis., l.m Humbert. 

April 20, 1906. .Humbird, James L., Pittsburgh, Pa.,/, m Humbert. 

April 16, 1916. .Hunt, Gaillard, Washington, D. C Gaillard. 

April 13, 1910, .Ilurin, James II., Los Angeles, Cal., c Trabue. 

April 14, 1916. .Hodges, Mrs. James B., Spartanburg, S. C Bonncau. 

April 13, 1903. .Hoyt, Miss L. R., Camden, S. C, r Gaillard. 

April 13, 1903. .Hoyt, Mrs. R. C, Columbia, S. C Gaillard. 



74 TRANSACTIONS 

April 13, 1910. .Jackson, Mrs. Elizabeth Walker, Bennettsville, S. C Duvall. 

April 13, 1915. Jay, John B., Philadelphia, Pa Jay. 

April 22, 1908. Jenkins, C. Bissell, Charleston, S. C Gaulicr. 

Sept. 5, 1898. Jennings, Mrs. William, Atlanta, Ga., r linger, Broun, 

Cordcs, Pcrdriau, Rassin or Rufin, 

Richet. 
April 13, 1893. Jervey, Miss E. 13., Charleston, S. C Mazyck, LeSerurier, 

LcNoble, Ravenel, de St. J alien, 

PosteU. 

Oct. 30, 1885. Jervey, Eugene P., Charleston, S..C, r PosteU. 

Oct. 30, 1885. .Jervey, James I., d Mazyck, Ravenel, de St. Julien, PosteU. 

April 13, 1885. Jervey, Rene R.,* d .Mazyck, Ravenel, de St. Julien, PosteU. 

April 13, 1885. Jervey, Wm. St. Julien, Charleston, S. C.,*d Mazyck, 

LeSerurier, Ravenel, de St. Julien, 

LeNoble, PosteU. 

Jan. 17, 1890. Johnson, Rev. John, D.D., Charleston, S. C, d Bonneau. 

Oct. 30, 1885. Johnson, William, d: Bonneau. 

April 19, 1911 . Johnson, Mrs. Fannie Cave, Mexico, Mo I J eronette. 

April 15, 1912. Johnson, Mrs. John D., Indianapolis, Ind DuPuy. 

April 13, 1902. Johnstone, Mrs. Fanny L., Mobile, Ala., c Lesesne. 

April 13, 1904. Johnstone, Miss Isabel F., Georgetown, S. C de Marbeuf, 

deSaussure. 

April 13, 1905. Johnstone, Miss Emma E., Baltimore, Md de Marbeuf. 

April 16, 1913. Jones, Mrs. Allen, Columbia, S. C Porcher, DuBose, Marion, 

Gendron, Mazyck, Cherigny, Ferri. 

Oct. 30, 1885 . Jones, Ella II., Pickens, Miss Segur. 

Oct. 30, 1885. Jones, Miss Lottie M., Pickens, Miss Segur. 

April 13, 1902. Jordan, Miss Mary D., Chattanooga, Term., r. . . .Matte, Huger. 

April 14, 1916. .Keim, Miss Julia M., Philadelphia, Pa Trezcvant. 

April 13, 1915. .Keith, Mrs. Willis Wilkinson, Charleston, S. C Robert. 

April 15, 1907. .Kelly, Mrs. Robert F., c Legare. 

April 15, 1909. Keels, Miss Annie Olivia, Rembert, S. C DcRichebourg. 

May 21, 1916. .Kenan, Robert (i., Savannah, Ga Gignilliat. 

April 22, 1908. .Kendrick, Mrs. Julia Lawton, Philadelphia, Pa., d Robert. 

April 2, 1885. .Kershaw, Rev. John, Charleston, S. C,*r DuBose. 

April 2, 1885. .Kershaw, Mrs. John, Charleston, S. C.,* r deSaussure, 

Gourdin. 
April 15, 1909. .Kidd, Mrs. Lelia Major, Sedalia, Mo DuPuy, Trabuc, 

LeVillain, Flournoy. 
June 8, 1899. .King, Edward PosteU, Atlanta, Ga., c. . .Gignilliat, LeSerurier, 

Porcher, PosteU, DuPre, Pelot. 

April 14, 1916. .King, Mrs. Ernest W., Charleston, S. C Legare. 

April 13, 1903. .King, Mitchell, d. Gignilliat, LeSerurier, Porcher, 

PosteU, DuPre, Pelot. 

April 13, 1904. .Kirk, Robert J., Kingstree, S. C, c Couturier, Dalbiac. 

April 14, 1916. .Kirk, F. deL., Charleston, S. C de Liesseline. 

April 14, 1916. . Kirk, Mrs. L. deL., Charleston, S. C de Liesseline. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



75 



April 14 



April 14, 


1916 


April 13, 


1914 


April 19, 


1911 


April 14, 


1916 


April 13, 


1904 


April 14, 


1916 


April 19, 


1911 


April 13, 


1915 


April 13, 


1915 


April 14, 


1916 


April 5, 


1890 


Sept. 23, 


1898 


April 7, 


1890 


April 13, 


1914 


Feb. 15, 


1897 


April 13, 


1902 


April 13, 


1885 


Oct. 30, 


1885 


April 14, 


1890 


Mar. 15, 


1898 


April 15, 


1912 


Oct. 30, 


1885 


April 15, 


1912 


April 11, 


1898 



April 15 



April 14, 


1916 


April 15, 


1909 


April 13, 


1914 


AprU 13, 


1914 


April 13, 


1914 


April 13, 


1910 


April 15, 


1909 


AprU 13, 


1914 



1916 



1907 



.Kirk, W. M. F., Charleston, S. C de Liessdine. 

. Kaminski, Mrs. E. S., Georgetown, S. C . . de Murbucuf. 

. Kirkwood, Miss Lucia Vera, Bennettsville, S. C Legare, 

Miluor. 

.Knight, Mrs. Caroline O., Nicholas ville, Ky DuPuy, Trabue. 

. Knight, Gerald B., Waycross, Ga L'Engle. 

Knox, Miss Mattie E., Charleston, S. C, r Mazyck, 

LeSerurier, Ravenel, LeNoble, De St. 

J alien. 

.Kinzie, John H., Charleston, S. C Quiiiturd. 

.Kopperl, Mrs. Waldine Zipleman, Galveston, Texas. . . .DuPuy. 

.LaBr'uce, Alfred T., Charleston, S. C de la Brosse. 

.LaBruce, Miss Emily IT., Charleston, S. C de la Brosse. 

.LaCoste, Miss G. C, Warrenton, N. C Bacot, Foissin, 

Peronneau. 

.Langley, P. G., Charleston, S. C, d Prioleau. 

.Langley, P. G., Jr., Charleston, S. C, r Prioleau. 

.Langley, Samuel, d Prioleau. 

Lanneau, Mrs. Phoebe Baker, Charleston, S. C Robert. 

.Latta, Mrs. Hattie N., Charlotte, N. C, r Legardere. 

.Laurens, Mrs. H. R., Charleston, S. C Simons, Mazyck, 

LeNoble, St. Julien, de Chastaigner, 

DtiPre] LeSerurier, Buret el, DeLisle. 

.Laurens, Henry R., Charleston, S. C.,* Laurens. 

.Lawrence, Mrs. Hannah A., J de St. Julien. 

.Lawton, General Alexander R., Savannah, Ga., d Robert. 

.Lawton, Alexander R., Savannah, Ga Robert. 

.Lawton, Alexander Robert, Jr., Savannah, Ga Robert. 

.Lawton, Mrs. W. Wallace, Charleston, S. C Robert, Broye, 

leGrand, dcMangueville, Jaudon. 

.Lawton, Miss Florence I., Estill, S. C Robert. 

.Lawton, St. John Allison, Charleston, S. C Robert, Broye, 

leGrand, dcMangueville, Jaudon. 
Lafaye, Mrs. Charlotte Cordes Lucas, Columbia, S. C. . .Cordes, 

Mazyck, LeSerurier, Legcr, de St. 

Julien. 

.Lebby, Mrs. S. Lee, Charleston, S. C Robert. 

.LeCompte, Miss Margaret J., Lexington, Ky LeCompte. 

.Lee, Mrs. Lyons, Ashville, N. C Duvall. 

.Lee, Mrs. Marguerite duPont, Washington, D. C DuPont. 

.L'Engle, Porcher, Jacksonville, Fla Porcher. 

.Legare, Mrs. E. C, Charleston, S. C, d Marion. 

.Legare, E. T., Charleston, S. C Marion, Gendron, Cordes, 

Porcher, deMarbeouf, Cahusac, Ma- 
zyck, Couturier. 
.Leiding, Mrs. Harriette Kershaw, Charleston, S. C 

deSaussure, Gourdin, DuBose. 



76 TRANSACTIONS 

April 13, 1885 . Legare, Dr. Thomas,* d Legare. 

April 13, 1904. .LeGrand, James Hutchinson, Tyler, Texas LeGrond. 

Feb. 21, 1900. Lewis, Mrs. James Hamilton, Washington, D. C Robert, 

Broye, IcGrutid, deMangueville, Jau- 

don. 

April 14, 1916. Lewis, II. Latone, Washington, I). C Latone. 

April 22, 1908. Lewis, A. P., Chicago, 111 Porcher, deCherigny 

April 15, 1907. Lewis, Miss Anne Porcher, Clemson College, S. C Porcker, 

deCherigny. 

April 13, 1902. Lining, Mrs. Ida M., Charleston, S. C, d L'Escott. 

Jan. 24, 1900. .Lockwood, Mrs. J. Palmer, Charleston, S. C Carre, 

t Vcrgercau, Buitdinul, P OS tell, Papin, 

Mahault. 

April 15, 1907. .Long, Mrs. John T., St. Louis, Mo Gaillard, DuPre. 

April 14, 1916. Long, Mrs. W. W., Clemson College, S. C Petit. 

April 13, 1910. .Long, William Ballard, Indianapolis, Ind., r. . . .Trabue, Giurav.t, 

Martin, Dabney, Maupin. 
April 13, 1910 .Long, Mrs. Elizabeth Ballard, Indianapolis, Ind., r Dabney, 

Maupin. 
April 13, 1910 .Long, William Dudley, Indianapolis, Ind., r Trabue 

G iterant, Mar I in. 

April 15, 1903. Loomis, Mrs. Henry P., New York, N. V Boudinot, Carre. 

April 14, 1916 .Lucas, Mrs. Orange S., Santee, S. C Gendron, Cordes. 

April 20, 1906. .Lucas, Mrs. Mary R., Santee, S. C Cordes. 

April 13, 1914. .Lucas, Mahland B., Waycross, Ga DuPre. 

April 17, 1890. .Lucas, J. J., Society Hill, S. C, d Simons, DuPre. 

April 13, 1915. .Lucas, Mrs. James Hunt, St. Louis, Mo Flournois. 

April 13, 1902 . . Lucas, 44ios. S., Savannah, Ga DuPre, Simons. 

April 13, 1902 . Lucas, W. E., Laurens, S. C, d DuPre, Simons. 

April 14, 1916. .Lyons, Mrs. P. M., Memphis, Tenn dela Hunte. 

June 22, 1897. Macbeth, Malcolm, St. Louis, Mo., d Ravenel, Gaillard, 

Cordes. 
April 20, 1906 Macbeth, Ravenel, Mackay, Idaho Ravenel, Gaillard, 

CarJes, deChastaigner. 
April 13, 1893. .Manigault, Arthur M., Charleston, S. C, r . .Manigault, linger. 

Oct. 13, 1885 Manigault, Edward, r Manigalt, Mazyck. 

Oct. 29, 1885. .Manigault, Eliza S., r Manigault. 

Dec. 29, 1889. .Manigault, Dr. Gabriel E.,d Manigault. 

July 27, 1889. .Manigault, Henry M., Charleston, S. C, d Manigault. 

July 4, 1897. .Manigault, Joseph, Savannah, Ga., d Manigault. 

Oct. 30, 1885. .Manigault, Louis, d Manigault. 

Oct. 30, 1885. .Manigault, Miss Mary M., r Manigault, Mazyck. 

April 14, 1916. .Martin, Benjamin, Jr., Muskogee, Okla Robert. 

April 13, 1914. Martin, Frank Bostick, Washington, D. C Robert. 

Nov. 2, 1895. .Marion, E. B., St. Stephens, S. C Marion. 

April 13, 1914. .Mathewes, Edward Miles, Spartanburg, S. C Peronncau. 

April 21, 1900. .Mathewes, Mrs. E. P., Spartanburg, S. C Peronneau. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



77 



April 


13, 


April 


14, 


April 


14, 


April 


14, 


April 


15, 


June 


1, 


June 


1, 



April 13, 

April 13, 

April 13 , 

April 13, 

April 13, 



April 13, 

Oct. 30, 
April 13, 

April 13, 

April 2, 

April 13, 

April 13, 

April 23, 
April 13, 
April 2, 

April 15, 



1905. .Mason, Mrs. Louisa B., d Serre. 

1916 .Mastin, Mrs. George R., Lexington, Ky Farrott, Unlet, 

1916. .Mastin, Miss Lamar, Lexington, Ky Far rati, Unlet. 

1916. Matthews, Mrs. J. W., Spartanburg, S. C Jionncau. 

1909. Maury, Miss Ann llerndon, Richmond, Va., l.m Maury, 

dc la Fontaine. 

1899. .Maury, M. F., Richmond, Va., d Maury, de la Fontaine. 

1899. .Maury, Col. Richard L., Richmond, Va., d Maury, 

de la Fontaine. 

1914. .Maury, Miss Virginia L., Washington, 1). C Maury, 

' de la Fontaine. 
1904. .Maupin, Miss Sallie W., Baltimore, Md., c Maupin. 

1904. .Maupin, Miss Margaret L., Baltimore, Md Maupin. 

1910. .Mayrant, Miss Caroline Kinloch, Summerville, S. C. . May rant, 

Gu ign ard, DeLesselin . 
1910. .Mayrant, Mrs. W. R., Charleston, S. C Simons, DuPre, 

Le Serurier, Leger, Mazyck, Dubose, 

Du Gue. 
1910. Mayrant, W. R., Charleston, S. C Mayrant, Gui guard, 

DeLesselin, Gaillard, Paparel, Leger, 

LeSerurier. 
1885. .Mazyck, Alexander PL, Charleston, S. C, r Mazyck, 

deChastaigner, Gaillard, Le Serurier. 
1899. .Mazyck, Miss Arabella, Charleston, S. C, d. . .Mazyck, Porcher, 

de St. Julieu, deChastaigner, Le 

Serurier. 

1905. Mazyck, Miss Arabella S., Charleston, S. C Mazyck, Porcher, 

de St. Julien, LeSerurier, deChas- 
taigner. 

1885. .Mazyck, Arthur, Charleston, S. C.,* d Mazyck, Porcher, 

de St. Julien, de Chastaigner, Le 
Serrurier. 

LS ( >4 Mazyck, Miss Katherine B., Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

Porcher, de St. Julien, de Chastaig- 
ner, Le Serurier. 

1885. .Mazyck, Edmund,* d Mazyck, Porcher, de St. Julien, 

de Chaistaigner, LeSerurier. 

1892. .Mazyck, Mrs. Epps Parker, (Arthur) Charleston, S. C 

Mazyck, Ravenel, Le Serurier. 

1902. .Mazyck, Miss Ethel, Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

dc Chastaigner, Gaillard, Le Serurier. 

1885. .Mazyck, Isaac, Charleston, S. C* d. Mazyck, Porcher, 

de St. Julien, Le Serurier, dc Chas- 
taigner. 

1899. .Mazyck, Miss Marion, Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

dc Chastaigner, Gaillard, Le Serurier. 



78 TRANSACTIONS 

April 13, 1910. Mazyck, Dr. McM. K., Charleston, S. C Mazyck' 

de St. J idiot, Le Serurier, de Chas- 
taigner. 
April 7, 1890. .Mazyck, Philip P., Charleston, S. C, d Mazyck, Porchtr, 

de St. J alien, Le Serurier, de Chas- 

taigner. 

April 13, 1902. .Mazyck, Mrs. Pierre, d Bounetheau, Legare. 

April 13, 1885. .Mazyck, Stephen,* d Mazyck, Ravenel, Le Noble, 

Le Serurier, de St. Julitn. 
April 13, 1902. v Mazyck, Miss Vallee, Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

LeScruricr, Chastaigner, Gaillard. 
April 13, 1885. .Mazyck, Wm. Gaillard, Charleston, S. C.,* Mazyck, 

de Cliastaigner, Gaillard, Lc Serurier. 
April 20, 1906. .Mazyck, Wm. G., Jr., Charleston, S. C Mazyck, Gaillard, 

de Chaslaigner, Le Serurier. 
Jan. 11, 1890. .Mazyck, Wm. St. Julien, d Mazyck, Porcher, de St. Julien, 

Le Serurier, de Chastaigner. 
April 2, 1901 . .McComb, Mrs. Anna L., New Castle, Pa., d Le Serurier, 

Mazyck, Godin, Guerard. 

April 9, 1890. .McCrady, Edward, Charleston, S. C, d DeBemiere. 

April 2, 1885. .McCrady, Louis deB., Charleston, S. C* d DeBemiere. 

April 14, 1916. .McCue, Mrs. M. L. C, Charleston, S. C Legare. 

April 15, 1903. .McGowan, Mrs. C. P., Charleston, S. C, r Peronneau. 

April 19, 1911. .McElroy, Mrs. Alary Hardy, Kansas City, Mo., d DuPuy. 

May 22, 1916. .Mclntyre, Mrs. Frances Wilson, Pasadena, Cal Quintard. 

April 15, 1905. .Mclver, Mrs. G. W., Charleston, S. C Bounetheau. 

April 14, 1916. .McKeithan, Mrs. S. A., Darlington, S. C Bacot, Foissin, 

Perofvuau. 
April 22, 1908. .McMillan, Mrs. Hess Porcher, Atlanta, Ga., c Porcher, 

deCherigny. 
April 15, 1909. .Memminger, C. Gustavus, Lakeland, Fla Mazyck, Porcher, 

dc St. Julien, LeSerurier, de Chas- 
taigner. 
Jan. 13, 1890. .Memminger, R. W. Jr., Charleston, S. C, r Mazyck, 

Porcher, de St. Julien, Le Serurier, 

de Chastaigner. 
Feb. 20, 1895. .Memminger, Mrs. Susan M., Charleston, S. C, d . . Mazyck, 

Porcher, de St. Julien, LeSururier, 

deChastaigncr. 

April 13, 1915. .Meriwether, Miss Hennie, Luling, Texas Pickens. 

April 15, 1907 . .Meserole, J. V., Brooklyn, N. Y.,d Meserole. 

April 14, 1916. .Meserole, C. V., Englewood, N. J Meserole. 

April 13, 1885. .Meynardie, Rev. E. ].,* d Meynardie. 

July 2, 1903. .Middleton, Mrs. Henry Izard, Charleston, S. C Porcher, 

Turquand. 

April 13, 1915. .Michel, Henry Lafayette, Atlanta, Ga Michel. 

April 15, 1909. .Michaux, Miss Marie Ella, Bennettsville, S. C Bieme. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 79 

April 15, 1903. .Miles, Miss Margaret M., Flat Rock, N. C, d Bierne. 

April 15, 1909. .Miles, Mrs. J. Allen, Charleston, S. C. . .Mazyck, LeSerurier. 

Gendron, Poyas. 

Nov. 2, 1895. .Miles, Mrs. Mary Peronneau, d Peronneait. 

April 22, 1908. .Miles, Mrs. R. M., New York, N. Y Gibert. 

April 13, 1902. .Miles, Miss Sarah A., Charleston, S. C Mazyck, Parcher, 

St. J alien, Le Serurier, deChastaigner. 

April 13, 1910. .Miller, Mrs. Anna M., Atlanta, Ga. c Branaugh. 

April 13, 1910 .Miller, Mrs. Phillip, Bennettsville, S. C dc Richbourg. 

April 13, 1914. .Miller, Mrs. Florence Griflith, Asheville, N. C, l.m Duvall. 

April 13, 1904. .Miller, Miss Mary C, Charleston, S. C. . . .Cothoneau, Legate. 

April 14, 1890 .Miller, W. C, Charleston, S. C Cothoneau, Legare. 

April 13, 1885. .Milnor, Mrs. E. M., Charleston, S. C.,* d. . . Legare, Cothoneau. 

April 14, 1916. .Mikell, Franklin T., New York, N. Y Trezevant. 

April 13, 1902. .Mitchell, Mrs. Pearl Maury, Bessemer, Ala. . . .Maury, Fontaine. 

April 15, 1903. .Mitchell, Edgar L., Bessemer, Ala Maury. 

April 14, 1916. .Mixson, Mrs. Robert M., Williston, S. C Laurent, Flournoy. 

April 19, 1911 . .Moody, Mrs. W. L., Jr., Galveston, Texas Arge. 

April 17, 1913. .Moore, H. B., New York, N. Y Toussuer. 

April 13, 1885. .Morris, C. Ellis,* r Mazyck, Ravenel, Le Noble. 

April 14, 1916. .Moreland, Miss Caroline, Charleston, S. C Gendron, Poyas, 

Trezevant. 
April 14, 1916. .Moreland, Rt. Rev. Wm. Hall, Sacramento, Cal Gendron, 

Trezevant, Poyas. 

April 15, 1907. .Morse, Mrs. E. Rollins, Washington, D. C Serre. 

April 13, 1914. .Morgan, Douglas O., Washington, D. C Robert. 

April 15, 1907. .Morgan, Mrs. Georgia Lawton, Washington, D. C BroyS, 

LeGrand, Jaudon, Robert, deMan- 

grcville. . 

April 13, 1914. Moss, Mrs. F. Agnes Dibble, Orangeburg, S. C Gabeau. 

Sept. 22, 1897. .Motte, Rev. John W., Eutawville, S. C. Motte. 

Nov. 16, 1897 . .Motte, John W. jr., Savannah, Ga Motte. 

April 13, 1905. .Mouzou, Lawrence, c Moiizon. 

April 13, 1904. .Munro, Mrs. Elizabeth B., Charleston, S. C. r Manigault. 

Feb. 16, 1900. .Myers, Frank K., Charleston, S. C deRosset. 

April 13, 1910. .Myers, Thomas E., Charleston, S. C deRosset. 

April 13, 1914. .Myers, Mrs. Thomas E. (Louisa Rebecca), Charleston, S. C. . . . 

Bacot, deBerniere, Huger, deSaus- 

sure, Peronneau. 

April 14, 1916. .Nelson, Mrs. Richard Adams, Williamson, W. Va Bacot. 

April 2, 1885. .Neufville, Miss Anna C, Charleston, S. C* Neufville. 

April 2, 1885 . .Neufville, B. K., Charleston, S. C.,* d Neufville. 

April 2, 1885. .Neufville, H. S.,* d Neufville. 

April 2, 1885. Neufville, Miss Julia Y., Charleston, S. C.,* d Neujville. 

April 13, 1902. .Noble, Miss Mary, Galveston, Texas. . . .Bonneau, Roi, DuBliss, 

de Longutmare. 
April 22, 1908. .Norton, Mrs. Euphemia B., c. . . .Hannah, wife of Francis Cooke. 



80 



TRANSACTIONS 



April 22 
April 14 
April 13 

April 19 



April 13, 


1891 


April 13, 


1913 


April 13, 


1913 


Mar. 21, 


1900 


April 13, 


1885 


April 13, 


1885 


April 5, 


1890 


April 14, 


1916 


April 13, 


1905 


April 13, 


1891 


April 13, 


1901 


April, 2, 


1885 


April 13, 


1902 


April 19, 


1911 


April 2, 


1885 


April 21, 


1900 


April 19, 


1911 


April 27, 


1899 


April 14, 


1916 


April 14, 


1916 


April 16, 


1913 


Sept. 26, 


1899 


April 15, 


1003 


April 13, 


1915 


April 14, 


1890 


April 14, 


1916 


April 19, 


1896 


April 13, 


1885 


April 3, 


1890 


April 23, 


1897 


April 13, 


1915 


April 13, 


1907 



1908 
1916 
1904 



1911 



.Norton, Mrs. Edith Emery, c Hannah, wife of Francis Co<>ke. 

.Norwood, S. W., Marion, S. C DuBose. 

.O'Brien, Mrs. Eliza N. VY\, c Mazyck, LeSerurier, 

de Si. Julien, Ravenel, LeNoble. 

.O'Connor, Mrs. Charlotte C. Hall, Brooklyn, N. V., c 

LeSerurier, Leger, Trezevant, Mau- 
lard, Poyas, Gendron, Mazyck. 
O'Hear, James, Charleston, S. C, r . . Legart. 

.O'Hear, Miss M. Legare, Charleston, S. C, r Legart. 

O'Hear, Mrs. James, Charleston, S. C Poslcll, Papin. 

.Oswald, George Douglas, James Island, S. C, c . . . .Robert, Broyt, 
LcGrand, Jaudon, deMangreville. 

.Palmer, Mrs. Agnes M.,* d Gaillard. 

.Palmer, Mrs. Alice A., Charleston, S. C.,* d Gaillard, 

Porcher, de Cherigny, Mazyck, Le 
Serurier. 

.Palmer, Dr. Joseph, Trail, S. C, d Gendron. 

.Palmer, Philip G., Summerville, S. C Gendron. 

.Palmer, Mrs. Lucy B., Cambridge, Mass Mauze. 

.Parker, Edward L., d. . . . N Peronneau. 

.Parker, Dr. F. Lejau, Charleston, S. C, d LeJau. 

.Parry, Mrs. Agnes S., Charleston, S. C.,* d Legare. 

.Parry, Alva B., Charleston, S. C, d • Legare. 

.Parry, Miss Inez B., Charleston, S. C Legare. 

.Parry, L. Toomer,* r Legare. 

.Parry, Miss Susan H., Charleston, S. C Legare. 

.Paul, Washburn, Anniston, Ala Prioleau. 

.Peronneau, Miss Susan H., Monteagle, Tenn., d. . .Peronneau. 

. Pcelle, Mrs. Stanton C, Chevy Chase, Md Ravenel. 

.Pettigrew, Miss Alice L., Catonsville, Md Gibert. 

Pine, Mrs. C. J. P., Cincinnati, Ohio Papineau, Bounos. 

. Pinckney, Robt. ().,</ Gaillard. 

Pollard, Mrs. R., r 

. Porcher, Miss Anne Allston, Charleston, S. C Porcher. 

.Porcher, Miss Anna S., Charleston, S. C Porcher, Mazyck, 

Gendron. 
Porcher, Lieut. C. G., Mobile, Ala Porcher. 

.Porcher, Miss Celia S., Charleston, S. C Porcher, Mazyck, 

Gendron. 

.Porcher, Prof. E. A.,* d Porcher, Mazyck, Gendron. 

Porcher, Dr. Erancis Peyre, d .Porcher, Peyre. 

.PORCHER, ISAAC de C, Bonneau, S. C, c Porcher, 

de Cherigny, Ravenel, Mazyck, Le 
Noble, dc Si. Julien, Le Serurier. 

.Porcher, J. Faber, Charleston, S. C Porcher. 

PORCHER, JOHN II., Pinopolis, S. C, d Porcher, 

de Cherigny, Ravenel, Mazyck, Le- 
Noble, de Si. Julien, LeSerurier. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 81 

April 13, 1914. Porchcr, F. Peyre, El Paso, Texas Porcher. 

April 19, 1911. Porcher, Mrs. Katherinc Cordes, Charleston, S. C Marian, 

DeVeaux. 
April 20, 1906. Porcher, Mrs. Philip Gendron, Mt. Pleasant, S. C Gendron, 

Cordes. 

May 5, 1897. Porcher, Philip E., Mt. Pleasant, S. C Porcher. 

April 16, 1913. PORCHER, PERCIVAL R., Pinopolis, S. C Porcher, 

de Cherigny, Ravenel, Mazyck, Le 

Noble, de St. Jtdien, Le Serurier. 
April 20, 1906 Porcher, Philip G., d Porchcr, de Cherigny, DuBose, Cordes, 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
April 19, 1911 . Porcher, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa Porcher, DuBose, 

Cordes, Mazyck, Le Serurier. 
April 13, 1901. .Porcher, Miss Virginia Leigh, Charleston, S. C. . . .de Cherigny, 

Porcher, Peyrc, Mazyck, LeNoble, 

Le Serurier. 
April 13, 1915. .Porcher, Dr. Walter Peyre, Charleston, S. C. . .Porcher, Mazyck, 

LeNoble, de Cherigny, Le Serurier, 

Peyre. 

April 21, 1900. .Porcher, Mrs: Walter Peyre, d Porcher, Gaillard. 

April 2, 1885 PORCHER, WM. MAZYCK,* d Porcher, Mazyck, 

Le Serurier. 
April 13, 1885. .Porcher, Wilmot D., Charleston, S. C*. . . .DuPre, de Cherigny, 

Gignilliat, Pelot, Porcher. 

April 16, 1913. .Porter, Mrs. Katlierine M., Jackson, Miss La Force. 

April 15, 1912. .Potter, Mrs. Aida Blackburn, Galveston, Texas llournoy. 

April 13, 1904. . Poyas, James Q., d ; Poyas. 

April 16, 1916. .Player, James Y., St. Louis, Mo Trezcva)il. 

April 16, 1916. .Player, James Y., Jr., San Antonio, Tex Trczcvaut. 

April 16, 1916. Player, George P., Jefferson City, Mo Trczcvaut. 

April 16, 1916. Player, Thompson T., Houston, Tex Trczcvaut. 

April 22, 1908 .Phillips, James Henry Witherspoon, Tampa, ll.i., c Richfbonrg. 

April 14, 1916 Price, Mrs. Win. Utter, Harrogate, Term DuPuy. 

April 17, 1902. .Pringle, Mrs. Elizabeth W., Plantersville, S. C Gibert. 

June 2, 1897. .Pringle, Mrs. Mary Ford, Charleston, S. C Mazyck, Godin. 

April 2, 1885. Prioleau, Miss Ann G., Charleston, S. C.,* r Gendron. 

April 9, 1890. Prioleau, Charles E., d Prioleau, Gendron, 

April 2, 1885. Prioleau, Mrs. Charlotte S., Charleston, S. C.,* r . . . Gucrard. 

April 13, 1885. .Prioleau, Dr. Jacob Ford,* d Prioleau, Gendron. 

April 13, 1905. Prioleau, John Gaillard, Columbia, S. C Prioleau, Gendron. 

Nov. 2, 1897. Prioleau, Julian, Atlanta, Ga., c Prioleau, Gendron. 

Nov. 25, 1897. .Prioleau, Morris, Atlanta, Ga., c Prioleau, Gendron. 

May 30, 1890. .Prioleau, Philip, Atlanta, Ga., c Prioleau, Gendron. 

Nov. 27, 1897. .Prioleau, Samuel, McCormick, S. C Prioleau, Gendron. 

April 2, 1885. Prioleau, Dr. W. H., Charleston, S. C* Prioleau, Gendron. 

April 13, 1914. .Prioleau, Thomas G., New York, N. Y Prioleau, Gendron. 



82 TRANSACTIONS 

April 13, 1914. .Pritchard, Mrs. William R., Charleston, S. C Papin, Posicll, 

Challion, Serre, Gaillard, Le Clair, 
Jolain, Buisseau, Peyre. 

April 19, 1911 . .Proctor, Mrs. Frank D., Monroe City, Mo Martin. 

Rapine, Guerrant, Trabue. 

April 14, 1916. .Quin, Mrs. Percy E., Natches, Miss Gaillard. 

April 22, 1908. Quinlin, Mrs. Leonard G., New York, N. Y Mauze. 

April 13, 1915. . Quisenberry, Anderson C, Hyattsville, Md. . .Eslenne, Chenaull. 

April 15, 1909. .Rand, Mrs. Belle Palmer, Cambridge, Mass Mauze. 

April 21, 1890. .Randolph, Harrison, Charleston, S. C Bayard, Stuyvcsant. 

April 21, 1900. .Randolph, Mrs. V. B., Charleston, S. C . . .Bayard, Stuyvcsant. 

April 14, 1916. .Ravenel, Miss Annie S., Tryon, N. C Raxenel. 

Mar. 30, 1890. .Ravenel, Alfred Ford, d Ravenel, Priohau. 

Mazyck, Lt Serurier. 

April 15, 1907. .Ravenel, Alfred Ford, d Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, Le Serurier. 

Oct. 30, 1885. .Ravenel, Miss C. P., Charleston, S. C Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, Cordes, Le Serurier, de St. 
Julien. 

April 15, 1903. .Ravenel, Miss Clare W., Philadelphia, Pa. . ..Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Gendron, Mazyck, Le Serurier. 

April 2, 1885. .Ravenel, Daniel,* d Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, Le Serurier. 

April 2, 1835. .Ravenel, Daniel, Jr.,* Charleston, S. C Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, Le Serurier. 

April 13, 1898. .Ravenel, Dr. Edmond, r, Charleston, S. C. . .Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, Le Serurier. 

April 13, 1899. .Ravenel, Elias Prioleau, Charleston, S. C Ravenel, Priohau, 

Mazyck, Le Serurier. 

April 13, 1885. .Ravenel, Miss Elinor P., Charleston, S. C.,* d Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, Cordes, Le Seru- 
rier, de St. Ju icn. 

Oct, 30, 1885. .Ravenel, M iss Elizabeth Mcl\, Charleston, S. C . .Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, Cordes, Le Se- 
rurier, de St. Julien. 

April 2, 1885. .Ravenel, Miss Elizabeth Prioleau, Charleston, S. C.,* . .Ravenel, 

Prio eau, Mazyck, Le Serurier. 

April 13, 1898. .Ravenel, Miss Emma, Charleston, S. C, r Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, Le Serurier. 

April 13, 1885. .Ravenel, Frank G., Charleston, S. C.,* r Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Horry, Mazyck, Le Serurier. 

April 13, 1885. .Ravenel, Mrs. Harriet Parker, Charleston, S. C* Mazyck, 

Ravenel, Le Serurier. 

April 13, 1885. .Ravenel, Mrs. Harriott Horry,* r Horry, Molte. 

April 13, 1885. .Ravenel, Harriott Rutledge, Charleston, S. C.*r Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Horry, Mazyck, Le Se- 
rurier. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



83 



April 
April 


13, 
13, 


Oct. 

April 

April 


30, 

3, 

17, 


Oct. 


30, 


April 


13, 


April 


13, 


April 


15, 


April 


2, 


Mar. 


31, 


April 


23, 


April 


13, 


Oct. 


20, 


Oct. 


30, 


April 


13, 


May 


30, 


April 


3, 


April 


8, 


April 


2, 


April 


1, 


April 


13, 


April 


13, 


April 
April 


16, 
13, 



1914. .Ravenel, Rene, Charleston, S. C Ravenel. 

1899. .Ravenel, Henry E., Spartanburg, S. C Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, LeSernrier. 
1885. .Ravenel, Henry W., d. .Ravenel, Mazyck, LeNoble, de St. Julien. 

1890. .Ravenel, II. S., r Ravenel, Mazyck, LeNoble, de St. Julien. 

1890. .Ravenel, Heyward, Savannah, (la., d Ravenel, Mazyck, 

Porcher, LeNoble, de St. Julien. 
1885. .Ravenel, J. R. P., Charleston, S. C Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
1885. .Ravenel, John,* r Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, 

LeSerurier. 
1885. Ravenel, Louis, Chicago, 111.,* r Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, 

LeSerurier. 
1903. .Ravenel, Miss Marguerite A., Philadelphia, Pa Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Gendron, Mazyck, LeSeru- 
rier. 
1885. .Ravenel, Miss Mary Coffin,* d. .. .Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, 

LeSerurier. 
1890. .Ravenel, Dr. Mazyck Porcher, Columbia, Mb Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Porcher, Mazyck, LeSeru- 
rier. 
1892. .Ravenel, Rene, d Ravenel, Mazyck, LeNoble, DeVeaux, 

de St. Julien. 
1885. .Ravenel, Robert Thurston, Charleston, S. C.,* Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
1885. .Ravenel, Miss Rosa Pringle, Charleston, S. C, r. . . . . . .Ravene , 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
1885. .Ravenel, S. Prioleau ; Philadelphia, Pa., d. . . .Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
1885. .Ravenel, S. Prioleau, Jr., Ashville, N. C* Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
1890. .Ravenel, Stephen DeVeaux, Valdosta, Ga Ravenel, Mazyck, 

Le Noble, de Veaux, de St. Julien. 
1890. .RAVENEL, THOMAS PORCHER, d. .... . .Ravenel, Mazyck, 

Porcher, Le Noble, de St. Julien. 
1890. .Ravenel, Thos. Porcher, Jr., Savannah, Ga. . . Ravenel, Mazyck, 

Porcher, LeNoble, de St. Julien. 
1885. .Ravenel, Win.,* d Ravenel, Prioleau, Mazyck, 

LeSerurier. 
1890. .Ravenel, Wm. Bee., Charleston, S. C Ravenel, Prioleau, 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
1885. .Ravenel, Dr. Wm. Chardon, Charleston, S. C.,* d Ravenel, 

Prioleau, Mazyck, LeSerurier. 
1903.. Ravenel, Wm. deC, Washington, D. C Ravenel, Porcher, 

deChastaigner, St. Julien, DuBose. 
1913. .Rayland, Mrs. S. M., Texarkana, Texas Chastain. 

1915. .Read, M. Alston, Charleston, S. C Moiie. 



84 



TRANSACTIONS 



April 12, 


1890 


April 13, 


1902 


April 13, 


1885 


April 13, 


1914 


Jan. 29, 


1892 


April 17, 


1897 


April 14, 


1916 


Apiil 15, 


1903 


April 14, 


1890 


Oct. 9, 


1890 


April 20, 


1906 


April 15, 


1912 


April 13, 


1902 


April 13, 


1910 


April 2, 


1888 


Nov. 25, 


1897 


April 15, 


1912 


April 8, 


1890 


April 14, 


1890 


April 14, 


1890 


April 14, 


1916 


April 14, 


1916 


April 14, 


1916 


April 14, 


1916 


April 13, 


1914 


April 14, 


1916 


April 14, 


1916 


April 14, 


1916 


April 13, 


1914 


April 13, 


1915 


April 15, 


1909 


April 19, 


1911 


April 15, 


1907 


April 14, 


1916 


April 14, 


1916 


April 22, 


1908 


April 13, 


1901 


April 13, 


1914 


April 14, 


1916 


April 15, 


1907 



. Reeves, John B., Charleston, S. C Bounellieau. 

.Reeves, Mrs. John B., Charleston, S. C Simons, DuPre 

.Reid, Miss Mary Burden, Charleston, S. C.,* d Legare. 

.Reid, Mrs. James Thompson, Navy Yard, New Orleans, La.. . . 

Guerard, Pruschard, Posted, Papin, 

Boudinot, Carre, Vergereau, Mahault. 

. Richardson, John M., d Guignard, DeLesleine. 

Richardson, Thos. E., Sumter, S. C, c . .Guignard, DeLesleine. 

.Robert, Dr. J. C, Centreville, Miss Robert 

. Robert, John PL, Garnett, S. C Robert. 

. Robert, Pierre, Robertville, S. C, c Robert. 

.Robert, Rev. Wm. H., Centerfield, Mass., c Robert. 

Roberts, Mrs. Belle S. Y., Birmingham, Ala Poyas, Legare. 

.Roberts, Miss Jane DuBose, New York, N. Y Porcher. 

.Robertson, Henry C, Franklin, N. C Marion, Baluel. 

.Robinson, Miss Ellen Llewellyn, St. Louis, Mo., r . .Jacquelin. 

. Rodgers, S. IL, Beaufort, S. C, c '. '. Legare. 

Rogers, Miss Louisa, New York, N. Y., c Gignillial. 

.Rose, Mrs. Andrew, Texarkana, Texas Gaston. 

.Rose, W. H., Columbia, S. C, r Mazyck, Godin, Guerard. 

.Rutledge, Gen'l Benj. Huger, d linger, Cordes, Perdriau, 

Rassin or Rafin, Ricket. 

. Rutledge, B. H., Jr., r Huger, Cordes. 

.Rheams, Mrs. Edna P. H., Kenner, La Poyas. 

.Sampson, Miss S. M. L., Georgetown, S. C de Marboeuf. 

.Savage, Mrs. W. L., Philadelphia, Pa Trezcvant. 

.Sharkey, Mrs. Robert W.. Florence, S. C Legare. 

.Scott, Mrs. Munford Gregg, Florence, S. C Postcll, Boudinot, 

Carre, Papin, Vergereau, Mahault. 

. Scarpa, Mrs. E. S. F., Charleston, S. C Boudinot. 

. Scull, Mrs. G. IL, New York, N. Y Robert. 

.Scruggs, Mrs. Martha Watkins, Kansas City, Mo DuPuy. 

Seabrook, Strobhart IL, Atlanta, Ga Horry. 

.Seabrook, Mrs. Elizabeth IL, Bennetisville, S. C Horry. 

Sease, Mrs. Mary Olivia Shecut, Orangeburg, S. C Shecut. 

. Selkirk, Mrs. Louise Mann, Galveston, Tex., r Pickens. 

. Semple, Mrs. Isabel J. F., Clayton, Mo Macon. 

.Sevier, Mrs. Robert, Richmond, Mo DuPuy. 

. Sevier, Miss Rosa V., Tallulah, La Sevier. 

. Seyburn, Mrs. Kathleen W., Patterson, La Mazyck, 

LeSeruricr, LcNoble, de St. J alien, 

Raven cl. 

. Shackelford, Mrs. Annie La Far, Charleston, S. C Thomas. 

. Shecut, Dr. L. C, Orangeburg, S. C Shecut. 

.Schmeltzer, Mrs. H. R., San Antonio, Tex de la Hunk. 

.Shields, Mrs. Mazyck W-, c Mazyck, LeSeruricr, Ravcnel, 

LeNoble, de St. Julicn. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 85 

April 13, 1910. .Stropshire, Mrs. Susan Jane Martin, Ncalton, Ky., c Trabue, 

Martin, G iterant, Rapine. 

April 22, 1908. .Simons, Mrs. Annie C, Berkeley Co., S. C, r Gaillard. 

May 30, 1890. Simons, Arthur St. J., Charleston, S. C, d Simons. 

April 13, 1910. .Simons, Miss Katherine Drayton, Summcrville, S. C. . .Mayrant, 

Guiguard, De Lesslin, Gaillard, Rav- 

enel, Legare, Le Serurier, Simons, 

DuPre, Mazyck, DuGue, St. J alien. 
April 13, 190-1. .Simons, Edw. A., Charleston, S. C Simons, DuPre, 

Mazyck, Le Serurier. 
April 13, 1904. .Simons', Eugene N., Charleston, S. C Simons, DuPre, 

Mazyck, Le Serurier. 

April 13, 1905. .Simons, Mrs. Hal, r Bacot, deSaussure, Peronneau. 

April 22, 1908. .Simons, Aiken, Charleston, S. C Simons, DuPre, 

Mazyck, Mayrant. 
April 15, 1907. Simons, Mrs. Josephine Alston, Georgetown, S. C, c. . . .Horry. 

April 13, 1885. .Simons, Dr. Manning, Charleston, S. C.,* r Simon. 

April 13, 1910. .Simons, Miss Mary I'on, Charleston, S. C Simons, DuPre, 

Le Serurier, Legarc, Mazyck, Du- 

Bose, DuGue. 

July 18, 1898. .Simons, P. Noble, Brevard, N. C Mazyck, Simons. 

April 13, 1910. .Simons, Mrs. S. Lewis, Summerville, S. C Mayrant, 

Guiguard, De Leseleine, Gaillard, 

Ravenel, Legare, Le Serurier. 

April 5, 1890. .Simons, Dr. T. Grange, Charleston, S. C Simons. 

April 15, 1907. .Sims, Pierre Robert, Charleston, S. C, c Robert. 

July 12, 1897. .Sinkler, Mrs. Charles St. G., Eutawville, S. C Porcher. 

April 19, 1911 . .Sinkler, Mrs. Ellen Simons Hall, Charleston, S. C, c 

LeSerurier, Leger, Simons, DuPre, 

Poyas, Gendron, Trezevant, Maulard, 

Mazyck. 
April 13, 1902. Sinkler, Huger, Charleston, S. C, r Huger, Broun, Cardes, 

Perdriau, Rassin or Rujin, Richet. 

April 13, 1901. .Sinkler, Thomas S., Charleston, S. C Huger, Broun, 

. Cordes, Perdriau, Rassin or Rujin, 

Richel. 

April 15, 1909 Sloan, Frank Porcher, Atlanta, Ga., c Porcher. 

April 13, 1885. .Smith, D. E. Huger, Charleston, S. C.,* Huger, Cordes, 

Perdriau, Rassin or Rujin, Richet. 

April 15, 1909. .Smith, Hon. H. A. M., Charleston, S. C, H.M 

April 17, 1896. Smith, Robt. T., Charleston, S. C, r Huger, Cordes, 

Perdriau, Rassin or Rujin, Richet. 

April 14, 1916. .Smith, Miss Edith Whitehall, Denver, Col Trabue. 

April 14, 1916. .Smith, John Palmer, Charleston, S. C Gendron, 

Mazyck, Cordes. 

April 23, 1891 . .Smith, S. Porcher, Mount Pleasant, S. C, c Porcher. 

April 15, 1903. .Smith, Mrs. Z. F., Louisville, Ky., d DuPuy, Trabue, 

Flournoy. 



86 TRANSACTIONS 

April 22, 1908. .Smythe, A. T., Jr., Charleston, S. C Turquand, Cuurtonne. 

April 13, 1901. .Smythe, Rev. L. Cheves McCord, Tokyo, Japan Cuurtonne, 

Turquand. 

June 14, 1895. .Smythe, Mrs. Louisa McC, Charleston, S. C Turquand. 

April 16, 1913. .Snowden, Theo. Gaillard, Charleston, S. C Gaillard. 

April 21, 1900. .Snowden, Mrs. Theo. Gaillard, Charleston, S. C Postell, 

Mazyck, Ravenel. 

Sept. 15, 1885. .Snowden, Yates, Columbia, S. C LeQueux. 

Mar. 8, 1898. .Spratly, Mrs. M. G., Mobile, Ala., r Gaillard. 

April 19, 1911 . .Squire, Mrs. Corinne L., New York, N. Y Robert. 

April 13, 1910. .Stanhope, Mrs. Annette Martin, Lexington, Ky Trabue, 

Rapine, Gucrant, Martin. 

April 14, 1916. .Steedman, Charles R., Providence, R. I Jeannerelle, Serre. 

April 13, 1915. .Sternberg, Mrs. Harriet Elizabeth, Reading, Pa Toumeur. 

April 13, 1914. .Stevens, Mrs. D. Hugh, Monroe City, Mo DuPuy, 

Floumoy. 

April 15, 1912. .Stephens, Miss Mamie Houston, Webb, Miss Gibert. 

Mar. 31, 1891 . Stevens, Right Rev. P. F., d Fayssoux. 

April 13, 1902. .Stiles, Rev. Charles A., Eastover, S. C, d Legare. 

April 14, 1890. .Stillman, Miss Anna R., Tuscaloosa, Ala., H.M Author on 

Huguenot Subjects. 
April 14, 1916. .Stoney, Augustine T. S., Charleston, S. C Coutonne, 

Turquand, Gaillard. 
April 14, 1916 Stoney, Miss Harriet Porcher, Charleston, S. C Coutonne, 

Turquand, Gaillard. 

April 13, 1885. .Stoney, Mrs. Harriet Porcher,* d Gaillard, Porcher. 

April 14, 1916. .Stoney, Miss Louisa McCord, Charleston, S. C Coutonne, 

Turquand, Gaillard. 

July 15, 1887 .. Stoney, Samuel D., d. . Gaillard. 

April 13, 1885. .Stoney, Samuel G., Charleston, S. C.,* Gaillard, Porcher. 

April 12, 1902. .Stoney, Mrs. Samuel G., Charleston, S. C Turquand, 

Coutonne. 
April 13, 1910. Stoney, S. G., jr., Charleston, S. C Guilford, Coutonne, 

Turquand. 

Aug. 6, 1894. .Stoney, Thomas P., St. Louis, Mo Gaillard, Porcher. 

Oct. 30, 1885. .Stoney, Win. E., d Gaillard. 

April 15, 1907. .Strauch, Mrs. Maude Mitchell, New York, N. Y Macon. 

April 14, 1914. .Sublette, Dr. S. O., Versailles, Ky Sublette, DuPuy. 

April 14, 1916. .Sylvan, Mrs. J. B., Columbia, S. C Trezevant. 

April 13, 1904. .Taliaferro, Mrs. S., San Antonio, Texas, c. ..Poyas, DeLesseleine. 
April 13, 1914. .Tanner, Mrs. Kenneth S. (Sarah Huger), Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Bacot, de Berniere, Huger, de Saus- 

sure, Peronneau. 

April 22, 1908. .Tate, Mrs. Joseph B., Asheville, N. C Huger. 

April 16, 1913. .Taylor, B. F., Columbia, S. C, l.m Manigault. 

April 14, 1916. .Taylor, George W., Demopolis, Ala Trezevant. 

Aug. 22, 1898. .Taylor, Miss A. H., Columbia, S. C, r Manigault. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



87 



April 14, 


1916 


April 20, 


1906 


April 14, 


1916 


April 7, 


1900 


April 14, 


1916 


April 13, 


1915 


April 14, 


1890. 


April 13, 


1905 


April 13, 


1885. 


April 13, 


1914 


April 13, 


1914 


April 13, 


1910 


April 13, 


1914. 


April 2, 


1885. 


April 14, 


1916. 


April 15, 


1907 


April 19, 


1911 


April 15, 


1907 


Oct. 30, 


1885 


April 13, 


1888 


Mar. 19, 


1890 


April 15, 


1909 


Oct. 9, 


1890 


April 16, 


1913 


April 13, 


1904 



April 19 

April 14 
April 13 
April 15 
April 13 
April 13 
April 21 
April 14 

April 13 

April 13 
April 13 
April 13 



1911 

1916 
1905 
1907 
1905 
1905 
1900 
1916 

1885 

1885 
1910 
1914 



.Taylor, Mrs. Lena P., Shawhan, Ky La Rue. 

.Taylor, Mrs. M. J., Charleston, S. C Gros. 

.Terrill, Mrs. W. E., Holden, Mo Agee. 

. Terry, Mrs. E. G., Aiken, S! C Giber I. 

.Thomas, Miss Annie E., Charleston, S. C Thomas. 

.Thomas, Claude, Charleston, S. C Thomas. 

.Thomas, John P., Columbia, S. C Couturier, Gut guard, 

DeLeslcine, Peyre. 

.Thomas, Mrs. Lottie R., Charleston, S. C Bounetheau. 

.Thomas, Stephen, Charleston, S. C.,* d Thomas. 

.Thomas, Stephen (2nd), Charleston, S. C, d. . Thomas. 

.Thomas, Stephen (3rd), Charleston, S. C Thomas. 

Thomas, Robert G., Charleston, S. C Gui guard. 

.Thomas, Jos. C, Charleston, S. C Thomas. 

.Thomas, Dr. T. Gaillard, New York, N. Y.,* d Gaillard. 

.Thomas, J. Waties, Columbia, S. C Couturier, Guignard, 

DeLesleine, Peyre. 

.Thompson, Miss Mary Elliott, Baltimore, Md deMarbeuf. 

.Thompson, Thomas Clarkson, Chattanooga, Tenn Horry. 

.Tilton, Mrs. Henrietta B. N., Seattle, Wash Hannah 

Cook {Walloon). 

.Toomer, Miss M. E., r Sarazin. 

. . Trapier, Rev. R. S., d Trapier. 

. Trapier, T. D., r Trapier. 

.Trescot, Miss Katharine Bocquet, Clemson College, S. C 

Bosquet, Mazyck, LeSerurier, Gigui-. 

Hat, DuPre. 

. .Trezevant, T. J., Dallas, Texas Trezevant. 

.Tresevant, M. B., New Orleans, La Trezevant. 

.Turner, Rev. Charles H. B., Waycross, Ga Tourneur, 

Poinsette, F anchor aud, Durouzean, 

Jaquet, de Carpcntier. 
; .Turner, Mrs. Nettie Viola Chastain, c, New Smyrna, Fla 

Chastain. 

.Tyler, Dr. Lyon G., Williamsburg, Va Contesse. 

.Vaill, Mrs. Charlotte F. S., Portland, Md., d Moleyn. 

.Vaill, E. G., Portland, Me Moleyn, Byssell. 

.Vaill, F. S., Portland, Me Moleyn. 

.Vaill, Miss Julia C, Portland, Me Moleyn. 

. VanderHorst, Mrs. A. A., Charleston, S. C, d Gibert. 

.Van de Sande-Bakhuyzen, Mrs. Adrian, New York, N. Y 

Trezevant. 
Vedder, Rev. Chas. S., Charleston, S. C* Pastor Emeritus 

Huguenot Church. 

. Verner, J. S., Columbia, S. C.,* c Vemer. 

.Viley, Breckenridge, Versailles, Ky. . .Martin, Guerrant, Trabue. 
. Vurpillot, Rev. Florian, Charleston, S. C, Pastor Huguenot Church. 



88 



TRANSACTIONS 



April 16, 1916. 
April 2, 1885 



April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

Oct. 

April 

April 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



20, 1906. 

14, 1916. 

15, 1905. 
13, 1910. 

16, 1913. 
13, 1910. 

13, 1905. 

14, 1916. 
14, 1916. 
13, 1905. 
13, 1885. 

13, 1885. 
30, 1885 

14, 1916. 
13, 1901. 



14, 1916. 
14, 1916. 

14, 1916. 
13, 1905. 
16,. 1913. 

15, 1907. 
15, 1909 
13, 1915 
22, 1908 



April 14, 1916 
April 15, 1912 



April 22, 1908 

April 14, 1916 

Nov. 1, 1899 

April 22, 1908 

April 2, 1885 

April 13, 1899 

April 15, 1903 

April 13, 1905 

April 13, 1885 



Vincent, Mrs. M. W., Texarkana, Ark Trezevant. 

.Walker, Mrs. E. C, Atlanta, (la.,* r Ravencl, Priuliau, 

Mazyck, LeSerurier. 

.Wallace, Mrs. Helen Yates, Charleston, S. C Legare. 

.Ward, Mrs. Samuel N., Georgetown, S. C Marbeuf. 

.Ware, Mrs. Mary S., f Mar ye. 

.Waties, Miss Katherine Calhoun, Columbia, S. C, r. . . .Mazyzk. 

.Watts, Mrs. M. W., Wichita Falls, Texas Dupuy. 

.Wat es, Thomas, Houston, Texas, Mazyck. 

. \Vatkins, Heyward I.,d Trezevant. 

.Watson, Mrs. A. Briggs, Beaufort, S. C Bonneau. 

. Weathersbee, Mrs. M. F., Williston, S. C Tluumuy. 

.Weeks, Mrs. Washington Hunter, Washington, D. C, c. .Macon. 

. Westervelt, Mrs. Emily P., Greenville, S. C.,* c Gaillard. 

. Westervelt, J. Irving, Greenville, S. C.,* c. . . . Gaillard. 

.Whaley, W. Gibbes, Charleston, S. C, r Peronneau. 

.Whitman, Edward Bostick, Philadelphia, Pa Hubert. 

.Wickham, Mrs. Julia Porcher, Lorraine, Va Porcher, Peyre, 

Mazyck, LeNoble, LeSerurier, de 
Cherigny. 

.Wienges, Frederick L., St. Matthews, S. C Trezevant. 

. Wienges, O. H., St. Matthews, S. C Trezevant. 

.Wilds, John L., Chicago, 111 Trezevant. 

.Wilbur, T. S., Charleston, S. C Cuthoneau. 

. Wilbur, W. Cuttino, Charleston, S. C Cuthoneau. 

.Wilbur, Walter B., Charleston, S. C Cuthoneau. 

.Wilcox, John, Marion, S. C Trezevant. 

.Wilkinson, Mrs. Earnest, Washington, D. C Robert. 

.Wilkinson, Mrs. L. B. W., Washington, D. C.,r DuPuy, 

LeVillain. 
Williams, Mrs. Arthur M., Georgetown, S. C Marbeuf. 

.Williams, Mrs. Mary Ophelia Hall, Baton Rouge, La 

Le Serurier, Poyas, Trezevant Ma- 
zyck, Gendrou, La Gcr. 

.Williams, Mrs. Serena Chestnut, Baltimore, Md., r Gibert, 

Pettigru. 

.Williams, Trezevant, Washington, D. C Trezevant. 

.Williams, Dr. T. Whitridge, Baltimore, Md Maury, 

Fontaine. 

.Willis, Miss A. II., Charleston, S. C Shecut, Gabeau. 

.Willis, Edward, Charleston, S. G.,* d Shecut, Gabeau. 

.Willis, Miss Eola, Charleston, S. C Shecut, Gabeau. 

.Willis, T. II., Charleston, S. C Shecut, Gabeau. 

.Wilson, Dr. G. Eraser, c Vergcreau, Boudinot. 

.Wilson, James Mazyck,* (/ Mazyzk Ravencl, LeNoble, 

de St. Julian, LeSerurier. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



89 



Mar. 31, 1890. 



April 19, 1897 



April 21, 1900 
April 13, 1904 

April 10, 1899 



April 14, 1916 
April 19, 1897 



April 14, 1916. 
April 22, 1908. 

April 14, 1916. 
April 13, 1902. 

May 14, 1898. 

April 13, 1905. 
April 15, 1909. 
April 19, 1911. 
April 13, 1902. 
April 14, 1916. 
April 14, 1916 
April 14, 1916 
April 14, 1916 
April 13, 1902 
April 19, 1911. 
April 13, 1902 
April 14, 1916 
April 5, 1890 
April 15, 1907 



.Wilson, Rev. Robert, D.D., Charleston, S. C, II. M. . ..Mazyck, 

Ruvcnel, LeNoble, de St. Julien, Le 

Serurier. 
Wilson, Robert, Jr., M.D., Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

Ravcncl, LeNuble, de St. Julien, 

LeScruricr. 
.Wilson, Mrs. Robert, Jr., Charleston, S. C . . .Gendrun, Porcher. 
Wilson, Miss S. Annie, r Mazyck, Le Noble, Ravtnel, 

LeSerurier, de St. Julien. 

.Wilson, Miss Sue Guignard, Charleston, S. C, d Mazyck, 

* Ravtnel, de St. Julien, Guignard, 

DeLesleine, Le Serurier, Le Noble. 

.Wilson, Mrs. M. S., Boston, Mass Serre. 

.-Wilson, Miss Susan Ravenel, Charleston, S. C Mazyck, 

Ravcncl, LeNoble, de St. Julien, Le 

Serurier. 

.Wilson, Mrs. W. W., Savannah, Ga Rembert. 

. Witherspoon, Mrs. M. V., Versailles, Ky Trabue, Guerrant, 

Martin. 

.Witherspoon, Warren V., Lexington, Ky Martian. 

. Witte, Mrs. Ida Reeves, Charleston, S. C Bounetheau. 

Legare. 

.Witte, Mrs. Rosa Glen, Charleston, S. C Bounetheau. 

» Legare. 

.Woods, Hon. Charles A., Marion, S. C DuBose. 

.Woods, Malcolm C, Marion, S. C DuBose. 

.Woods, Robert F., Darlington, S. C DuBose. 

.Woods, W. D., Darlington, S. C, c '....• DuBose. 

.Woodson, E. DuPuy, Pineville, Ky DuPuy. 

.Woodson, Grattan C, Middleboro, Ky DuPuy. 

.Woodson, Matthew, Middleboro, Ky DuPuy. 

.Woodson, Henry N., Kansas City, Mo DuPuy. 

.Worcester, Mrs. Davie L., Cincinnati, Ohio, d ..DuPrt. 

.Wright, Mrs. Anne Minis, Jackson, Miss Perrine. 

.Wright, Mrs. Hannah McC, Savannah, Ga Turquand. 

.Yates, Miss Elizabeth W., Columbia, S. C Trezevant 

.Young, Henry E., Charleston, S. C Gourdin. 

.Zachry, Mrs. Elise Thompson, New York, N. Y Horry, 

LaRoche, Ogier. 



90 TRANSACTIONS 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE SOCIETY 

Transactions No. 1. Published in 1889. 

An account of the organization of the Society in 1885. 

List of charter members. 

List of officers, 1885 to 1889. 

Memorial to Genl. Wilmot G. deSaussure, late president of the Society. 

Short sketches of the lives of late members. 

President Daniel Ravenel's Anniversary Address. 

Address by Wm. St. Julien Jervey, Esq., delivered at the Anniversary Meet- 
ing, April 13, 1889. 
Transactions No. 2. Published in 1889. 

An historical sermon delivered at the French Protestant Church, on Sun- 
day, April 13, 1890, by the Rev. Charles S. Vedder, D.D., Pastor; with 
picture of Church and List of Pastors from 1886 to 1890. 

Proceedings of the Anniversary Meeting, April 14, 1890. 

List of officers and new members. 

Ivry, a poem by Rev. C. S. Vedder, D.D. 

An address before the Society by Hon. Thomas F. Bayard. 
Transactions No. 3. Published in 1894. 

Report of President Wm. St. Julien Jervey, at Anniversary Meeting, April 
13, 1891, and list of officers of the Society. 

President's Address at Anniversary Meetings of 1893 and 1894. 

List of officers and list of members elected since 1890. 

Short sketches of the lives of deceased members. 

An address before the Society, on the Early Huguenots and their Emigration 
to America, by Gabriel E. Manigault, M.D. 
Transactions No. 4. Published in 1897. 

Papers on some Early Huguenot Families in South Carolina: a, The Legare 
Family; b, The Huger Family, with pedigree; c, The Marion Family; 
d, The Manigault Family from 1665 to 1886, with portraits. 

A paper on the Huguenot Influence in Colonial South Carolina, by Rev, 
Robt. Wilson, D.D. 

Sketches of the lives of late deceased members of the Society. 
Transactions No. 5. Published in 1898. 

The First Huguenot Immigrants from 1670 to 1680, 1680 to 1690, 1690 to 
1700. 

Hostility of the English Settlers to the French. 

Naturalization of Huguenot Refugees. 

List of names of French and Swiss Huguenots Refugees in Carolina. 

Character of the Huguenots. 

The Huguenot Church in South Carolina; St. John's Parish, Berkley; St. 
Denis' Parish, "Orange Quarter;" Settlement and Church on Santee River. 

The Huguenots of Abbeville, S. C. 

Founding of the South Carolina Society of Charleston. 

Notices of Conspicuous Members of the Gaillard Family. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 91 

Transactions No. 6. Published in 1899. 

An Historical Sketch of the Prioleau Family in Europe and America, with 
illustrations, by Rev. Robt. Wilson, D.D., and Gabriel Manigault, M.D. 

The Ravenel Family in Trance and America, by Daniel Ravenel, Sr. 

Necrology 1896-1897. 
Transactions No. 7. Published in 1900. 

Proceedings of the Fifteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, April 21, 
1900. 

List of officers. 

An Historical Sketch of the Huguenot Congregations of South Carolina: 
French Santee; Orange Quarter; St. John's, Berkley; the Church at Charles- 
ton: etc. — by the late Daniel Ravenel, of Charleston, with notes by the 
late Gen. Wilmot G. DeSaussure, of Charleston. 
Transactions No. 8. Published in 1901. 

Proceedings of the Sixteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, April 13, 
1901. 

Anniversary address of President Robert Wilson, D.D. 

Resume of Transactions, 1897 to 1901. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 

List of members with names of original Huguenot Families from whom de- 
scended. 

Letter from the Honorable Alfred Huger, upon the death of Mr. Petigru. 

A Narrative of the Life and Services of Francis G. DeLieseline during the 
War of the American Revolution, contributed by Dr. Wm. C. Ravenel. 
Transactions No. 9. Published in 1902. 

Minutes of the Seventeenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, April 17, 
1902. 

The President's address. 

An address on the Early Huguenots, delivered before the Society by Col. 
Richard L. Maury, of Richmond, Va. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 

Enlarged and revised list of members, with name or names of persons from 
whom they derive their descent. 
Transactions No. 10. Published in 1903. 

Minutes of the Eighteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held April 
15, 1903. 

List of officers. 

The President's Address. 

Report of officers. 

Some wills of South Carolina Huguenots; copies in original French, with 
translations in English. 

A paper, entitled The Huguenots in Dublin, by Rev. Robert Wilson, D.D. 
Transactions No. 11. Published in 1904. 

Minutes of the Nineteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held April 
13, 1904. 

Anniversary Address of President Robert Wilson. 

A brief memorial to Francis Marion. 



92 TRANSACTIONS 

"The Huguenots of South Carolina," an Address before the Society, by Mr. 

Thomas W. Bacot. 
Some wills of South Carolina Huguenots; copies in original French, with 

translations in English; with comments by Rev. Robert Wilson, I). I). 

Continued from No. 10. 
Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 
Transactions No. 12. Published in 1905. 

Minutes of the Twentieth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held April 

13, 1905. 
List of officers. 
Report of officers. 

The President's Anniversary Address. 

Huguenot Immigration in South Carolina by Henry A. DeSaussure, Esq. 
A Short Story of Three Brothers, by Ida H. Layard. 
Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 
Constitution and By-Laws. 
Transactions No. 13. Published in 1906. 

Minutes of the Twenty-first Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held April 

20, 1906. 
List of officers. 
Report of officers. 
Anniversary Address of President. 

The French Protestant Church, Paper read by Miss Ravenel. 
Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

Upper Beat of St. John's, Berkley, by late Prof. F. A. Porcher. 
Antoine Gabeau, by Miss Willis. 
Additional Data on Cordes Family. Maj. J. J. Lucas and D. E. Huger 

Smith, Esq. 
Old Document on Bruneau Family. Mr. A. S. Salley, Jr. 
Notes from Cr^ttet MSS. 
Transactions No. 14. Published in 1907. 
List of officers. 

Minutes of Twenty-second Anniversary Meeting. 
Report of officers. 
The President's Address. 

Huguenots on Santee River, by the late Henry A. DeSaussure. 
Wills of South Carolina Huguenots, Editorial Notes. 
Dr. J. L. E. W. Shecut, Miss Eola Willis. 
Ribault's Fort, Miss Isabelle DeSaussure. 
Notes on Gaillard Family. 

Letter from Benj. Ma/.yck to Capt. Daniel Ravenel, dated June 28, 1776. 
List of members. 
Constitution and By-Laws. 
Transactions No. 15. Published in 1908. 
List of officers. 

Minutes of the Twenty-third Anniversary Meeting. 
Treasurer's Statement. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 93 

Report of Historian. 

The President's Anniversary Address. 

Poem. The Bretons. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

Editorial Notes. 

Notice of Rene" Ravenel, Immigrant. 

The Last of the Huguenots. Stephen Thomas. 

The Isle of Oleron. M. M. de Richmond and M. Paul Thomas. 

List of members, revised. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 
Transactions No. 16. Published in 1909. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of Twenty-fourth Anniversary Meeting. 

Reports of officers. 

The President's Anniversary Address. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

The State of French Protestants after 1685. 

Correspondence relative to gift to Society of site of Old Goose Creek French 
Church. 

Plats showing site of old Goose Creek French Church. 

The French Huguenot Church of the Parish of St. James, Goose Creek. 

List of members, revised. 
Transactions No. 17. Published in 1910. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of Twenty-fifth Anniversary Meeting. 

Reports of officers. 

The President's Annual Address. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

The Huguenots in America. By Hon. A. T. Clearwater. 

Notes on Theodore Sompayrac. 

Letter concerning Rev. Mons. Pouderous. 

Huguenot Lineage of Erroll II . Colcock. 

Book Notices: "Les I'reies Gibert." The Journal of American History, Vol. 
XIX, No. Ill, 3d Quarter. 

List of members. 
Transactions No. 18. Published in 1911. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of Twenty-sixth Anniversary Meeting. 

Reports of officers. 

The President's Anniversary Address. 

Account of Porcher Family, by Mrs. Wickham. 

Book Notices — La Reforme dans LTsle D'Oleron, Par Paul Thomas, Capaci- 
tiiire en Droit. Ouvrage Orne de onze illustrations. Lezay. Imprimerie- 
Libraire H. Canon. 1911. 
Transactions No. 19. Published in 1912. 

List of officers. 

Minutes of the Twenty-seventh Anniversary Meeting. 



94 TRANSACTIONS 

Reports of officers. 

The President's Anniversary Address. 

The French Protestants of Abbeville, S. C, 1761-1765. 

List of South Carolina names in the registers of the French Churches in 

England. 
An address on Huguenots in America. 
Revised list of members of the Society. 
Transactions No. 20— Published in 1915. 
List of officers 1913-1914. 

Minutes of the Twenty-eighth Anniversary Meeting. 
Report of OiTicers Twenty-eighth Anniversary Meeting. 
List of officers 1914-1915. 

Minutes of Twfenty-ninth Anniversary Meeting. 
Report of Officers Twenty-ninth Anniversary Meeting. 
The President's Address, April 13, 1914. 
Charter of the Society. 
Deed of Conveyance of Old Huguenot Goose Creek Church site to the Society 

with sketch map. 
Picture of Granite Cross marking site of Old French Protestant Church at the 

head of Goose Creek, S. C. 
"The Edict of Toleration 1787." Address delivered by the Rev. Florian 

Vurpillot. 
The late David du Bose Gaillard, Lieutenant Colonel U. S. Army, with picture 

of monument in Huguenot Church. 
"The Huguenots" from Daily Telegraph, London, England, with a picture of 

an Old Huguenot Church in London. 
Huguenots, the First Textile Manufacturers. 
Transactions No. 21. Published 1916. 
List of officers 1915-1916. 

Minutes of the Thirtieth Anniversary Meeting. 
The President's Address, April 13, 1915. 
Report of Officers, Thirtieth Anniversary Meeting. 

"The Planters of St. John's," Address delivered by Professor Yates Snowden. 
"The Influence of the Huguenots in the United States of America," Dr. 

J. G. B. Bulloch of Washington, D. C. 
"The Influence of the Huguenots in the United States of America," By 

O. B. DuBois, of Weehawken, N. J. 
A Certificate of Naturalization. 
An Interesting and Valuable Old Record. Photographic reproduction of 

pages in old Probate Court record book 1692 to 1700. 
An Interesting Old Document. 

AH members In good standing receive the Transactions from date of their mem- 
bership without charge. A list of such numbers of the Transactions as may be extant, 
with the prices of same, can be had by any one desiring copies upon application to 
the Secretary. 

Address all communications to Daniel Ravenel, Secretary, No. 54 Broad Street, 
Charleston, S. C. 



INDEX 

Pat* 

Address of the President 89 

Address of Col. Alexander R. Lawton 19-36 

Application Blank after Index 

By-Laws of Society 61-62 

Constitution of Society 59-61 

Deaths, 1915-1916 74 

Executive Committee's Report, 1916 10-14 

Historian's Report, 1916 16 

List of Members 63-89 

Marion Family 37-49 

Minutes of Anniversary Meeting, 1916 6-7 

Minutes of Special Meeting 1 7-18 

New Members, 1915-1916 11-13 

Notes of Information to Members, etc 3 

Officers, 1916-1917 5 

Publications of Society 90-94 

Treasurer's Report, 1916 15 

Will of Benjamin Marion 50-58 



TRANSACTIONS 

OF THE 

Huguenot Society 

OF 

South Carolina 

No. 23 

PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY 




(INCORPORATED JUNE 21, 1909) 



CHARLESTON, S. C. 
1917 



NOTES 

The Huguenot Society is not local in its scope, its member- 
ship including persons of approved Huguenot descent from all 
parts of the world. 

Every member is urged to use the application in the back of 
this book, and secure for the Society at least one new member. 

Certificates of Membership will be mailed to members immedi- 
ately after their election. 



The Society Pins or Badges may be obtained by members 
from the Secretary, postage free, at the rate of $3.00 for those 
enameled on silver, or $5.00 for those enameled on gold. The 
Pin represents the Seal of the Society, and is about the size of a 
quarter of a dollar. 



Owing to the large increase in membership in the past two or 
three years and the demand from libraries in various parts of the 
world, several numbers of the Transactions of the Society have 
become exhausted, and we are anxious to obtain copies of the 
following numbers, 1, 3, 4, 7, 8, 13, 17, 18, 19. 

The Society would appreciate gifts of any of these numbers. 



It does not seem generally known among the members of the 
Huguenot Society of South Carolina that the life membership 
is only twenty dollars — this having been recently brought to 
the attention of a few of the.members, six of them, who had been 
paying annual dues, at once became life members. 



Members of the Society are earnestly requested to notify the 
Secretary of change in residence and post office address, and cliangc 
of name by marriage — also, of any deaths of members, which may 
come to their knowledge. 

3 



OFFICERS 1917-1918 

President 

THOMAS W, BACOT 

29 Broad Street 

Charleston, S. C. 

Vice-Presidents 

For "Charleston 1 '— WM. C. MILLER 

For "Goose Creek 11 — SAMUEL G. STONEY 

For "Orange Quarter (St. Denis) 11 — T. GRANGE SIMONS, M.D. 

For "French Sanies 11 — ALFRED HUGER 

For "St. John's, Berkley 11 — -D. E. HUGER SMITH 

For "Puryshurg"—C. BISSELL JENKINS 

For "New Bordeaux' 1 — CHAS. P. ALLSTON 

Secretary and Treasurer 

DANIEL RAVENEL 

54 Broad Street 
Charleston, S. C. 

Historian 
VVM. G. MAZYCK 

Chaplain 
THE REV. FLORIAN VURPILLOT 



The President, Vice-Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer, and 
Historian are ex officio members of the Executive Committee — and 
all ex-Presidents are advisory members. 



5 '<>K 



MINUTES 

Charleston, S. C, 13th April, 1917. 

The Thirty-second Anniversary Meeting of the Huguenot 
Society of South Carolina was held at 5 o'clock p.m. this day 
at the Hall of the South Carolina Society on Meeting Street — 
the President in the chair. On account of the unavoidable 
absence of the Secretary, Mr. Eugene N. Simons was requested 
to act as Secretary pro tern. 

The meeting was opened with a prayer by the Reverend 
Robert Wilson, D.D. 

The minutes of the previous Anniversary Meeting on the 
14th April, 1916, and also of the Special Meeting held on the 
22nd May, 1916, was read by the secretary pro tern, and were 
confirmed and adopted. 

The President then made his annual address, and also sub- 
mitted and read the annual report of the Executive Committee. 
The Historian presented and read his annual report. The 
annual account of the Treasurer was rendefed and read — and 
Messrs. Theodore H. Willis and John B. Reeves were named 
as a committee to audit the same, as required by Section 4 of 
Article IV of the Constitution. 

The said address of the President was ordered to be printed 
in the next Transactions (No. 23) of the Society 1 — and the 
said reports of the Executive Committee- and the Historian 3 
and the said account of the Treasurer 1 were received as informa- 
tion and also ordered to be printed along with these minutes 
in the said next Transactions. 

On motion of Mr. W. C. Miller (which was seconded), the 
several four (4) resolutions recommended by the Executive 
Committee 5 were unanimously adopted by the Society. 

1 See page 10 post. 
• - See page 14 post. 

3 See page 22 post. 

4 See page 21 post. 
6 See page 20 post. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 7 

The next business in order being the election of new members, 
on motion of Mr. F. K. Myers (which was seconded) the one 
hundred and twenty-eight (128) applicants for membership 
(favorably reported by the Executive Committee in its said 
annual report, 6 two of them being applicants for life-member- 
ship) were unanimously elected members by the members of 
the Society present — as required by Section 6 of Article III 
of the Constitution. 

Reports of special committees were then called for by the 
President, but none were made. 

Under the next order of business ("miscellaneous business") 
Mr. Wm. G. Mazyck, the Historian, speaking to the matter of 
a proper place for the Library of the Society, as urged by the 
Executive Committee in its annual report, 7 confirmed the state- 
ment of the Executive Committee, and, emphasizing the abso- 
lute necessity for such a place and saying that previous efforts 
had been made to secure such a place but without result, moved 
that a special committee of three members of the Society other 
than its officers (to be appointed by the President) be charged 
with the duty of seeking for such a place. But Mr. W. C. Miller 
stated that the special committees heretofore appointed for 
such purpose had failed, and moved as a substitute that the 
Executive Committee be authorized and empowered to provide 
a place for the Library of the Society. The substitute moved 
by Mr. Miller, being seconded, was adopted. 

On motion, made by Mr. Alfred Huger and seconded, the 
following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved^ That the grateful appreciation and unfeigned thanks 
of the Society be expressed to Miss Isabelle deSaussure and 
Mrs. Harmon Miller and Dr. Ashley Scovel for their donations 
of valuable books. 

The election of officers being in order, it was resolved (on 
motion made by Mr. E. Heyward Bowly and seconded) that 
a committee of three (3) be appointed by the chair to nominate 

6 See page sl6-18 post. 

7 See page 19 post. 



8 TRANSACTIONS 

the officers of the Society for the ensuing year — whereupon the 
chair appointed Messrs. E. Heyward Bowly and F. K. Myers 
and W. B. Ravenel as such committee, and the Committee 
retired. 

While the Society was awaiting the return and report of the 
said Committee on- nominations, the President took occasion to 
read a telegram from Hon. A. T. Clearwater of Kingston, N. V., 
a distinguished life-member of the Society, expressing his 
regret at being unable to be present on this the Thirty-second 
Anniversary of the Society. And the President also extended 
the greetings of the Society to Mr. John DuFay, of Newport, 
R. I.., a member of the "Huguenot Society of America" of New 
York City, who was present by invitation, to which Mr. DuFay 
responded felicitously and expressed his pleasure at being pres- 
ent and offered his congratulations to the Huguenot Society 
of South Carolina on its prosperity and influence. 

The said Committee on nominations then returned and 
reported the following nominations for the officers of the Society 
during the coming year: 

President — Thomas W. Bacot. 

Vice-President for "Charleston" — William C. Miller. 

Vice-President for "Goose Creek" — Samuel G. Stoney. 

Vice-President for "Orange Quarter (St. Denis) 1 *— T. Grange 
Simons, M.D. 

Vice-President for "French Santee" — Alfred Huger. 

V ice-President for "St. John's, Berkley"— D. E. Huger Smith. 

Vice-President for "Purysburg" — C. Bissell Jenkins. 

Vice-President for "New Bordeaux"— -Charles P. Allston. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Daniel Ravenel. 

Historian — William G. Mazyck. 

Chaplain— The Reverend -Florian Vurpillot. 

Thereupon the President called Mr. J. R. P. Ravenel to the 
chair, and (on motion made and seconded) the said report of 
the Committee on nominations was received and the said 
nominees were unanimously elected as the Officers of the Society 
for the year commencing 13th April, 1917. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 9 

The President then took the chair, and, after expressing his 
gratification and pleasure at his re-election and his abiding 
interest in the Society and. his fraternal regard for its members 
and all other Huguenots, he introduced the Hon. Henry A. 
duPont of Winterthur, Delaware, who, by special invitation, 
had come down, at great inconvenience to himself, to deliver an 
address before the Society, saying: "We are very highly honored 
in having to address us, on this our Thirty-second Anniversary, 
a scholar and a statesman and a distinguished member of our 
Society. I now have the peculiar pleasure and the personal 
privilege of introducing the Hon. Henry A. duPont, recently 
United States Senator from the State of Delaware." 

Upon the conclusion of Senator duPont's entertaining and 
scholarly address the President rose and said: "We are under 
lasting obligation to Senator duPont for this remarkable evidence 
of his loyalty to Huguenots generally and his interest in the 
Huguenot Society of South Carolina in particular — our apprecia- 
tion cannot find fit verbal expression, but silently prompts us 
to ask for the manuscript of his very able and absorbing address, 
in order that it may have an enduring place by being perpet- 
uated in our printed Transactions." 8 

The Thirty-second Anniversary Meeting of the Society was 
then adjourned, and the members with their guests united in 
social intercourse and partook of a collation. 

Eugene N. Simons, 
Secretary pro tern, 

8 See the address at pages 24-36 post. 



10 TRANSACTIONS 

THE PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

Fellow-members of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina — 
Ladies and Gentlemen: 

In the order of business, it is now my duty and pleasure to 
make the usual annual address of the President. First and 
foremost, your attention must be directed to the phenomenal 
growth of the Society — the one hundred and twenty-eight 
(128) applicants for membership (two of whom are appli- 
cants for life-membership), about to be reported by the Execu- 
tive Committee, 1 bringing the number of members up to nearly 
seven hundred ! 

In the past year there have been four (4) deaths of members, 
which the Executive Committee will report in detail. Of two 
of them, however, I must be permitted to say a word by way of 
eulogy. (1) The Reverend Charles S. Vedder, D.D., LL.D., 
for over half a century the Pastor and Pastor Emeritus of the 
French Protestant or Huguenot Church of Charleston, and for 
years before his decease the Nestor of the Christian Ministers 
of the City of Charleston if not of the whole State of South 
Carolina, and one of the "Charter Members" of this Society. 
He was eminent in faith and works and also in scholarship, 
and was ever a very loyal and valuable member of this Society, 
and his noble character and scholarly attainments made him 
a beloved and conspicuous citizen of the community in which 
he chose to spend his life from early manhood. Having passed 
far beyond four-score years, his strength in his last years was 
"then but labor and sorrow," from which he now rests in Para- 
dise, awaiting "the general Resurrection in the last day, and 
the life of the world to come, through our Lord Jesus Christ," 
Whose faithful disciple and servant he verily was. (2) Mrs. 
Caroline DuPuy Bassett, of Windsor, Missouri, who had nearly 
reached her four-score years, and who secured more members 
for the. Society than anyone else, and of whom no member of the 

1 See pages 16-18 post. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 11 

Society was more earnest and enthusiastic and loyal in word and 
deed. I took occasion, in my last annual address (Transactions 
No. 22, 1916, page 8), to make special mention of "this 
'Ancient Lady' and gentle and loyal Huguenot," who was then 
with us in the flesh and animated with the hope of doing more 
for the Society in the years to come than she had been able to 
do in the years preceding — but the "Reaper, whose name is 
Death," has, "with his sickle keen," reaped "the bearded grain 
at a breath," and has gathered her into the garner of God. 

In my last annual address (Transactions No. 22, 191 6, page 9) 
was mentioned the change of the name of a station of the Sea- 
board Air Line Railway Company, just south of the Santee 
River, from "Wren" (as it had been called) to historic "James- 
town" — and since then (through Congressman Richard S. 
Whaley and Hon. D. C. Roper, First Assistant Post Master 
General) I have succeeded in getting the Post Office Depart- 
ment to change the name of the post-office likewise from "Wren" 
to "Jamestown," there being no other post-office by the name 
of "Jamestown" in the State of South Carolina. This station 
and post-office is, as you know, very near to the site of old but 
now extinct Jamestown of "French Santee." (For an elaborate 
account of old Jamestown, by the Hon. Henry A. M. Smith, 
see The So. Ca. Historical and Genealogical Magazine of 
October, 1908, vol. IX, No. 4, pages 220-227.) 

Again, let me remind you that, when this Society was founded 
in 1885, only three original Huguenot centres or settlements in 
South Carolina were in view, to wit: (1) "Charleston," (2) 
"Purysburg," and (3) "New Bordeaux" (see Section 7 of the 
then By-Laws); but, by dint of search and re-search, we now 
know that there were four others, to wit: (1) "Goose Creek," 
(2) "Orange Quarter (St. Denis)," (3) "French Santee," and 
(4) "St. John's, Berkley," making in all seven (7) original 
distinct and separate Huguenot centres or settlements in this 
State (see the President's Address in Transactions No. 20, 
1914, page 20, at pages 22-23)— and so (among other amend- 
ments) Section 7 of the then By-Laws was accordingly amended 



12 TRANSACTIONS 

on the 22nd May, 1916, and now reads as follows: — "Section 
7 . The original Huguenot centres or settlements in this State 
(each one of which is entitled to a Vice-President) are as fol- 
lows: (1) Charleston, (2) Goose Creek, (3) Orange Quarter 
(St. Denis), (4) French Santee, (5) St. John's, Berkley, (6) 
Purysburg, and (7) New Bordeaux." (See Transactions No. 
22, 1916, pages 17-18, and also pages 60 and 62.) In each of 
the said seven (7) centres or settlements there was organized 
and established a French Protestant or Huguenot Church, and 
in each a House of Worship was erected — the sites of two (2) 
of which Houses of Worship are marked, viz.: (1) the site of 
that in the "Charleston" centre or settlement by the Church 
Building at the south-east corner of Church and Queen Streets 
in the City of Charleston, which was long ago erected -and 
(2) the site of that in the "Goose Creek" centre or settlement 
by a granite Cross and four granite corner posts, which were 
erected by this Society in July, 1909, (see Transactions No. 17, 
1910, page 12, and Transactions No. 20, 1914, page 2, and 
pages 30-31). 

The sites of the Houses of Worship in the other five (5) centres 
or settlements, viz.: (1) "Orange Quarter (St. Denis)," (2) 
"French Santee," (3) "St. John's, Berkle)," (4) "Purysburg," 
and (5) "New Bordeaux," remain to be marked and ought 
likewise to be marked by appropriate and enduring monuments, 
as the Executive Committee will recommend. 2 The site in 
"Orange Quarter (St. Denis)" was referred to by me in my last 
annual address (Transactions No. 22, 1916, page 9) as having 
been "located with sufficient exactness to justify the Society 
in erecting a monument to perpetuate" it — and I am now glad 
to say that recently the site in "St. John's, Berkley" has been 
approximately located, Mr. Henry H. Ficken having very 
kindly taken Mr. D. E. Huger Smith and Mr. Robert B. Lebby 
and myself in his automobile up to "St. John's, Berkley" where 
Dr. Richard Y. D wight and Mr. S. Porcher Stoney aided in 
approximately locating it. 

2 See pages 19 and 20 post. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 13 

I must also call attention to a remarkable sketch of the Marion 
family by the late Hon. Richard Yeadon, a distinguished member 
of the Charleston Bar — it was published in a series of ten articles, 
nine of them appearing, about the year 1845, in Simm's Magazine 
(The Southern and Western Monthly Magazine and Review), 
Vols. I and II, pages 209, 270, 347 and 412 of Vol. I, and pages 
50, 121, 200, 265 and 333 of Vol. II; and the tenth and last 
appearing in the Courier of August 7, 1858 — the said magazine 
is not now extant, except one copy in the Charleston Library 
and one or two others perhaps in the hands of private individuals, 
and a copy of the said newspaper (the Courier) is in the Charles- 
ton Library. It is very desirable that such sketch should be 
re-published in the Transactions of this Society, with an adden- 
dum continuing it down to the present time (if possible). The 
Executive Committee will recommend that this be done, if the 
expense of so doing can be arranged for. 3 

Another important matter to be urged on the Society is the 
necessity of providing a local habitation for its valuable and 
growing Library — some of the books and papers are in my 
office, some in the Secretary's office, and others scattered about — 
it is, therefore, the imperative duty of the Society to make 
suitable provision for such purpose. The Executive Committee 
will make recommendation accordingly. 4 

It only remains for me to express delight with the improved 
and nourishing condition of the Society, and also to express 
the hope and expectation that it will go on increasing more and 
more in numbers and usefulness and in historical research and 
work. 



8 See page 19 and 20 post. 
* See page 19 post. 



14 TRANSACTIONS * 

REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

To the Huguenot Society of South Carolina: — ■ 

The Executive Committee reports as follows: 

No. 22 (1916) of the Transactions of the Society was issued 
in the early part of this year (1917), and a copy has been sent 
to each and every member of the Society — copies have also 
been sent to 'the following Libraries and Societies with which 
this Society exchanges, to wit: 

Boston Public Library, Boston, Mass. 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me. 

Bureau of Education, Washington, D. C. 

Charleston Library, Charleston, S. C. 

College of Charleston, Charleston, S. C. 

Columbia Library, Columbia, S. C. 

Columbia University, New York, N. Y. 

Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Ga. 

Historical Society of Penn., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Huguenot Society of America, New York, N. Y. 

Huguenot Society of London, London, England. 

Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, 111. 

Indiana University Library, Bloomington, Ind. 

Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas. 

Kentucky Historical Magazine, Frankfort, Ky. 

Librarie Francaise et Etrangere, 2 rue de l'Univercdte, Paris, France. 

Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

Maine Genealogical Society, Portland, Me. 

Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minn. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Society, Boston, Mass. 

New Hampshire State Library, Concord, N. H. 

National Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. 

New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, New York, N. Y. 

New York Historical Society, New York, N. Y. 

New York Public Library, New York, N. Y. 

New York State Historical Association, Albany, N. Y. 

New York State Library, Albany, N. Y. 

Princeton University Library, Princeton, N. J. 

Royal Colonial Institute, Northumberland Ave., London. 

Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D. C. 

Societe de l'Histoire du Protestantisme Francais, Paris, France. 

South Carolina College Library, Columbia, S. C. 

South Carolina Historical Society, Charleston, S. C. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 15 

Southern Historical Association, Washington, D. C. 

Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va. 

State Historical Society of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 

State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

State Library of Mass., Boston, Mass. 

St. Louis Public Library, St. Louis, Mo. 

The Huguenot Association, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

The Newberry Library, Chicago, 111. 

The Washington Historical Quarterly, Seattle, Wash. 

The Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, Ohio. 

University Club, New York, N. Y. 

University of California, Berkeley, Cal. 

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Yale University Library, New Haven, Conn. 

A list of members (made up to April 14, 1916, inclusive, and 
showing the name or names of the Huguenot family or families 
through which each member claims descent) was published in 
said Transactions (No. 22) — a further list will not be published 
in the next Transactions (No. 23) because of the heavy expense 
attending the same, but lists made up to future dates from time 
to time will probably be published occasionally in later Trans- 
actions. Of course, new members elected during the year 
ending April 13, 1917, will find their names recorded in this 
Report, and new members to be elected thereafter will find 
their names recorded in future Reports of the Executive Com- 
mittee respectively. 

Four (4) of our members have passed away during the past 
year, viz: — 

1. Mr. Alva B. Parry, of Charleston, S. C, on April 30, 1916. 

2. Mrs. Caroline DuPuy Bassett, of Windsor, Mo., on No- 
vember 23, 1916, in the eightieth year of her age — one of the 
oldest and most interested members of the Society. 

3. Mrs. John M. Bennett, of San Antonio, Tex., on November 
29,1916. 

4. The Reverend and the venerable Charles S. Vedder, D.D., 
LL.D., on March 1, 1917, in the ninety-first year of his age— a 
"Charter Member" of the Society, and one of its oldest and most 
distinguished members. 



16 TRANSACTIONS 

The names of ten (1.0) members have been stricken from the 
roll of membership under Section 5 of the By-Laws. 

The following one hundred and twenty eight (128; applicants 
for membership (two of whom are applicants for life member- 
ship) 1 are favorably reported: 

1. Achurch, Airs. Robert W Charleston, S. C. 

2. Barkley, M. B Charleston, S. C. 

3. Beckruan, A. Pelzer Charleston, S. C. 

4. Brewster, Miss Elizabeth Summit, N. J. 

5. Brewster, Miss Harriet Haines Summit, N. J. 

6. Brown, Mrs. Pauline S. M Georgetown, Texas. 

7. Bruns, Miss Anna Bell Charleston, S. C. 

8. Bruns, Miss Minnie C Charleston, S. C. 

9. Burnside, Mrs. Thomas W Lancaster, Ky. 

10. Bussey, Mrs. Annie Lawton Athens, Ga. 

11. Cain, James Ravenel Columbia, S. C. 

12. Cain, Mrs. William Pinopolis, S. C. 

13. Chester, Mrs. William F New York, N. Y. 

14. Clarke, Herbert William Norwich, N. Y. 

1.5. Clearwater, Thomas Hoffman (Life member) Kingston, N. Y. 

16. Clement, Miss Ruby Charleston, S. C. 

1 7. Colcock, R. H New Orleans, La. 

18. Colcock, R. H., Jr New Orleans, La. 

19. Coleman, Miss Myrtle C Columbia, S. C. 

20. Coleman, Miss Nell Columbia, S. C. 

2 1 . Collins, George R Cincinnati, Ohio. 

22. Cooper, Horace Crane Wilmington, N. C. 

23. Cotton, Mrs. Sarah E Sedalia, Mo. 

24. Crawley, Mrs. Louisa Davant Chevy Chase, D. C. 

25. Crawley, Miss Virginia F Chevy Chase, D. C. 

20. Darlington, Mrs. W. R \llendale, S. C. 

27. Davant, Thomas Stovell Roanoke, Ya. 

28. Davis, A. Edward, M.D New York, N. V. 

29. Davis, George E., M.D New York, N. Y. 

30. De Saussure, Charles A Memphis, Tenn. 

31. De Saussure, Thomas H Milledgeville, Ga. 

32. De Vane, Miss Anna Lee Red Springs, N. C. 

33. De Vane, Frank Lewis Greensboro, N. C. 

34. De Vane, John Murphy Fayetteville, N. C. 

35. Dickson, Albert P., Jr Williamsville, Ya. 

36. Dickson, Miss Florence Benson, N. C. 

37. Dickson, Thomas Wyatt Greenville, Pa. 

38. Du Bois, Mrs. B. Frank Mobile, Ala. 

1 This makes thirteen (13) life members in all. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOU I'll CAROLINA 17 

39. Du Hose, Miss Susan P Sewanec, Tenn. 

40. Dunkin, Miss Eliza linger Charl< siton, S. C. 

41. Faw, Miss Elizabeth, D. C Marietta, Ga. 

42. Finley, Mrs. Catherine S. II Charleston, S. C. 

43. Fleming, Mrs. W. L Baton Rouge, La. 

44. Fowler, Mrs. Clarence V New York, N. Y. 

45. Furman, Mrs. R. Keith Charleston, S. C. 

46. Gaillard, G. Walter, M.D Perdue Hill, Ala. 

47. Gaillard, Lawrence Lee Waterbury, Conn. 

48. Getzen, Mrs. Samuel Newberry, Fla. 

49. Gignilliat, Hey ward Savannah, Ga. 

50. Gignilliat, Ravcnel Savannah, Ga. 

51. Glore, Mrs. W. S Danville, Ky. 

52. Grant, Miss Anna May Riverside, 111. 

53. Grant, Mrs. Gertrude Q. W Riverside, 111. 

54. Gray, Mrs. Mary Mitchell Maysville, Ky. 

55. Grayson, Mrs. Jennie T Charlottesville, Va. 

56. Green, Mrs. Norvin E Louisville, Ky. 

57. Guerrant, Mrs. Peter D Los Angeles, Calif. 

58. Guerry, Le Grand, M.D Columbia, S. C. 

59. Guignard, Christopher G Columbia, S. C. 

60. Guimarin, Mrs. W. P> Columbia, S. C. 

61. Harris, David U . .Mobile, Ala. 

62. Heyward, Miss Isabel Bowen Charleston, S. C. 

63. Hillhouse, Lawrence P Greenville, S. C. 

64. Hillhouse, Miss Tweet ie Greenville, S. C. 

65. Hillhouse, William Laurens Luebo, Congo Beige, Africa. 

66. Hogan, Mrs. R. G Philadelphia, Pa. 

67. House, Mrs. Eva Cordes Charleston, S. C. 

68. Kenan, Thomas H "... .Milledgeville, Ga. 

69. King, Mrs. Gadsden Charleston, S. C. 

70. La Rue, Miss Matilda H .Shawhan, Ky. 

71. Lawrence, Mis. Susan E Brooklyn, N. V. 

11. Logan, Mis. Emma P. C St. Juseph, Mo. 

73. Loucks, Charles Olney -. . .Chicago, 111. 

74. Lucas, E. E Florence, S. C. 

75. Lucas, Edward Huger Florence, S. C. 

76. Lucas, Miss Florence LeNoble Pinopolis, S. C. 

77. Marion, John Hardin Chester, S. C. 

78. Mathews, Mrs. Helen C Cleveland, Ohio. 

79. Mayes, Mrs. J. A Savannah, Ga. 

80. Miller, Miss Florence G Asheville, N. C. 

81. Mitchell, Miss Elizabeth LaRue Mayslick, Ky. 

82. Mitchell, Mrs. Tabitha E. M Springfield, Mo. 

83. McClenaghan, Charles T Raleigh, N. C. 

84. McCowan, Robert J. F Bridgeton, N. J. 

85. Norris, Mrs. Leila S. (Life Member) Jersey City, N. J. 



18 '• TRANSACTIONS 

86. Pearmon, Mrs. Olive L Dallas, Texas. 

87. Pittman, Mrs. Julia M Buffalo, Mo. 

88. Popcnoe, Paul Washington, 1). C. 

89. Porcher, Miss Catherine C. P Mt. Pleasant, S. C. 

90. Porcher, Miss Edith Smith. Spartanburg, S. C. 

91. Porcher, Mrs. J. Faber Charleston, S. C. 

92. Porcher, Miss Margaret W Biltmore, N". C. 

93. PryoiyMrs. Francis Davis San Francisco, Calif. 

94. Pryor, Frank Davis, Jr San Francisco, Calif. 

95. Ratcliffe, Mrs. Jennings D Mouroeville, Ala. 

96. Ravenel, Jas. J., M.D ■ Charleston, S. C. 

97. Ravenel, Miss Susan S Aiken, S. C. 

98. Richardson, Miss Emma B Charleston, S. C. 

99. Richbourg, Miss Lucile : .Itta Bena, Miss. 

100. Richey, Francis H Asbury Park, N. J. 

101. RoBards, John Lewis Hannibal, Mo. 

102. Robert, Wm. Pierre Washington, D. C. 

103. Roosevelt, Nicholas G Philadelphia, Pa. 

104. Sevier, Robert M.D Richmond, Mo. 

105. Sinkler, Hugcr Charleston, S. C. 

106. Smith, Miss Ellen Halsey Wilmington, Ohio. 

107. Speight, Mrs. J. R ". Norfolk, Va. 

108. Stoney, Miss Anna M Charleston, S. C. 

109. Stoney, Gaillard San Francisco, Calif. 

110. Sturgeon, Mrs. Harriet M Puftalo, Mo. 

111. Tedcastle, Mrs. Arthur W Milton, Mass. 

112. Tiedeman, Mrs. J. O. C Charleston, S. C. 

1 13. Thomas, Miss Georgia A Charleston, S. C. 

1 14. Thomas, Miss Lillie P. • Charleston, S. C. 

115. Trabue, Miss Ellen Shawhan, Ky. 

116. Van Cleftj Mrs. Kalherine B.. Scran ton, Pa. 

117. Walker, Miss Alice A '. Winnsboro, S. C. 

1 18. Walks, Miss Kate: Charleston, S. C. 

1 1<). Waties, Miss Kalherine C Columbia, S. C. 

120. Watkius, Mrs. S. S Owensboro, Ky. 

121. Wayne, Arthur T Mt. Pleasant, S. C. 

122. Wayne, Mrs. Arthur T Mt. Pleasant, S. C. 

123. Welch, Mrs. Thomas Cooper Charleston, S. C. 

124. Whitaker, Miss Elizabeth Louisiana, Mo. 

125. Wilkinson, Mrs. Julia C Shelbyville, Ky. 

126. Wood, Mrs. Alfred V Brunswick, Ga. 

127. Woodson, Thomas Dupuy, U. S. Army Corozal, Canal Zone. 

128. Woolworth, Mrs. Gilbert S Watertown, N. V. 

The six (6) applicants for membership, favorably reported 
and elected at the Special Meeting of May 22, 1916 (Trans- 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA L9 

actions No. 22, 1916, page 17), together with the above named 
one hundred and twenty eight (128) applicants (favorably 
reported), bring the total number of applicants (favorably 
reported) up to one hundred and thirty-four (134) during the 
year beginning April 13, 1916. 

Gifts of books have been made to the Society by Miss Tsabelle 
deSaussure, of Charleston, S. C, and Mrs. Harmon Miller, 
of Asheville, N. C, and by Dr. Ashley Scovel of Yonkers, N. Y., 
from the Library of the late Rev. Charles S. Vedder, D.D., 
LL.D. The necessity for a place, where the Society's growing 
and valuable Library can be properly stored and kept, is again 
earnestly urged upon the Society by the Executive" Com- 
mittee. 

The Executive Committee should be authorized to mark such 
of the sites of the old and extinct French Protestant or Huguenot 
Churches or Houses of Worship, in the seven original Huguenot 
centres or settlements in South Carolina, as have not been 
already marked — those in the "Charleston" and "Goose Creek" 
centres or settlements. being the two already marked. 

The attention of the Society is earnestly directed to the ad- 
visability and desirability of re-publishing in the Transactions 
of the Society the very admirable genealogical sketch of the 
Marion family by the late Hon. Richard Yeadon. 

The clerical duties and work of the Secretary and Treasurer 
have become so great and onerous by reason ol the large in- 
crease in membership and of the mass of detail necessitated by 
the publication and issuing and mailing of the Transactions, 
and so forth, that, in the opinion of the Executive Committee, 
an assistant or a clerk will have to be employed. 

Section 2 of the By-Laws has been amended by a vote of a 
majority of all the members of the Executive Committee at a 
meeting held on January 12, 191 7, during the recess of the Society, 
by adding thereto a clause reading "And three (3) shall con- 
stitute a quorum of the Executive Committee;" Provided, the 
same be confirmed at this (the next) meeting of the Society — 
as required by Section 8 of the By-Laws. 



20 TRANSACTIONS 

The Executive Committee recommends adoption by the 
Society of the following resolutions: 

1. Resolved, That the Executive Committee be authorized 
and empowered to mark with suitable monuments, as soon as 
practicable, the sites of the old and extinct French Protestant 
or Huguenot Churches or Houses of Worship in the following 
five (5) of the seven (7) original Huguenot centres or settle- 
ments in 'South Carolina, to wit: (1) "Orange Quarter (St. 
Denis)," (2) "French Santee," (3) "St. John's, Berkley/' 
(4) "Purysburg," and (5) "New Bordeaux." 

2. Resolved, That the re-publication in the Transactions of 
this Society of the late Hon. Richard Yeadon's very admirable 
genealogical sketch of the Marion family, with an addendum 
continuing it down to the present time, be and hereby is author- 
ized and directed, as soon as it may be possible. 

3. Resolved, That the Secretary and Treasurer be authorized to 
employ the services of an assistant or a clerk at a salary not 
exceeding twenty-five dollars per month, and that such salary 
be paid out of the Society's treasury. 

4. Resolved, That the Executive Committee's amendment on 
January 12, 1917, of Section 2 of the By-Laws, by adding 
thereto a clause reading "And three (3) shall constitute a quorum 
of the Executive Committee," be and the same is hereby con- 
finned. 

T. W. Bacot, President, 
April 13, 1917. Chairman of Executive Committee. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 21 

ANNUAL ACCOUNT 

of 

Daniel Ravenel, Treasurer, for the year ending April 13, 1917. 

, Receipts 
1916 
April 14 

To balance from last year $558.77 

To dues of members, April 14, 1916-April 13, 1917 638.45 

To sale of Transactions 13.03 

To sale of badges 68.95 

To interest on permanent fund 20.06 



$1299.26 
Disbursements 
1917 
April 14 

By Expense of meeting $23 . 20 

By collations at meetings 50 . 00 

By printing and stationery 172.92 

By badges purchased 56 . 80 

By postage, telegrams and express 113 .00 

By stenographic work 92 .25 

By President's dues to Huguenot's Society to London 5.30 

By books purchased 6.61 

By refund of dues paid by mistake 5 .00 

By check returned, not paid 3 . 50 

By contribution for the blind in France 5 .00 

By exchange on checks .95 

By commission paid to Treasurer on $740.49 collected 74.04 



Permanent Fund $614.21 

General Fund 76.48 

$690.69 



$608.57 

690.69 
$1299 26 



22 TRANSACTIONS 

REPORT OF THE HISTORIAN 
From April 13, 1916, to April 13, 1917 

Transactions Nos. 7 and 9. Presented by Colonel Alex. R. Lawton. 

The Missouri Historical Review, April, July, October, 1916. 

The Pennsylvania Magazine, April, 1916, July, October, January, April. 

Four Publications of Societe de l'Histoire, Protestantisme Francais. 

The North Carolina Historical Society, Sprunt Historical Publications. 

South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine, January, April, July, 
October, January. 

Kungl Vitterhets Historie Och Antikvtetsakademien, Stockholm 15. 

The Royal Colonial Institute Magazine, March, April, May, June, July, August, 
September, October, November, December, January. 

Notes Concerning the Family of Larpent, Fredric DeH. Larpent. 

Yale University Press. A List of Newspapers in the Yale University Library. 

Historical Society of Wisconsin. Proceedings, 1915. 

A Tale of the Huguenots, by F. L. Hawks, D.D. 

Memorial of Colonel David DuBose Gaillard from the Third U. S. Volunteer 
Engineers. 

The Pomeroy Pamphlet, A. A. Pomeroy. 

Classification, Universal and Old World History, Library of Congress. 

The Washington Historical Quarterly, July, October, 1916, January. 

The Annals 1916, Georgia Historical Society. 

Address by Hon. James M. Beck, before The Pilgrims of Great Britain. 

General Catalogue, Bowdoin College. 

Register of the French Church of Threadneedle Street, London, vol. 4, Huguenot 
Society of London. 

By-laws and list of Fellows 1916, Huguenot Society of London. 

Life Work of John L. Girardeau, D.D., LL.D., from Mrs. Annie Girardeau Black- 
burn. 

Memorials of the Huguenots in America, by the Rev. A. Stapletori. 

"Lafayette Day 1916," American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society. 

Record of the Town of New Rochelle, 1099-1828, Jeanne A. Forbes. 

Proceedings of the New York State Historical Association, Vol. XIV. 

The Huguenots, 2 Volumes, bought by the Society. 

Indiana Magazine of History, December, 1916. 

Report of the Librarian of Congress, 1916. 

Huguenot Society of America, List of members, January 1, 1917. 

Transactions No. 19, Mrs. Harmon Miller. 

Proceedings of the Huguenot Society of London, Vol. XI, No. 2. 

D'Aubignc's History of the Reformation, 5 Vols.; F'or Faith and Freedom; and 
Gaspard de Coligny. Presented by Mrs. Harmon Miller, Asheville, N. C. 

The Georgia Historical Quarterly, Georgia Historical Society. 

Liturgie L'Fglise Protestante Francaise, Huguenot Church, Charleston. 

Brock's Emigration to Virginia. Purchased. 

The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. Purchased. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 23 

In addition to the above list of books and publications received 
during the past year the Society has received from Mis^ Isabel Ie 
deSaussure valuable books from the library of her father, the 
late Gen. Wilmot G. deSaussure. 

Dr. Ashley Scovel, of Yonkers, N. Y., has presented the 
Society with a large number of books and pamphlets from the 
library of his uncle, the late Dr. Chas. S. Vedder. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. G. Mazyck, Historian. 

April 13, 1917. 



24 TRANSACTIONS 

ADDRESS OF COL. II. A. du PONT BEFORE THE 
HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AT ITS 
ANNUAL MEETING AT CHARLESTON, S. C, APRIL 

13, 1917. 

Mr. President and fellow-members of the Huguenot Society of 
South Carolina, Ladies and Gentlemen: 

While the "Transactions" of our Society give us the official 
details of its organization and subsequent progress, its inception 
and continuance must be ascribed, in the last analysis, to a 
certain innate sentiment which impels most of us to take an 
interest in all that concerns our forefathers, and this is especially 
the case when those whose names we bear and whom we may 
be said to represent, were men of the piety, integrity and high 
character of our Huguenot ancestors. Their entire history 
shows that they were not merely individuals of blameless lives 
and kindly dispositions, but that they were al^o men of special 
courage and capacity, who, far from believing in "peace at 
any price," were willing and able to light for their religious 
rights as well as to make any sacrifice of worldly advantage or 
of material things in order to attain them. 

During the thirty-two years of the Wars of Religion, the 
Huguenots were valiant soldiers in the field; and though the 
changed conditions of a later era precluded an appeal to arms 
at the time of the Revocation, nearly two-thirds of them fled 
from their native country to escape persecution, hi spite of the 
desperate efforts made to prevent their departure, while those 
who remained voluntarily exposed themselves to greatly in- 
creased oppression and suffering rather than abandon the land 
of their birth, and stubbornly resisted all attempts to compel 
them to forego their religious convictions. 

Huguenot history may be divided into four periods, which 
I shall discuss successively: — 1st. From the Reformation to 
the beginning of the Wars of Religion in 1562. 2nd. From 
1562 to the promulgation of the Edict of Nantes in 1598. 3rd. 
From 1598 to the Revocation of this Edict in 1685. 4th. From 



r 



' 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 25 



the Revocation to the promulgation of the Edict of Toleration 

in 1787. 

The first period begins with the extraordinary religious 
upheaval known as the Reformation, which was of slow and 
gradual development and extended over a considerable term 
of years. Originating in the early part of the sixteenth century, 
this great spiritual movement steadily progressed until its 
largest proportions were reached, in France at least, between 
1555 and 1560. During the first years of the Reformation, 
those who severed their connection with the Roman Catholic 
Church were persecuted most cruelly; many were burned alive, 
hanged or beheaded, and many more brutally whipped in public 
or cast into prison. In spite of all these barbarities, the seceders 
from the established church became so numerous that the 
Catholics found it impossible to stem the tide, and, in defiance 
of the authorities, thousands of those who protested against 
the abuses which obtained in the Catholic church held their 
religious exercises in the open air. These "protestants," who 
were originally called "Calvinists" because they followed the 
teachings of Calvin, were not long in founding a national reli- 
gious organization styled the " Reformed Churches of France," 
which was followed by the establishment of Protestant con- 
gregations all over the kingdom. The members of the Re- 
formed churches were better known, however, as "Huguenots," 
an appellation given them for the first time at Tours in 1560, 
its origin and significance still being involved in obscurity, 
although it has been a subject of discussion for more than three 
centuries. 

Upon the death of Francis II in December, 1560, the whole 
kingdom of France was convulsed by the doctrines of the Ref- 
ormation, which gave rise to religious controversies of extreme 
violence, provoked the most vehement disputes and engendered 
the bitterest animosities. Families were divided against them- 
selves, parents and children, brothers and sisters, frequently 
taking opposite sides and often severing their personal relations. 
So intense was the nervous strain and so passionate were the 



26 TRANSACTIONS 

feelings aroused, that bloodshed became inevitable, as the ques- 
tions at issue could be settled only by an appeal to arms. 

Early in 1562, the second period of French Huguenot history, 
that of the Wars of Religion, was ushered in by sanguinary 
encounters between Catholics and Protestants at Amiens, 
Tours and other places, the most serious being the affray, or 
massacre, as it is usually called, at Vassy, in which forty-nine 
were killed .and some two hundred wounded, most of them 
Calvinists. 

The Wars of Religion, once begun, dragged their slow length 
along with varying fortunes for some thirty- two years, including 
several truces or armistices during which hostilities were sus- 
pended. It would extend unduly this address, were I to at- 
tempt to give even a short account of that protracted contest, 
and I shall not mention even its most important military epi- 
sodes beyond a reference to the memorable sieges of Rouen in 
1562 and of La Rochelle during the following year where the 
Catholics failed in their long continued efforts to make them- 
selves masters of that city. Rouen, however, was taken by 
assault after a desperate defense of many months in which the 
Huguenot women fought on the ramparts beside the men: the 
city was sacked and plundered, and greai numbers of Calvinists 
of all ages and both sexes put to the sword, among them two of 
my own ancestors. 

We now come to the third period of Huguenot history, com- 
mencing with the promulgation of the famous Edict of Xantes, 
April 13, 1598, under the terms of which the Calvinists were 
guaranteed, among other things, religious toleration, the right 
of holding public office and of maintaining one church in the 
immediate vicinity of each town or city, Raids excepted. The 
beneficent effects of this measure were evidenced by the general 
religious tranquillity which prevailed throughout France during 
the latter part of Henry IV's reign as well as during that of his 
successor, Louis XIII, who issued his Edict of Xismes confirm- 
ing in every particular that of Xantes. Similar conditions 
prevailed during the first years of the sovereignty of Henry's 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 27 

grandson, Louis XIV, whose important "Declaration" of May, 
1562, acknowledged in no uncertain terms the services of the 
Huguenots who had supported the crown during the revolts 
and disturbances which had characterized his minority, and, 
to quote his own words, who had "given signal proofs of their 
affection and fidelity": the manifesto further declared that it 
was his will "that they be kept and maintained in the full 
enjoyment of the Edict of Nantes," and "notably of the public 
exercise of their religion despite any and all decisions or decrees 
to the contrary, either of our council or of the courts." The 
Huguenots, on their side, entertained feelings of unbounded 
gratitude not only to Henry IV, the first sovereign of the House 
of Bourbon, but to his descendants as well, and their loyalty 
to the person of the sovereign was of a most extreme and pas- 
sionate nature. This sentiment, which had its origin in the 
Wars of Religion, was inculcated by the Reformed churches 
and fostered in every way by the Huguenot ministers, commonly 
called "pasteurs." 

When, however, the many uprisings and insurrections set 
on foot by the Catholic subjects of Louis XIV had been crushed 
and the power of the crown had become infinitely greater than 
had been the case for centuries, the services and active support 
of the Huguenots were no longer of importance. Taking ad- 
vantage of these new conditions, the Roman Catholic hierarchy, 
the religious orders and the more bigoted portion of the laity, 
began a campaign for the abrogation of the Edict of Nantes. 
A general assembly of the Catholic episcopate and clergy was 
held every five years in Paris to discuss matters relating to the 
church, and on these occasions it was customary to present an 
address to the monarch and to vote a handsome subsidy to the 
royal treasury, which the Catholic church could well afford in 
view of its ownership of nearly one-third of the real estate of 
the kingdom. In addressing the sovereign, the assembly of 
1655 made the following representations: "That while not 
demanding immediate abolition of religious liberty, because 
we do not believe that it would be easy to put this into effect, 



28 TRANSACTIONS 

we would hope at least that the evil be not allowed to make 
the slightest progress and, if the royal authority cannot cut it 
off at a. single blow, that it will do its utmost to enfeeble and 
destroy it little by little." Although no official action was taken 
in response to the above demand, it is probable that private 
assurances were given; at all events, from that time forward 
the policy of the government strictly conformed to the clerical 
program just stated, and in furtherance thereof a long scries of 
royal decrees and "Declarations" gradually nullified and de- 
stroyed the religious and personal rights of the Huguenots, 
which had been guaranteed by Henry IV and his successors. 

The limits of these remarks will permit only a brief statement 
of the more important of these measures of persecution. In 
direct contravention of the Edict of Nantes, Protestants were 
declared ineligible for appointment to any public office, no 
matter how insignificant, were excluded from the bar, from the 
practice of medicine and from becoming booksellers or printers. 
If a Huguenot were seriously ill, it became the duty of a judge 
or other public official accompanied by two witnesses to intrude 
into the sick chamber to ascertain whether the sufferer desired 
the presence of the Catholic parish priest: when death ensued, 
funeral services could be held only during the very early morn- 
ing hours or after dark at night, and not more than thirty 
relatives and friends could attend. Except within a church 
edifice, no meetings were permitted for prayer, lor the reading 
of the Bible, or for any other religious purpose, under penalty of 
nine years banishment from the locality in which the meeting 
was held, of corporal punishment and of a fine of three thousand 
livres. Any Huguenot who had adjured his faith was prohibited 
from returning to the same under any pretext, this being deemed 
an act of "apostacy" and punished by banishment from the 
kingdom, confiscation of property and public penance, which 
last penalty consisted of an exposure for hours to the jeers of 
the multitude in some prominent place, torch in hand and rope 
about the waist, the victim's sole attire being a scanty shirt. 

So far as the Reformed church was concerned, one of the 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 29 

first steps of the government was to forbid any meetings of the 
National or Provincial Synods and Colloquies, although these 
bodies were recognized specifically by the Edict of Nantes; this 
was followed later by the practical abolition of the Consistories 
as well as by the confiscation of all Huguenot church property. 
The "pasteurs" of the Reformed church, as may be supposed, 
were the subjects of special restriction: they were prohibited 
from making any reference to the Roman Catholic religion ex- 
cept in the most respectful terms and from taking any other 
title than that of "Minister of the Pretended Reformed church;" 
were not permitted to preach anywhere except in their own 
churches or "temples," nor to make use of any clerical garment 
save an ordinary black coat, which was not to be worn outside 
of the house of worship. The "pasteurs" also were held respon- 
sible personally should any Catholic join the Huguenot church 
or attend any of its services under pain of public penance, 
confiscation of property, life banishment and the demolition of 
the sacred edifice, the extreme severity of these penalties being 
an indirect tribute, perhaps, to their powers of persuasion. Of 
all the measures of persecution, however, the worst was that of 
June 17, 1681, which authorized the. "conversion" of any Hugue- 
not child over seven years of age by forcibly taking it away 
from the parents and placing it in a Catholic institution, the 
family paying all the expenses: this decree contained the in- 
credible statement that children of those tender ages were 
"competent to decide for themselves in regard to such an impor- 
tant matter as their salvation." 

The practical result of all these iniquitous acts was to inaugu- 
rate an emigration of Huguenots to foreign parts, which began 
soon after the new policy of the government went into effect in 
1656. Although comparatively insignificant at first, the de- 
parture became more and more appreciable as time went on 
and it is believed that some 250,000 Protestants left France 
previous to the Revocation, the fugitives becoming much more 
numerous after the issuance of the abominable Edict in regard 
to the kidnapping of children. Every effort was made to pre- 



30 TRANSACTIONS 

vent the flight of the Huguenots: as early as 1669 all French 
subjects were forbidden to leave the kingdom and take up their 
residence in foreign parts under penalty of death, confiscation 
of property and permanent loss of nationality, the decree being 
general in its terms, as the government was unwilling to admit 
that its measures of persecution were causing an exodus of 
French Protestants. A later decree, which appeared in 1682, 
was more specific, as it referred to the Huguenots as "those in 
error who have been leaving the country in utter disregard of 
the salvation of their souls, of their true personal interests and 
of the loyalty which they owe to their sovereign." This last 
manifesto changed the death penalty, so far as heads of fami- 
lies were concerned, to confinement in the galleys for life, and 
directed the imposition of heavy lines upon all those who assisted 
"those in error" to escape. A third decree issued a few months 
later nullified all transfers of real estate made by the persecuted 
Huguenots within a year previous to their flight, and openly 
stated that this was done "to prevent the departure to foreign 
countries of our subjects who belong to the Pretended Reformed 
religion." 

The destruction of the religious liberty of the Huguenots 
having been achieved by the measures just mentioned, a for- 
mal announcement of the fact was not long delayed. On the 
18th of October, 1685, Louis XIV affixed his signature to the 
Fdict of Revocation, which declared null and void the Fdict 
of Nantes as well as all, subsequent confirmations of the same. 
Under the terms of this wicked and insensate measure, fraught 
with so much evil and disaster to the French nation, all Hugue- 
not churches were demolished, all religious meetings forbidden, 
all Protestant schools closed and all ministers of the Reformed 
church ordered to leave the country within a fortnight. The 
penalties for apostacy and for expatriation were re-confirmed 
and it was specified that all Huguenot children were to be brought 
up as Catholics. 

This calamitous document, which inaugurated the fourth 
and last period of Huguenot history, terminated with the 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 31 

absolutely false assurance that "our subjects of the Pretended 
Reformed religion are permitted, until it shall please God to 
enlighten them, to reside in any and all parts of our kingdom, 
pursue their avocations and possess their property without 
being restrained or troubled on account of the said Pretended 
Reformed religion, upon the condition, now stated, that they 
do not take part in its services nor meet together for prayer 
or other religious purpose of any nature whatsoever." Not- 
withstanding this statement, no doubt intended to give the 
government some standing in the eyes of the rest of Europe, 
troops were already under orders in many parts of France to 
participate in the forcible conversion of the Protestants. The 
method employed was very simple: the heads of the Huguenot 
families were called together and notified that unless acts of 
abjuration were signed within a brief period (in Rouen they 
were given only two hours), troops would be quartered in their 
homes. As at first no signatures could be had, the soldiers 
forced their way into the Huguenot domiciles and proceeded 
to take possession, everything being permitted save rape and 
murder: they were encouraged to waste provisions, destroy 
furniture and appropriate personal belongings, as well as to 
insult, annoy and even torture at will the unhappy inmates. 
Resistance meant imprisonment, confiscation of property and 
permanent separation of parents and children by the confine- 
ment of the latter in Catholic institutions. So great were the 
horrors of (his diabolical form of persecution and so acute the 
sufferings involved, that acts of abjuration were signed by 
practically all the members of the Reformed churches, including 
those who fled the country later. 

The use of troops as just described, was called a "dragonnade," 
because the first soldiers so employed were dragoons (dragoiis 
in French), and I in ay quote in this connection the words of a 
Catholic prelate, the saintly Fenelon, who remarked that "it 
would be as easy for the King, by this method, to convert his 
subjects to Mohammedanism as to Catholicism." 

As an immediate result of the Revocation, a large majority 



32 TRANSACTIONS 

of the Huguenots made frantic efforts to leave the country, 
which, however, was no easy matter, as the frontiers and sea- 
coasts were closely watched. While great numbers died of the 
fatigue and exposure incident to their flight or were killed by 
the armed guards, and while still greater numbers were put in 
prison, the departing Protestants were in such multitudes that 
the immense majority could not be prevented from escaping, 
although many were compelled to undergo much privation and 
suffering. 

It must not be supposed, however, that all of the Huguenots 
were of the same mind: hundreds of thousands of them refused 
at any cost either to abandon the land of their birth or to give 
up their Protestant faith. Although they had become nominal 
Catholics by virtue of their abjuration under duress and were 
styled by the authorities "religionnaircs," or "new Catholics," 
they never wavered for a moment and absolutely declined to 
perform any of the religious duties of the Catholic church or to 
attend its services, but maintained their Protestant faith by 
family prayers and secret exhortations in the seclusion of their 
homes. 

While the Huguenots who had emigrated were in full enjoy- 
ment of religious freedom, as well as of the protection afforded 
them by the laws of the countries in which they had taken 
refuge, their brethren who remained in Prance were subjected 
not only to all the former methods of persecution, but also to 
new and cruel expedients which were devised to harass them 
still further. I shall endeavor in a few words to give some idea 
of their deplorable situation, as in this enlightened age it is 
difficult to realize fully the frightful conditions which then 
obtained. 

If a Protestant child were taken to the Catholic church for 
baptism, the priest performed the ceremony and then entered 
in the records that the infant just christened was the "bastard 

son (or daughter) of — and his concubine," which meant 

that the parents had been married by a Huguenot "pasteur" 
and not by a Catholic priest. Needless to say, after a few such 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 33 

experiences no Huguenot child was presented for baptism in the 
Catholic churches, except, perhaps, in some of the larger cities 
where the clergy were not so intolerant. If a Huguenot couple 
wished to marry, the priest would not officiate until they had 
made confession, taken the communion and undergone a re- 
ligious probation not required of Catholics, its length depending 
upon the will of the bishop and being prolonged sometimes for 
years. During fatal illness any ecclesiastic could force his way 
into the house to demand that the patient take the last sacra- 
ments of the Catholic church, and if these were refused or the 
sufferer expressed his intention of dying in the faith of the Re- 
formed church, appeal could be made, as soon as life was extinct, 
to the shocking Edict of April 29, 1686, which provided that 
"legal proceedings should be instituted against their corpses" 
and a sentence pronounced directing that Christian burial 
should be denied, that the lifeless body, in a state of nudity, 
should be exposed on a sled to the desecrations of the mob and 
then dragged to the place called a "voirie" where dead animals 
and other offal were thrown. Even when there was no inter- 
ference with the remains, the interment of Protestants Was not 
permitted in any Catholic church or cemetery, and their burials 
took place at night in some unfrequented place with no other 
ceremony than the prayers of a few relatives or friends. Another 
novel form of persecution was the practical denial of medical 
attendance to the unhappy Protestants under the provisions of a 
"Declaration" which forbade the physician or surgeon to make 
any further visits if at his second call he was not furnished with a 
certificate showing that the patient had made confession. 

Perhaps the hardest thing, however, which the non-emigrat- 
ing Huguenots had to endure, was the systematic abduction of 
their children under the provisions of the monstrous Edict of 
1681, to which I have alluded previously and which was enforced 
with much greater frequency after the Revocation. The homes 
of the Huguenots were surrounded at night by policemen, often 
headed by priests, who deliberately broke into the houses and 
carried off the screaming children despite the tears and pro- 



34 TRANSACTIONS 

testations of their parents. For more than two generations the 
possible seizure of their offspring haunted like an evil spectre 
every French Protestant household in which young children 
dwelt! 

One of the most striking features of this epoch of Huguenot 
history was the admirable courage and devotion of many Hugue- 
not ministers and lay preachers who, taking their lives in their 
hands, traveled in disguise throughout France and officiated at 
secret meetings held in woods, quarries and out-of-the-way 
places. Although most of these brave ministers perished on the 
scaffold and many of the worshippers were seized and sent to 
the galleys for life, the movement went on and could not be 
suppressed. 

As it was impossible for any self-respecting, conscientious 
French Protestant to marry or to have his children baptised 
in a legal way, these ceremonies were performed in secret (au 
desert) by their own ministers who attended to the spiritual 
wants of the faithful; and as time went on more than a million 
of French Huguenots had no civil status under the laws of their 
country. In February, 1785, Lafayette wrote to Washington 
as follows: "The French Protestants are the victims of an in- 
tolerable despotism: although for the moment not openly 
persecuted, their marriages are not legal: their wills are null in 
the eyes of the law: their children are considered as bastards 
and (heir persons as subjects for the gallows." In October oi 
the following year, the Baron de Breteuil, one of the ministers of 
Louis XVI and a Catholic by religion, made his celebrated 
report on the terrible condition of the Huguenots, in which he 
did not hesitate to say that the title alone of the last decree of 
Louis XtV, dated March 8, 1715, "was enough to make one 
shudder.' ' Although his prime minister was a Catholic arch- 
bishop, Louis XVI, infinitely to his credit, issued his Edict of 
Toleration in November, 1787, in spite of the determined opposi- 
tion of many influential court people and members of parlia- 
ment, as well as of the whole Catholic hierarchy with a few 
honorable exceptions. Under the terms of this Edict, French 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 35 

Protestants were permitted to exercise freely any profession or 
trade, to contract legal marriages before the civil authorities 
and to rehabilitate legally the secret matrimonial unions and 
baptisms of the past, to register the births of their children, and 
to enjoy the right of Christian burial in their own cemeteries 
and at such hours as they deemed proper. Thus Louis XVI, 
at a single blow, put an end to the infamous and atrocious 
system under which the non-emigrating Huguenots and their 
descendants had been persecuted so bitterly and so unrelent- 
ingly for over one hundred and one years. He also announced 
his intention of restoring the confiscated property and of extend- 
ing other measures of relief, but the outbreak of the Revolution 
precluded further action. 

While, as Lafayette said, the French Protestants were "the 
victims of an intolerable despotism, " I cannot emphasize too 
strongly the fact that they never yielded, nor ever for one 
instant thought of yielding, and that from father to son for three 
generations they resisted religious persecution with undaunted 
spirit and inflexible determination, until at last the long, hard 
contest was decided in their favor. Where in the pages of 
history can we find a braver and a more persistent resistance to 
oppression, or a people more strongly animated by the love of 
their country and the fear of their God? With this in mind, 
it is difficult to understand the action of the Huguenot Society 
of America in denying to the posterity of these heroic and long- 
suffering brother Huguenots admission to its membership. 
Under the constitution of that Society, as originally adopted in 
May, 1883, the representatives of French families, whose pro- 
fession of Protestant faith was anterior to the Edict of Tolera- 
tion, were eligible for membership; but when the constitution 
was amended, April 13, 1908, this provision was eliminated, 
thus excluding the descendants of the non-emigrating Hugue- 
nots who for more than a century had fought to the finish the 
great battle of religious freedom. 

Let me now call your attention to the spirit of toleration which 
was a special characteristic of our Huguenot ancestors: while 



36 TRANSACTIONS 

most tenacious of their own religious views, they were willing 
always that others should have the same privilege. Should 
we not then — if for no other reason than as a tribute to those 
who have gone before us — strive to cultivate a spirit of broad 
liberality and forbearance in matters of religion? 

Will you permit me to say, in conclusion, that perhaps my 
many times removed great-uncle, Abraham du Pont, the first 
of our family in South Carolina, was not very far wrong when, 
on the 13th of March, 1713, from his plantation in St. James 
Parish, Goose Creek, he wrote as follows to his brother in Rouen, 
"Nous apprenons qu'on ne vous laisse pas en repos et qu'on 
renouvelle de temps a autre quelque moyen de chagrin. II 
faut avouer que cet esprit de persecution, si eloigne des veritables 
principes du christianisme, est semblable a son auteur qui 
n'est jamais en repos et ne saurait laisser les hommes tranquilles. 
Le bon Dieu vous console et mette fin a nos maux et veuille 
pardonner a nos ennemis." 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 37 

ORANGE QUARTER (ST. DENIS) 

Written by Thomas W. Bacot 

Of the seven (7) original Huguenot centres or settlements in 
the State of South Carolina 1 (the British Province of Carolina 
as it was at the time of such settlements), the one, called "Orange 
Quarter (St. De%i$)" or' TheFrenchQuarter" as it was also called, 
which is the subject of this sketch, was located in that part of 
the original County of Berkley, bounded south-westwardly by 
the Cooper River and north- westwardly by the Eastern Branch 
of the Cooper River and north-eastwardly by the old Craven 
County line and later St. James', Santee, Parish line and south- 
eastwardly by the Wando River, etc., which part of the original 
County of Berkley afterwards constituted the Parish of St. 
Thomas and St. Denis and which (as a subdivision or tax dis- 
trict or town-ship of the present County of Berkley) still bears 
that name — it lay on and about the Creek known as "French 
Quarter Creek" (corrupted by negroes into Fresh Water Creek), 
formerly bearing the name of Lynch's Creek and originally the 
Indian name of Wisbqo or Wisbooe or Wishboo, which creek 
branches off from the south-eastern side of the Eastern Branch 
of the Cooper River (between Hagau and Cherry Hill planta- 
tions) and extends inwardly in a south-easterly direction towards 
the Wando River and Christ Church Parish line. 2 

Who and when were its rirs.t French settlers is a disputed ques- 
tion—Mr. Langdon Cheves and others being of the opinion that 
they were the French Protestant or Huguenot refugees who were 
sent hither by King Charles II in 1680 aboard the Ship of War 

1 Vide By-Laws, Section 7, of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, at page 
67 post. Also Transactions, No. 20, 1914, pages 22-3, and Transactions, No. 11, 
1904, pages 16-8. 

2 Vide the very elaborate and interesting and valuable article (with plat at- 
tached) by the Hon. H. A. M. Smith on "Quenby and the Eastern Branch of 
Cooper River" in the South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Vol. 
XVIII, No. I, January, 1917 — this article being number XVI of a series of very 
elaborate and interesting and valuable articles on "The Baronies of South Caro- 
lina" by him, appearing from time to time in the said Magazine. 



38 TRANSACTIONS 

Richmond? while Hon. H. A. M. Smith is of a different 
opinion. 4 

The writer of this sketch fails to see where fin the communi- 
cation of March 6, 1679, from the Lords Proprietors to the 
Board of Lords of Trade and Plantations, regarding the trans- 
porting of French Protestant families to Carolina; "the coming 
of these 'foreigners' to Carolina is spoken of as the first occasion 
of the kind'] as Judge Smith asserts in the latter of his said two 
articles. Nor can the writer accept Judge Smith's inference, 
that the forty-five French immigrants, who came in 1680 in the 
ship Richmond, ''were the first French to arrive in the colony" — 
it may be that they were the first body of French Protestants 
or Huguenots to be sent to Carolina by the King of England, 
but it does not follow that they were the first French Protes- 
tants or Huguenots to come to Carolina. It is true that the 
bulk of the French Protestant or Huguenot immigrations to 
Carolina was after the Revocation by Louis XIV of the Edict of 
Nantz on the 22nd of October, 1685, when their persecutions 
and unrest reached the climax — but their persecutions and unrest 
ante-dated that fateful and fatuous event and caused previous 
emigrations from time to time, notably as early as 1562 when 
Ribault's colony was planted at Port Royal in Carolina, short- 
lived though it was. It is not improbable that there were a 
few French Protestants or Huguenots in William Sayle's body 
of colonists of 1670, for, among other names of such colonists, 
are recorded those of Tho. Gourden (Gourdin?) and George 
Prideaux or Prideox or Prideux — also, as early as 1672 and 1678 
grants of land by the Lords Proprietors were made to one 
Prideaux and one Gilliard (Gaillard) and one Bodit 5 and others — 
and so it may well be that others came to Carolina between 
1670 and 1680. 



3 Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 5, 1897 (1898) 
page 63, footnote. 

4 Vide Judge Smith's other very elaborate and interesting and valuable article 
on "The Orange Quarter and the First French Settlers in South Carolina" in the 
South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Vol. XVIII, No. 3, July, 1917. 

'Salley's Warrants for Lands in South Carolina— 1672-79. 






HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 39 

And here it must be observed, that, though the number of 
French Protestants or Huguenots in the Province of Carolina 
was relatively small as Judge Smith takes pains to show in his 
said article on "The Orange Quarter and the First French 
Settlers in South Carolina," yet "not numbers but fruits" count — 
numbers are not necessarily a criterion of ascendancy or influence 
or success — "a little one shall become a thousand, and a small one 
a strong nation" (the "grain of mustard seed") — "the race is 
not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong" — and "a little leaven 
leaveneth the whole lump." In spite of antipathies and jeal- 
ousies and prejudices and even of political burdens and oppres- 
sions and wrongs on the part of other colonists, the French 
Protestants or Huguenots in Carolina moved onward and up- 
ward, their persistent faith and works inducing and exacting 
public and official recognition of and tribute to their genius 
and worth by the passage of the two Acts of March 10, 1696-7, 
and November 4, 1704, "for the making aliens free of this part 
of the Province." 6 And in two important Acts, relating to 
the finances of the Province, (the one of August 28, 1701, and 
the other of May 8, 1703), several Fluguenots, along with other 
persons, were appointed "Assessors" and "Commissioners" 7 — 
in numerous other Acts also are they honorably mentioned. 

Their impress needs not the hands and chisel and mallet of 
an " Old Mortality " to be deciphered. By them the whole region, 
of which the present State of South Carolina is a part, was 
first (1562) christened with her name " Carolina V in honor of 
Charles IX of France, as is stated at page 48 of "The History 
of South Carolina under the Proprietary Government 1670-1719" 
by Edward McCrady — no authority, however, for this statement 
is given— they did give the name to a Fort (Arx Carolina), but 
certain it is that the Province of Carolina was so called later 
by the English. {Ibid., p. 50). Also they named the fine 
estuary in the present County of Beaufort ''Port Royal" — and, 
too, they gave names to four counties, viz. Abbeville, Horry, 

* Statutes of South Carolina, Vol. II, pages 131 and 251, 
1 1bid., pages 182 and 206. 



40 TRANSACTIONS 

Laurens, Marion, and to many other and smaller municipalities 
and subdivisions (rural as well as urban), and to streets in the 
City of Charleston and elsewhere, and to streams and waters, 
el cetera. Their influence in war and in peace, in the army and the 
navy, in the liberal professions, in politics, in letters and science, 
in industrial arts, in agriculture, in commerce, and otherwise, 
has been pre-eminent and remarkable, not in South Carolina 
alone, but in the country at large as well. Huguenot blood 
flows in the veins of a multitude. Verily, English Cavaliers and 
French Chevaliers have united in the production of new genera- 
tions of fine men and women — the resultant of two worthy 
antecedents. 

Various records 8 indicate the following French Protestant or 
Huguenot family names of this Quarter and its vicinity: — 

Aunant, Belin, Besselleu, Bochel, Boisseau, Bonneau, Bossard, 
Bourdin, Boyneau, Brabant, Brcmar, Broun (/), Cahusac or 
Cusack{?), Caretonau,Carriere,Carteau, Chovin, Combe, Cordes, de 
Bordeaux, Dellay, de la Motte, de Longucmare, de St. Julien de 
Malacar, DeVeaux, Dubois, Duletle, Dupre, Durand or Durant, 
Dutarque, Dutartre or Dutart, Foure, Gabeau, Guerin, Horry, 
Huger, Jaudon, Joly, Juin, La or Le Bruce, Lachicotte, La or 
Le Coulier, La or Le Pierre, Lapotre, Laurens, La Roche, Legare, 
Le Jau or Le Jean, Le Roux, Lescsne, Manigault, Marbeuff or 
Marbojuf, Marion, Micheau, Monicr, Morquereau, M or rain, 
Mouzon, Maze,, Ncujville, Norman or Normand, Peyre, Per- 
driau, Peronneau, Pctineau, Poinsett, Poitevin, Poyas, Prio- 
leau, Puny, Ravencl, Rembert, Roulain, St. Martin, Sail ens, 
Saraziu, Savige, Savineau, Serre, Simons, Soulege, Syer, T is sot, 
Torquel, Tousiger, T rapier, Trezevant, Trouchet, Trouillard or 
Trouillarl, Varine or Verine or Verone, Videau, and others. 

8 The records in the oflice of the Register of Mesne Conveyances and in the 
office of the Probate Judge for Charleston County; Tomb-stones in St. Thomas' 
parish Church Yard and in Pompion Hill Chapel Yard; Annals and Registers of 
St. Thomas' and St. Denis' Parish, by Rev. Robert F. Clute, Rector — etc. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 41 

THE FRENCH PROTESTANT OR HUGUENOT CONGREGATION 

Caesar Moze's last will and testament (in French), which 
bears date 20th June, 1687, and which was proved within a 
month after its date, furnishes evidence of the fact that in the 
vicinity of the plantation, wherein he and " Nicolas Meran" 
(Nicholas Mayrant?) were "jointly interested, situated on the 
Eastern Branch of the 'T' on the Cooper River," there then 
existed in this Orange Quarter a settlement of French Protes- 
tants or Huguenots large enough to constitute a Congregation 
of the French Protestant Church and to justify the erection 
of a " temple or place of assemblage " (a church building or house 
of worship) for them. (A copy of the said will of Caesar Moze 
and a translation of it are hereto appended in full. 9 ) 

It has heretofore been erroneously stated by several writers 10 
that the bequest or legacy by Caesar Moze in his said will of 
"thirty seven pounds sterling" to the French Protestant Church 
in Carolina, "to be used in the construction of a temple or 
place of assemblage" in this Orange Quarter, was given to the 
French Protestant or Huguenot Church (Congregation) in Charles- 
ton, and that this goes to prove that a Congregation of the French 
Protestant Church was certainly in existence in Charleston in 
1687. Without discussing the vexed question of the date of 
the organization of the French Protestant or Huguenot Church 
(Congregation) of Charleston, such erroneous statements must 
now be corrected once for all by positive assertion of the fact 
that Caezar Moze by his said will did not give the said bequest 
or legacy to the French Protestant or Huguenot Church (Congre- 
gation) in Charleston, but he gave it to "The Church of the French 
Protestant Refugees in this country of Carolina, to be used in 
the construction of a temple or place of assemblage of (or for) 
the said Protestant Refugees, which shall be done at the place 
that will be found the most conveniently near to and in the 
vicinity of the said plantation" (the language of the will itself 
being " trente sept livres sterling que je donne a L'Eglise des 

9 See page 61 post. 

10 Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 5, 1897 (1898), 
page 13— and Transactions No. 7, 1900, pages 52-3 — etc. 



42 TRANSACTIONS 

Protestants jffrangois refugies en ce pays de la Caroline p r s'en 
servir a la construction d'un temple ou lieu d'assemblce des &•- Pro- 
testants Rejugies qui se /era an lieu qui sera trouve le plus con- 
venable proche & dans la voisinage de la d te plantation"). So 
the said French Protestant Church in Carolina as " an autono- 
mous and distinct body of Christians" (not the French Protestant 
or Huguenot Church of Charleston, which was " a congregation 
or a local unit" of the said French Protestant Church in Carolina 
as "an autonomous and distinct body of Christians" — see 
infra) was a Trustee, as it were, of the said fund of £37 "to 
be used in the construction of" such "temple or place of assem- 
blage" for the use and benefit and behoof of the said French 
Protestant Congregation of "Orange Quarter (St. Denis)." 

The French word Eglise is used in the said will to signify "an 
autonomous and distinct body of Christians, or a particular 
division of the whole (catholic or general or universal) corporate 
body of Christians possessing the same or similar symbols of 
doctrine and forms of worship and united by a common name 
and history and ecclesiastical government — a Christian com- 
munion, or denomination, or sect" — as for instances, the An- 
glican Church and the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
United States of America, the Greek Church, the Roman 
Church, the French Protestant Church, the Presbyterian 
Church, the Methodist Church, the Baptist Church, and others. 
(In Una plures and E pluribus Unum.) 

The literal meaning of the English word "Church" is "The 
Lord's house" — a derivative of the Greek "To Kupiaww," 
whence our "Kyrke" or "Kirk" and "Church." But the one 
English word "Church" has several different meanings, to wit: 
among others, (1) a building or edifice or temple dedicated to 
religious worship, or a place of religious assemblage, or a house 
of worship; (2) a congregation or a local unit of an autonomous 
and distinct body of certain religionists; (3) an autonomous 
and distinct body of certain religionists, or a particular division 
of the whole (catholic, or general, or universal) corporate body of 
certain religionists possessing the same or similar symbols of doc- 
trine and forms of worship and united by a common name and 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OP SOUTH CAROLINA 43 

history and ecclesiastical government; (4) the whole (catholic or 
general or universal) corporate body of certain religionists, e.g." the 
Christian Church/' and too "the Jewish Church." 11 

It seems that the French Protestant or Huguenot Congrega- 
tion of this Orange Quarter maintained their distinctive ecclesias- 
tical organization until the year 1706 A D., when (probably be- 
cause their means were inadequate to the support of a French 
ProtestantMimstev, and they were therefore desirous of conforming 
to or being incorporated or merged into the Church of England, 
which had the advantage of being the established Church of the 
Province of Carolina) they petitioned the Provincial Assembly 
that they be made a Parish and granted a public allowance for 
their Minister (who ordinarily would have to be an episcopally 
ordained Clergyman and who would have to use the liturgy of 
the Church of England), and that he should read such liturgy and 
preach to them in French. 12 Accordingly, they were " received 
into the fold;" and, by the Act of November 30, 1706, (com- 
monly called "the Church Act"), u a parish was created "in 
the Orange-quarter for the use of the French Settlement there, 
which shall be called by the name of the parish of S* Dennis/' M 
in addition to the five (5) other parishes (whereinto along with 
it Berkley County was divided, besides Charlestown which 
constituted S l Philip's Parish) — and one of the said five (5) other 
parishes was located "upon that neck of land lying on the 
North-west of Wandoe, and South-east of Cooper river, which 
shall be called by the name of S* Thomas." 16 Section XXII 
of the said Act further provides, as follows: 

11 Encyclopoedia Britannica, and The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia, and 
The Standard Dictionary of the English language — under the head "Church." 

12 Letters of the Rev. Thomas Hasell, Rector of St. Thomas Parish (written in 
1716), referred to in appendix No. IV to address of J. J. Pringle Smith, Esquire, 
at page 127 of pamphlet of the "Special Services held at St. Philip's Church, 
Charleston, S. C, in May, 1875, in commemoration of the planting of the Church 
of England in the Province of Carolina" — and also in Transactions of the Huguenot 
Society, No. 5, 1897 (1898), pages 64-5. Vide, too, Dakko's Church of South 
Carolina, page 288. 

13 Statutes of South Carolina, Vol. II, page 282. 

14 Ibid., (Section III,) page 283. 
16 Ibid., page 28 i. 



44 TRANSACTIONS 

"XXII. Whereas, the far greater part, if not all, of the inhabi- 
tants belonging to the parish of St. Dennis, in Orange Quarter, and 
also the inhabitants belonging to the parish of St. James, on 
Santee river, were born in the kingdom of Fiance, and have not the 
advantage to understand the English tongue, so as to receive any 
benefit or edification if the divine service, prayers and sermons were 
performed in the English tongue; Be it therefore enacted by the author- 
ity aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful for the rectors or minis- 
ters of the said parishes, during such time and as long as the major 
part of the inhabitants of the said parishes shall think fit and con- 
venient, to perform and read the common prayers, and to administer 
the sacraments, and to use all the other rites and ceremonies accord- 
ing to the use of the church of England, as also all other proper 
prayers and sermons in the French tongue, and no longer. Provided 
always, that they use the translation of the said book of common 
prayers, &c. which was translated into the said French tongue by 
Dr. John Durrell, by the express command and order of his late 
Majesty King Charles Second, for the use of. his Majesty's Chapel 
of the Savoy and his Islands of Jersey and Guernsey, and such other 
parts of his said Majesty's dominions as should want the same; 
which translation was, with the approbation of the Lord Bishop of 
London, by his said Majesty's order, ordered to be set forth, and no 
other." 16 

And, by Section XXIII of said Act, three French Protestants 
or Huguenots, viz. John Abraham Motte and Rene Ravenel 
and Philip Gendron, were nominated and appointed, along with 
other persons, to be the Commissioners mentioned in the Act. 17 

The previous Church Act of November 4, 1704, 18 (Section V), 
which was superseded by the above mentioned Act of November 
30, 1706, makes no mention of the Parish of S fc Denis — thus 
indicating that the French Protestants or Huguenots of this 
Orange Quarter had not then conformed to or been incorpo- 
rated or merged into the Church of England. 

The said Church Act of November 30, 1706, in Section III, 
described the general locations of the several parishes created 

16 Ibid., page 288. 

17 Ibid., page 288. 

18 Ibid., page 236. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 45 

and established by it, but did not particularly express their 
respective limits and bounds — so the subsequent additional Act 
of December 18, 1708, 19 (Section I) particularly expressed and 
defined such limits and bounds, and enacted that (among 
others) "the said parishes on the neck of land lying on the north- 
west of Wando and south-east of Cooper river, called S l . Thomas 
and S x . Dennis, shall be and is hereby bounded, to the north-east 
by the bounds of Craven county, to the south by the bounds of Christ 
Church parish and Wando river, to the west by Cooper river, to 
that tract of land commonly called the Uagin, inclusive, and to the 
north by the eastern branch of the said Cooper river, to the planta- 
tion of the Right Honourable Sir Natha?iiel Johnson, Knight, 
Governour, inclusive, and then by an east line from the norther most 
part of the said plantation to the bounds of Craven county." It 
will be observed that the name "S*. Thomas" and the name 
"S* Dennis" were therein combined, as if they constituted but 
one parish, though the said Church Act of November 30, 1706, 
had created and established the parish of S*. Thomas by itself 
and the parish of S l . Dennis by itself as distinct and separate 
parishes — and that, while the above quoted pail of Section I 
of the said Act of December 18, 1708, reads "the said parishes" 
(plural), &c, yet it goes on to read "shall be andw" (singular) 
"hereby bounded," &c. (no limits and bounds ever having been 
fixed for the parish of S x . Denis by itself as a distinct and 
separate parish). 

The said Act of September 18, 1708, would seem to contem- 
plate the parish of S*-. Denis as a distinct and separate parish 
(ecclesiastically, if not geographically and politically) only during 
the time that the divine service of the French congregation of 
the church of S fc . Denis should be in the French language, for 
Section II of that Act reads, as follows: 

"II. And Whereas by the above-mentioned limits and bounds 
of the several parishes of St. Thomas and St. Dennis, the said parish 
of St. Dennis is included in the said bounds, and it will be difficult 

"Ibid., page 328. 



46 TRANSACTIONS 

at present to fix the bounds of the said parish of St. Dennis, lying 
in the midst of the bounds, and designed at the present only for the 
use of the French Settlement, which at present are mixt with English; 
Be it therefore further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the 
French congregation of the Church of St. Dennis only, shall be liable 
to the charges and parochial duties belonging to the said church, 
during the time that the divine service of the said congregation be 
in the French language; and that for the future, when the service 
shall be perforrped in the English language, the said church of St. 
Dennis shall become a chappel of ease to the said parish church of 
St. Thomas." 

By the Act of May 29, 1736, 20 the Vestry-men of the one 
parish of S e . Thomas were incorporated — this being the only in- 
stance of the incorporation of the Vestry-men of a parish in the 
history of South Carolina as a British Province before the 
Revolution (the Rector or Minister of each and every parish of 
the Province having been incorporated as a corporation sole 
by the said Church Act of November 30, 1706) 21 — but by the 
Act of the Legislature of the State of South Carolina of March 
10, 1784, 22 the vestry and church wardens of the parish of S l . 
Thomas and S fc . Denis were incorporated under the name of 
" Vestry and Church Wardens of the parish of S*. Thomas and 
S fc . Dennis." whereby the quondam two distinct and separate 
parishes of SK Thomas and S*. Denis were evidently united into 
one parish, which has ever since continued to be the case. 

The said Church Act of November 30, 1700, had provided in 
Section XIV " that there shall be a rector or minister for each of 
the several parishes mentioned in this Act" and in Section XXVIII 
"that there be vestries in each parish of this Province" It also 
directed in Section XVIII that, three years after its ratifica- 
tion, "the said several rectors or ministers of the said several 
parishes, and their successors, shall each of them have and receive 
. . . . one hundred pounds per annum, current money of 

"Ibid., Vol. Ill, page 431. 

21 Ibid., Vol. II, (Section XV), page 286. 

22 Ibid., Vol. IV, page 583. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 47 

this Province, .... excepting the parish of St. Dennis 
for the French Settlement in Orange Quarter, the rector or minister 
of which parish shall be allowed but fifty pounds per annum, 
which shall be paid to him and his successors forever" — -but, by 
the subsequent Act of June 7, 1712, (Section XII), 23 it was 
directed "that, from and after the ratification of this Act, the 
present rector or minister of the said parish of S* Dennis, for the 
French Settlement in Orange Quarter, shall be allowed (as the 
other rectors or ministers are) the sum of one hundred pounds 
per annum, to be paid half yearly to him and his successors 
forever." 

It seems that the Rev d John La Pierre or Le Pierre was the 
quasi rector or minister of the said parish of S fc Denis, for the 
French Settlement in Orange Quarter, from and after Novem- 
ber 30, 1706, (when it was made a parish) to his death in 1728, 
notwithstanding the fact of his not being an episcopally ordained 
clergyman of the Church of England; and it is probable that, 
previous to its being made a parish, he had been the French 
Protestant minister or missionary to the French Protestant Con- 
gregation of the Orange Quarter, although Rev d Mr. Clute says 
that he was "Missionary S*. Denis 1711-1728" and also that 
"Rev. Mr. Prioleau and Rev. Dr. Le Jeau gave the French 
occasional services before the appointment of Rev. Mr. Le 
Pierre as Missionary." 21 How long he may have been the 
French Protestant minister or missionary to the said Congrega- 
tion prior to November o0, 1700, is not known. Dr. Dalcho 
states that he "was their only Minister," 25 i.e., French Protes- 
tant Minister — and Mr. Thomas Gaillard says that he "was 
the only minister of the Huguenot Church in the Orange Quar- 

23 Ibid., Vol. H, page 372. 

24 Annals and Registers of St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish, page 21. Also, vide 
"Historical Sketch of the Huguenot Congregations of South Carolina" by Mr. 
Daniel Ravenel, the grand-father of the present Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Huguenot Society of South Carolina, in Transactions Huguenot Society of South 
Carolina, No. 7, 1900, page 43— and Rev. Dr. Shipp's History of Methodism in 
South Carolina pages 31-5. 

25 Dalcho's Church of South Carolina, page 288. 



48 TRANSACTIONS 

ter whose name has been transmitted to us" 26 — and Mr. 
Daniel Ravenel says: "The Rev. Mr. Le Pierre was their 
Minister, but at what period I am unable to ascertain. Like 
the French at Santee, they maintained their own worship until 
after the passage of the Church Act of 1706, by which it was 
made the parish of St. Denis." 27 

The Rev. John James Tissot (himself a Huguenot, but who 
had become an episcopally ordained clergyman of the Church 
of England) was appointed to the parish of S fc Denis, for the 
French Settlement in Orange Quarter, by D r Gibson, Bishop 
of London, August 8, 1729, and arrived in 1730 28 — he continued 
to be Rector or Minister of the same from 1730 to his death in 
1763, and was the first and last Rector or Minister (episcopally 
ordained) of the same. 

The Act of June 13, 1747, 29 established the Chapel at Pom- 
piori Hill, in the parish of St. Thomas, as the parochial Chapel 
of Ease for the said parish of St. Thomas, and repealed the last 
part of Section II of the said Act of December 18, 1708, 30 in so 
far as it related to "the said church of St. Dennis" becoming 
"a chappel of ease to the said parish church of St. Thomas." 

Finally, the parish of St. Denis (as a distinct and separate 
parish) seems to have become discontinued or disestablished by 
the Act of April 12, 1768, 31 Section II of which reads, as follows: 

"II. And whereas, by the decease of the Rev. Mr. John Tisscott, 32 
late minister to the French congregation at Orange Quarters, in the 
parish of St. Thomas and St. Dennis, and by the death of the great- 
est part of the parishioners who understood the French language, 

26 Transactions Huguenvt Society of South Carolina, No. 5, 1897 (1898), page 65. 
But Dr. Baird, in his History of the Huguenot Emigration to America (Vol. II, 
p. 98), says that the Rev' 1 Laurent Philippe Trouillard was the first Pastor of 
Orange Quarter. 

27 Transactions Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 7, 1900, page 42. 

28 Dalcho's Church of South Carolina, page 289. 
28 Statutes of South Carolina, Vol. Ill, page 699. 

30 Ibid, Vol. II, page 328. 

31 Ibid, Vol. IX, page 225. 
M Tissot. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 49 

and also, by the establishing a Chapel of Ease at Pumkeon Hill, in 
the said parish, the performing of divine service in the French tongue 
is now unnecessary and disused, the French congregation being in- 
corporated with the rest of the parish, and the French Church be- 
coming useless for a place of worship. — And whereas, there are no 
church wardens or vestry of the said French congregation, or any 
other person authorized by law to take charge of the records and 
effects belonging to the said church. Be it therefore enacted by the 
authority aforesaid; That from and immediately after the passing of 
this Act, it shall and may be lawful for the church wardens and ves- 
try of the said parish of Saint Thomas and Saint Dennis, or their 
successors for the time being, or the majority of them, to sell and 
dispose of the lands belonging to the said French Church or congre- 
gation, and the buildings thereon, to any person or persons what- 
soever, at the best price that may be had for the same; and to execute 
good and sufficient conveyances thereof to the said purchaser or 
purchasers in fee simple; and also, that it shall and may be lawful 
for the said church wardens or vestry, or their successors, for the 
time being, or the majority of them, to take into their charge and 
possession, all and singular the records, bonds, monies and effects, 
appertaining to the said French church or congregation; and the 
monies arising from the sale of the said lands and buildings, as well 
as the bonds, monies and effects, belonging to the said French church 
or congregation, is hereby vested in the said church wardens and 
vestry, or their successors, for the time being, to and for the only 
use, benefit and advantage of the poor uf the said .parish of Saint 
Thomas and Saint Dennis, and to and for no other use or purpose 
whatsoever." 

THE FRENCH PROTESTANT OR HUGUENOT CHURCH BUILDING 

That the French Protestant or Huguenot settlers of this 
Orange Quarter had at an early date a Church building or 
house of worship of their own (with doctrine and form of 
worship distinctively French Protestant — and with a French 
Protestant Minister or Pastor who was not episcopally ordained, 
as the Rev. John La Pierre or Le Pierre 33 ) cannot be doubted. 

33 Vide Appendix No. II to the above mentioned address of J. J. Pringle Smith, 
Esquire, on the occasion of the "Special Services held at St. Philip's Church, 
Charleston, S. C, in May 1875, in commemoration of the planting of the Church 
of England in the Province of Carolina" — page 121 of pamphlet. 



50 TRANSACTIONS 

The date of its erection is not positively known; but it can be 

surely assumed that it was built shortly after the death of the 
said Caesar Moze in 1687, for the following reasons: (1) that 

the £37 sterling (bequeathed in his will "to be used in the con- 
struction of a temple or place of assemblage" in this Orange 
Quarter) had great purchasing power or value at that time, (2) 
that the building (probably plain and simple, and of wood) was 
not a large one, (3) that material for it was then and there' 
abundant, and (4) that the Congregation was then large enough 
to want and warrant the speedy construction of their "temple 
or place of assemblage." The Rev d Dr. Frederick Dalcho^and 
the Rev d Robert F. Clute, 33 Rector of the Parish of S l Thomas 
and S* Denis between 1880 and 1890, both say that it was a 
small one — D r Dalcho saying that '"They had a small church of 
their own, and it was well attended while they had a French 
Clergyman." And M r Thomas Gaillard states that "The St. 
Dennis Church, which was probably never of brick, has disap- 
peared for years." ^ 

The Rev. Albert M. Shipp, D.D., in his History of Methodism 
in South Carolina, says that their Church was built in 1708, 
but he gives no authority for this statement— if built in 1708, 
it was probably a new building for their newly created and 
established parish of S l Denis, previously whereto they must 
have had a "temple or place of assemblage" (as above shown) 
because the)- would scarcely have remained without one for 
twenty-rive (25) years or more after their settlement in this 
Quarter. Judge Smith, in his said article on "The Orange 
Quarter and the First French Settlers in South Carolina," 

34 Dalcho's Church of South Carolina, page 283. 

36 Clute's Annals and Registers of St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish, page 9. 

30 Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 5, 1897 (1S9S), 
page 04. Also, vide Judge Smith's said article on "The Orange Quarter and the 
First French settlers in South Carolina," in The South Carolina Historical and 
Genealogical Magazine of July, 1917 (Vol. XVITf, No. 3), at pages 120-121— and 
here it must be noted that the word "not" has been accidentally left out between 
Ihe word "■seems" and the words "to have been 'episcopal y ordained 1 " about the 
middle of page 121. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 51 

says (at page 121): "The Parish Church of S l Thomas was 
commenced in 1707 and finished in 1708. About the same 
time a new church building was constructed for the French 
speaking members of the parish." 

THE SITE OF THE CHURCH BUILDING 

If more than one " temple or place of assemblage" (church 
building or house of worship) were erected for the French Prot- 
estants or Huguenots of this Orange Quarter (which Judge 
Smith states was the case, as above mentioned), it is likely that 
they were on the same -site. 

Where is this Site? 

(1) Francis Pagett, by his will dated 25 th January 1730-31, 
devised to his daughter, Judith "Dallas, a "plantation lying be- 
tween Mr. Videau and the French Church of Orange Quarter, 
formerly belonging to Mr. Anthony Poitevint, containing 230 
acres of land." 37 

(2) John Mayer (styling himself "Practitioner of Physick"), 
by his deed dated 2 nd May 1774, conveyed to John Huger, 'in 
trust for William and Thomas and Joseph Mayer, brothers of 
John Mayer, and the survivors and survivor of them, until the 
youngest attained the ageof 21 years," all that Plantation or Tract of 
fifty acres of Land of him the said John Mayer in Berkley County 
on the East side of Lynches Creek bounding to the NortJi-west on 
Moses Monier North-east on John Deas South-west on said Creek 
granted unto the said John Mayer the Twenty-first day of February 
in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy 

two — ALSO ONE ACRE OF LAND COMMONLY KNOWN BY THE NAME, 

OF the FRENCH church — and also one other Trad of one hun- 
dred and ninety one acres of Land in Berkley County aforesaid 
bounding North and West on land formerly laid out to Peter 
Monier North and East on Land formerly granted to Johnson 
Lynch South and East on land formerly granted to Philemon Par- 
menter South East 36 on Lynches Creek granted unto the said John 

37 Probate Court records, Charleston County — Will Book 1729-31, page 416* 

38 "South West" instead of South East. 



52 TRANSACTIONS 

Mayer the eighteenth day of May in the year oj our Lord one thou- 
sand seven hundred and seventy lhrecJ } 3 ' J 

(3) Joseph Mayers (Mayer), by bis deeds of lease and re-lease, 
dated 18 th (17 th ?) and 18 th October 1 784, respectively, conveyed 
to Richard Dearington his 87 i acres of land, 40 (being "No. 2" 
on the Plat attached thereto) which Plat bears the following 
certificate: ; 

"South Carolina. This Plat represents part of two Tracts of Land 
formerly granted to John Mayer, one containing 50 Acres situated 
in Berkley County, butting and bounding North Westerly on" 
(land) "laid out to Moses Monnier, North East on John Deas land, 
and South West on Lynches Creek — Also One Acre commonly called 
the French Church— And also one other Tract containing one hundred 
and ninety one Acres situated in said County and parish aforesaid, 
butting and bounding to the North West on Peter Monier, North 
East on Johnson Lynch, East on Philemon Parmenter, and South 
East 41 on Lynches Creek — Which said Tract or Tracts of Land by 
the direction of llopson Pinckney, Edward Thomas, Thomas Kar- 
won and Thomas Ashby, Esquires, Commissioners appointed by the 
Honorable Court of Common Pleas for Charleston District, I have 
re-surveyed and divided the above Tract or Tracts of Lands and 
find such Shape and Forms and Marks as is laid down in the above 
delineated Plat, that is to say, the Tract No. 1 to William Mayer 
whereon the Buildings stand, the Tract No. 3 to Thomas Mayer, 
and the middle Tract No. 2 to Joseph Mayer, each containing ,S^ 
Acres. Certified this 12 th day of October in the year of our Lord 
one thousand seven hundred and eighty four 

J 3 Rivers D.S." 

Thomas Mayers (Mayer), by his deeds of lease and re-lease, 
dated 5 l ' and 6 th December, 1785, respectively, conveyed to 
Richard Dearington (as "85 acres more or less") his 87^ acres 
(being "No. 3"on said Plat), butting and bounding South East on 
land of Richard Dearington (being "No. 2 JJ on said Plat, which 
had been conveyed to him, Richard Dearington, by Joseph 

39 Mesne Conveyance Office, Charleston Count} — Book M 4, page 150. 

40 Mesne Conveyance Office, Charleston County— Book S 5, pages o64-7. 

41 "South West" instead of South Ecu!. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 53 

Mayer as aforesaid), &c. (Vide Book S 5, pages 362-4- in Mesne 
Conveyance Office, Charleston County). 

William Mayer's 87J acres (being "No. 1 " on said Plat, and 
upon which stood the Buildings) seems to have been conveyed 
as "81 acres more or less/' 5 th January, 1787, by Thomas Mayer 
(though from whom and how he Thomas Mayer, acquired the 
same does not appear) to John George Brindley, "reserving to 
Thomas Mayer and family the right of a Burial place on said 
Tract." (Vide Book K 6, page 268, Ibid). And on the 17 th 
January, 1792, John G. Brindley and three others conveyed 4 
shares of 6 shares of the same to Thomas Dearington, describing 
it as "All that plantation or trad of land known by the name of 
the French Church, containing 5S acres more or less, being four 
shares of six shares of a tract of land containing 87\ acres more or 
less, butting and bounding North West on land of Richard Dear- 
ington deceased" (being "No. 2" on said Plat, as aforesaid), 
"South East on lands of Rev. Doctor Smith" &c. (Vide Book L 6, 
page 177, Ibid). The disposition of the other 2 shares of the 
said 6 shares has not been ascertained. 

Richard Dearington, by his will (dated 24 th July, 1773, and 
proved 3 rd January, 1789), directed all his personal estate to 
be sold at public outcry and his real estate at private contract 
by his Executors, and the proceeds of such sales (after payment 
of his debts) to be equally divided between his three brothers, 
Robert and Thomas and John, whom he appointed as Execu- 
tors — Robert and Thomas qualified as Executors on the said 
3 rd January, 1789. (Vide Will Book B, 1786-1793, page 243, 
in ofrice of Probate Judge, Charleston County). 

It is presumed that the youngest of the said three brothers, 
William and Thomas and Joseph Mayer, had attained the age 
of 21 years, and that therefore proceedings for partition among 
them of the Land's conveyed to John Huger in trust for them (as 
above mentioned) were instituted in the Court of Common 
Pleas for Charleston District, under which proceedings ttte said 
Commissioners were appointed and the said re-survey and 
division and Plat made. 



54 TRANSACTIONS 

From the descriptions of the said Lands, both in Dr. John 
Mayer's said deed of conveyance to John Huger and in the 

foregoing Certificate appended to the said Plat, it is evident that 
the u One Acre of Land commonly known by the name of or called 
the French Church" was a distinct and separate piece or parcel, 
and not at that time a part of either the 50 Acres Tract or the 
191 Acres Tract — but, unfortunately, neither the said deed of 
conveyance nor the said Plat, nor any other known record, in- 
dicates or shows the relative location or position of this God's- 
Acre, so that it can be only approximately located. 

On the 6th day of April, 1916, Mr. Fred. G. Davies, the Vice- 
President of the A. C. Tuxbury Lumber Company (which Com- 
pany owns or controls extensive tracts of lands in the Parish of 
S* Thomas and S* Denis, as well as elsewhere), very kindly took 
in his automobile to this neighborhood the honorable Henry 
A. M. Smith and Mr. D. E. Huger Smith and the writer, when 
and where, by the indefatigable and invaluable assistance of 
Judge Smith, the site of the said God } s-Acre was approximately 
located at a corner formed by the Broad or Public Road (run- 
ning through the Parish of S* Thomas and S* Denis from the 
" Calais " terminus of ''Clement's Ferry" to "Huger's Bridge") 
and a' road running at right angle with and in a south-westerly 
direction from the said Broad or Public Road for about two- 
thirds of a mile to French Quarter Creek, as indicated and marked 
on Judge Smith's valuable Map which accompanies his said 
article on "Quenby and the Eastern Branch oi Cooper 
River. "«." 

Since then, however, it has occurred to the writer that such 
site may be only three hundred to four hundred yards instead 
of about two-thirds of a mile from French Quarter Creek, and 
that it may be the same as the site of D r John Mayer's resi- 
dence (which stood on the said road running from the said Broad 
or Public Road, but which has long since disappeared), inasmuch 
as Mr. Daniel Ravenel, in his said "Historical Sketch of the 

d2 The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Vol. XVIII, page 3, 
January, 1917. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY 01 SOUTH CAROLINA 55 

Huguenot Congregations of South Carolina," states : "Their Church 
is said to have been upon this creek" — and also, " Hy the recital 

in an Act of Assembly dated 1764, 1;> we find that the 

families of the French, which formerly worshipped here, being 
then acquainted with the English language, attended the Parish 
Church of St. Thomas. That Act therefore authorized the Vestry 
and Wardens of St. Thomas' to sell the Church no longer required 
for use. It was sold accordingly, and purchased as a residence, for 
a very small sum, by Dr. Meyer" 4 * (Dr. John Mayer). 

A Plat by Joseph Purcell, attached to a Bond (dated l 6t June, 
1774) of Doctor John Mayer to the Rev. Robert Smith, 45 shows 
u Doctor Mayer's House" at a spot only about three hundred to 
four hundred yards north-eastward from Lynches (French 
Quarter) Creek. 

The President's Address, in Transactions of the Huguenot 
Society of South Carolina, No. 22, 1916, mentions (at page 9) 
that the site of the old French Protestant or Huguenot Church 
at the Orange Quarter "has been located with sufficient exact- 
ness to justify the Society in erecting a monument to perpetuate 
such site, as has heretofore been done in the case of the site of 
the old French Protestant or Huguenot Church in the Parish of 
St. James, Goose Creek." But it may be that a slight change 
of the site should be made from the spot, indicated and marked 
on Judge Smith's said Map as u Church of St. Denis" to the spot 
nearer to French Quarter Creek, indicated and marked on 
Joseph Purcell's said Plat as "D r Mayer's House." 

An old Map of the original County of Berkley and its Parishes 
(made by Herman Moll, "Geog r ," sometime after the year 1711, 
and a copy of which Map is to be found at page 281 of the Year 
Book of the City of Charleston for 1886, and also as a frontis- 
piece to "The History of South Carolina under the Proprietary 
Government 1670-17l9"by Edward McCrady) shows'^/. Denis 
Ch." as located very near to or upon Wando River and the 

« It should be 1768— Statutes of South Carolina, Vol. IX, page 225. 
44 Transactions Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 7, 1900, page 42. 
46 Mesne Conveyance Ofiice, Charleston County — Book M 4, pages 206-8. 



56 TRANSACTIONS 

line of division between St. Thomas' Parish and Christ Church 

Parish and not far from the present village of Wando (Cainhoy 16 
as it was formerly called), in the extreme south-eastern part 
of "St. Thomas Parish with y e French Settlement at Orange 
Quarter called St. Denis." But this location of St. Denis 
Church is clearly wrong, because "y e French Settlement at 
Orange Quarter called St. Denis" was on Lynch's or 
French Quarter Creek, in the extreme norllicrn or north-western 
part of the Parish of St. Thomas and St. Denis, about 
five to ten miles north-west from the location on said Map 
of "St. Denis Ch." 

There is no record extant of any deed of conveyance of the 
"One Acre of Land commonly known by the name of or called the 
French Church" for the use and benefit and behoof of the French 
Protestant Congregation of "Orange Quarter (St. Denis)," 
showing the names of the grantor and the grantee and the date 
of conveyance and also whether it was a gift or based on valua- 
ble consideration — so that it is impossible to tell whether it 
was granted by deed (in pais) or by parol — probably it was a 
gift, and (if given and granted by deed, prior to the said Church 
Act of November 30, 1706) it must have been granted to some 
person or persons in trust for said Congregation, as the Con- 
gregation was not a corporate body capable of owning and hold- 
ing property and as there was not then in existence any ecclesias- 
tical corporation sole or otherwise in the parish of St. Denis 
(indeed the parish of St. Denis was not created and established 
until November 30, 1706), or else (if given ami granted by 
parol) its adverse possession and use presumably ripened into 
title. 

It may be that, prior to the said Church Act of November 30, 
1706, such God's- Acre was donated, for the use and benefit and 
behoof of the French Protestant Congregation of this Quarter, 
by Peter Dutartre, to whom the Tracts of Land, described as 
containing 230 acres (of which such God's- A ere was evidently a 

40 Cainhoy was previously named Louisville — Statutes of South Carolina, Vol 
XII, page 504. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 57 

part originally), had been granted on the 12th May, 1697 47 and 
which Tracts of Land seem to have escheated about 1724 and 
were re-granted to Dr. John Mayer by two separate grants, (1; 
the Tract, containing 50 acres, '(being part of a tract formerly 
laid out to Peter Monier but not granted)/' in February, 1772, 1 * 
and (2) the Tract (contiguous thereto), containing 191 Acres 1 
Rood 27 Perches, in May, 1773. 49 The said God's- Acre was 
in all probability a part of the latter Tract of 191 Acres 1 Rood 
27 Perches originally. 

PARSONAGE HOUSE AND GLEBE 

By an Indenture (dated 1 st May, A.D. 1731) Nicholas Bochet 
and Mary his wife, "for and in consideration of the love and affec- 
tion that they do bear unto the Evangelist of our blessed Lord and 
Saviour Jesus Christ and tmto the Church of the same belonging to 
the French Protestants and whereof they profess themselves members 
thereof, do give, grant and confirm (in the method and with the con- 
ditions hereafter and herein mentioned and specified) one Planta- 
tion in Berkley County containing one hundred acres of Land 
which the said Nicholas Bochet lately purchased of Peter Johnson 
Sen'r for the consideration of one hundred and twenty five Pounds 
current money as may appear by ,} 50 .... The record 
here ceases to be decipherable, as it is very old, and (for at- 
tempted preservation) has had thin parchment paper pasted 
over it. But, fortunately, clear indication of the undecipher- 
able part of the record (including the said "method" and 
" conditions") is given by the following entry in the Direct 
Index (1719-1764): " Bochet, NicVs, &• wife" (Lessor) to "the 
Church of the Parish of St. Dennis" (Lessee) — "Gift— 100 Acres 
do" (of land) "on the S. E. side of the Eastern Branch of the T of 
Cooper River for a Parsonage House & Glebe to the said French 

47 "Recitals of Grants," 1696-1739, Book No. 1, page 67, in the office of the 
Secretary of State of South Carolina. 

* a Vide Plat recorded at page 76, Vol. IS, Ibid. 
4 > Vide Plat recorded at page 75, Vol. 18, Ibid. 
60 Mesne Conveyance Office, Charleston Comity, Book I, page 311. 



58 TRANSACTIONS 

Parish of St. Dennis during the time of the divine service be in the 
French Language" In the latter part of this indenture, which 
is partially decipherable, there is a recital that "most of the 
French Inhabitants of the s d Parrish of S l Dennis and others 
have liberally contributed towards the building of a Parsonage 
house On the land and other charges to make it convenient for 
a minister to dwell there." 

It is to be observed that no grantee is actually named in this 
Indenture unless it be in the habendum clause which is unde- 
cipherable—but, as the Gift was made after the Parish of St. 
Denis had been created and established by the said Church Act 
of November 30, 1706, title to the 100 Acres of Land most 
probably vested directly in the then Rector or Minister of the 
Parish (Rev. John James Tissot) as the corporate body (cor- 
poration sole) of the Parish. 

The exact location of this Parsonage House and Glebe has not 
been ascertained, although its buttings and boundings are given 
in the description of the same 100 Acres in a later conveyance in 
fee for valuable consideration (£80 lawful money of the Province 
of South Carolina), by deeds of lease and release (dated 5 th and 
6 th April, 1762), from Peter Bochet (son and heir of Nicholas 
Bochet, deceased) to The Reverend Mr. John James Tissot 
(incumbent of the French Congregation in the Parish of St. 
Thomas and St. Dennis), in his own individual right, and not 
in his corporate capacity as ''corporation sole" of St. Denis', 
as follows: — "All that Messuage or Tenement, Plantation or 
Trad of Land, commonly called or known by the name of the 
French Parsonage, situate in the Parish of St. Thomas aforesaid 
on the South East side of the Eastern Branch of the T of Cooper 
River, Butting' and Bounding to the South West on a large Creek 
commonly called Lynches Creek, to the South East on land which 
{when the above mentioned premises were granted) belonged to 
Nicholas Bochet (Father of the present Grantor), to the North-East 
on Lands of Johnson Lynch, and to the North West on the lands 
of George June" (Juin?) " containing One hundred acres English 
measure, which ivas granted by James Moore Esq* Governor &c 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 59 

unto Joseph Marbeuff 4 th June 1701, and by the said Josepli 
Marbeujf was sold & conveyed unto Gedeon 6* Gabriel Ferron 22 nd 
Jan'ry 1703/4, and by the said Gabriel Ferron (surviving purchaser 
&* heir to Gedeon Ferron) and his wife Catherine was granted & 
conveyed unto Andrew Dupuy 17 th January 1711/2, and by the 
said Andrew Dupuy and Jane his wife was granted bargained 
and sold unto the Reverend Mr. John Lapierre 8 th November 1716, 
and by the said John Lapierre and Susanna his wife was granted 
and conveyed ulito Michael Blackwell 28 th November 1717, and 
by the said Michael Blackwell was granted & conveyed unto Peter 
Johnson Sen 1 15 th June 1723, and by the said Peter Johnson was 
granted & conveyed unto Nicholas Bochet 17 th & 18 th November 
1730r 

In the foregoing description, it will be noted that the Reverend 
Mr. John Lapierre seems to have purchased the said 100 Acres 
of Andrew Dupuy on the 8 th November, 1716, (fourteen to fifteen 
years before Nicholas Bochet and Mary his wife gave and granted 
the same to the Church of the Parish of St. Denis, as aforesaid), 
and to have continued to be the owner thereof in his own in- 
dividual right from that date to November 28, 1717, when he 
and Susanna his wife sold and conveyed the same to Michael 
Blackwell. 

And it is presumed that the said 100 Acres reverted to Peter 
Bochet (son and heir of Nicholas Bochet, deceased) when the 
French language ceased to be used in the divine service in the 
French Parish of St. Denis, whereby and whereupon the 
"method" and "conditions" (mentioned and specified in the 
above mentioned defeasible gift and grant of 1 st May, 1731, 
from Nicholas Bochet and Mary his wife to the Church of the 
Parish of St. Denis) were broken. 



Ilelas! "Orange Quarter (St. Denis), " as a French Protestant 
or Huguenot centre or settlement, is now well-nigh extinct — in 
consequence of the War between the States of 1861-5, its 



60 TRANSACTIONS 

former French inhabitants, or almost all of them, have no longer 
"a local habitation" there, but "a name" only -they are ''gone 
like the singing birds of those times that now sing no more/' 
so that " their habitation" is "void" and there are noiit of 
them or their children "to dwell in their tents." Of all the 
names of the French Protestant or Huguenot families of the 
Quarter, that once existed and were well known there, not more 
than three (3) perhaps are now known in the neighborhood, to 
wit: (I) Combe, in the person possibly of Elias Cumbee, who 
owns and lives on Northampton plantation, which lies near to, 
if not in, the old Quarter — (2) Laurens, in the person of M ra 
Annie Laurens deSaussure (nee Laurens), widow of James P. 
deSaussure, deceased, who owns Campvere plantation, which 
lies in the old Quarter, but who resides at Charleston — and (3) 
Simons, in the person of old Mr. Benjamin B. Simons, who 
dwells with his son-in-law, Mr. John Coming Ball, at Middleburg 
plantation, which lies very near to or in the old Quarter. 

Verily, "Change and decay in all around I see" — except in 
"JESUS CHRIST the same yesterday, and to-day, and forever." 

Finis 

N. B. — The writer hopes to complete, for publication in the next Transactions 
of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, a sketch of the Huguenot centre or 
settlement called "St. John's, Berkley." 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



61 



WILL OF CAESAR MOZE 



Au Nom de Dieu. Soit. 1 
Comme tous lesmomensdela 
vie sont incertains, & que nous 
devons estre toujours prest de 
nous resigner a. la volontel de 
Dieu soit en la vie soit en la 
mort, estant a present detenu 
de maladie apres avoir mis mon 
ame entre les mains de ce mis- 
ericordieux Seigneur avec une 
entiere coniiance du pardon de 
mes peehes par les merites de 
Jesus Christ mon Sauveur. 
Je Caesar Moze declare par ces 
presentes comme estant mon 
Testament et derniere vo- 
lonte qu'au cas qu'il plus a 
Dieu disposer de moy p r une 
autre vie que Je cede a Mons r 
Nicolas Meran, avec lequel 
Je suis presentement demeur- 
ant a la Caroline, la planta- 
tion a laquelle nous sommes 
conjoint ement interesses size 
sur la branche de L'Est du :T: 
sur la Riviere de Cooper en 
cette province de la Caroline 
avec toutes les dependances 
de la d tu plantation mon es- 
clave & toutes les autres pre- 
tenssions que J 'ay a la Caro- 

J Of record at page 283 of Will Book in 
Office of the Historical Commission 
of South Carolina. 



In the name of God. Amen. 

As all the moments of life 
are uncertain and as we must be 
always ready to resign our- 
selves to the will of God in 
life or in death, being now 
ill, after placing my soul in 
the hands of that merciful 
Lord with entire confidence of 
the forgiveness of my sins 
through the merits of Jesus 
Christ my Saviour, I, Caesar 
Moze, declare by these pres- 
ents, as being rny Testament 
and last will, that, in case it 
should please God to dispose 
of me for another life, I give 
to Mr. Nicolas Meran, with 
whom I now live in Carolina, 
the plantation in which we 
are jointly interested, situated 
on the eastern branch of the 
"T" upon the Cooper river 
in this province of Carolina, 
with all the appurtenances of 
the said plantation, my slave 
and all the other claims that 
I have in Carolina, as also 
twelve pounds sterling, which 
I am expecting and which ought 
to be remitted to me in mer- 
chandize from London by Mr. 
Rene Baudouin, on the condi- 
tion of the said Mr. Nicolas 



62 



TRANSACTIONS 



line comme aussy douze livres 
Sterling que J'attens et qui me 
doivent estre remises en mar- 
chandize de Londres par 
Mons r Rene Baudouin aux 
conditions par le dit S r Nico- 
las Meran de payer premiere- 
ment a M r Boudinot marchand 
presentement a la Carolina la 
somme de quartre vingt livres 
Sterling en marchandize ou 
soixante livres Sterling argent 
comptant de la quelle somme 
le d* S r Boudinot tiendra 
compte & remettra en mains 
du S r Louis Moze mon ffrere 
p r en disposer comme de son 
propre comme un don et legs 
que Je luy fais plus le d* S r 
Meran payera trente sept 
livres Sterling que je donne a 
L'Eglise des Protestants ffran- 
cois refugies en ce pays de la 
Caroline p r s'en servir a la Con- 
struction d'un temple on lieu 
d'assemblee des d ts Protestants 
Refugies qui se fera au lieu 
qui sera trouve le plus con- 
venable proche & dans le 
voisinage de la d t0 Planta- 
tion ou le dit S r Meran & moy 
avons interest le choix s'en 
devant aussy ff ra avec la par- 
ticipation du d* S r Meran, 
laquelle somme sera aussy 
paye argent comptant. Da- 



Meran first paying to Mr. 
Boudinot, merchant now in 
Carolina, the sum of eighty 
pounds sterling in merchandize 
or sixty pounds sterling in 
cash or ready money, of which 
sum the said Mr. Boudinot 
shall keep account and shall de- 
liver into the hands of Mr. Louis 
Moze, my brother, to dispose 
of it as his own as a gift and 
legacy which I make to him. 
In addition, the said Mr. 
Meran shall pay thirty seven 
pounds sterling, which I give 
to the church of the French 
Protestant Refugees in this 
country of Carolina to be used 
in the construction of a Temf 
pie or Place of Assemblage o- 
(or for) the said Protestant 
Refugees, which shall be done 
at the place that will be found 
the most conveniently near to 
and in the vicinity of the said 
plantation wherein the said 
Mr. Meran and myself have 
interest, the choice of the 
same to be made also with the 
participation of the said 
Mr. Meran, which sum shall be 
also paid in cash or read)' 
money. Furthermore, I give 
to Frances, his servant, five 
pounds sterling in merchan- 
dize, or three pounds in money, 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



63 



vantage Je donne a ffrancoise 
sa servante cinq livres Ster- 
ling en marchandize, ou trois 
livres en argent si elle le desire 
p r Rentier et parfait payem* 
des d U:i sommes la plantation 
susd tc demeure hypotequee et 
en garantie, ce que j 'ay signe 
et scelle estant sain d'entende- 
nient et de ma meure et par- 
faite volonte et delivre entre 
les mains du d fc S r Meran que 
Je declare Executeur de mon 
present Testament conjoin- 
tem* avec le S r Boudinot fait 
a la Caroline presence des S ra 
Jacob Guerrard Esq r et Isaac 
le Noir le vingt Juin mil six 
cents quartre vingt sept. 

Caesar Moze [seal] 

J. Guerard 1 rn 

i T > lesmoins. 

J. Lenoir J 



if she desire it. For the full 
and complete payment of the 
said sums the plantation afore- 
said stands mortgaged and as 
security. This I have signed 
and sealed (being sound of 
understanding and with my 
will or mind mature and per- 
fect) and delivered into the 
hands of the said Mr. Meran, 
whom I hereby declare Exec- 
utor of my present Testament 
conjointly with Mr. Boudinot. 
Done in presence of the Messrs 
Jacob Guerrard, Esq. and Isaac 
le Noir the twentieth of June 
one thousand six hundred & 
eighty seven. 

Cesar Moze [seal] 

J. Guerard 1 ' . 

J T ^Witnesses. 

J. Lenoir J . 



By the honoble the Governo r 
This day appeared before me M r Jacob Guerrard who upon the 
holy Evangelist did declare that he Did see the within named 
Caesar Moze seale, signe, publish and declare the within to be 
his last will & Testam*. 

7 th July 1687 Sworne before me J. Guerard. 

Ja: Colleton 
This day likewise appeared before me M r . Peter Jacob Guerard 
& M r . Isaac Lenoir who upon the holy Evangelist did declare 
the within to be his that he did see the within Caesar Moze 
Seale, Signe, publish & declare the within to be his last will & 
testam*. 

16 Aug 4 . 1687 Sworne before P. J. Guerard 

me Ja: Colleton J. Lenoir 



64 TRANSACTIONS 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE HUGUENOT 

SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 

CONSTITUTION 

Article I 

Name 

The name of this organization shall be "The Huguenot Society ov Souib 

Carolina." 

Article II 
Object 

The object of the Society shall be: 

Firstly, To perpetuate the memory and to foster and promote the principles 
and virtues of the Huguenots. 

Secondly, To publicly commemorate at stated times the principal events in the 
history of the Huguenots. 

Thirdly, To discover, collect and preserve all still existing documents, mon- 
uments, etc., relating to the genealogy or history of the Huguenots of America in 
general, and to those of South Carolina in particular. 

Fourthly, To gather by degrees a library for the use of the -Society, composed 
of all obtainable books, monographs, pamphlets, manuscripts, etc., relating to the 
Huguenots. 

Fifthly, To cause statedly to be prepared and read before the Society, papers, 
essays, etc., on Huguenot history or genealogy and collateral subjects. 

Article III 

Membership 

Section 1. The membership of this Society shall be as follows: 

Firstly, S A\\ descendants in the direct male or female lines of the Huguenot 
families which emigrated to America prior to the promulgation of the Edict of 
Toleration, November 28, 17S7. 

Secondly, Representatives of other French families, whose profession of the 
Protestant Faith is anterior to the promulgation of the Edict of Toleration, 
November 28, 1787. 

Thirdly, Pastors of French Huguenot congregations in South Carolina. 

Fourthly, Writers who have made the history, genealogy, principles, etc., of the 
Huguenots a special subject of study and research, to whatever nationality they 
may belong. 

Section 2. The members of the Society may consist of three classes: Resi- 
dent, Corresponding and Honorary; but the rights and privileges of each class 
shall be the same. 

Section 3. The annual fees of Resident and Corresponding members shall 
be one dollar, and the payment of twenty dollars shall constitute one a life mem- 
ber. All dues shall be paid in advance. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 65 

Section 4. The funds of this Society shall be applied only to the furtherance 
and realization of the objects contemplated in this constitution. 

Section 5. All life-membership fees shall be invested by the Executive Com- 
mittee (hereinafter provided for) in the name of the Society, and only the interest 
arising therefrom shall be used for the purposes of the Society. 

Section 6. Application for membership, with a statement of the name, 
address, profession, and descent of the applicant, shall be made in writing to 
the Executive Committee, who shall report thereon at the next meeting of the 
Society. 

If the Committee's report be favorable to any applicants, a majority vote of 
the members present shall be required to elect such applicants; but, if the Com- 
mittee's report be unfavorable to any applicants, such unfavorable report shall 
be considered as confirmed without a vote of the Society, unless three members 
object, in which case a vote by ballot shall be taken for each of such applicants 
separately and a two-thirds vote of the members present shall be required to reject 
such unfavorable report and to elect such applicant. Membership shall begin 
with the Anniversary Meeting (April 13) at which the applicant may be elected, 
or (if elected at a meeting other than an Anniversary Meeting) then with the 
Anniversary Meeting next after such other meeting. 

Every application for membership shall be accompanied by one year's dues- 

Article IV 
Officers 

Section 1. The officers of the Society shall consist of a President, a Vice- 
President for each of the seven original Huguenot centres or settlements in South 
Carolina, a Secretary and Treasurer, an Historian, and a Chaplain, and an Execu- 
tive Committee composed of the President and the seven Vice-Presidents and the 
Secretary and Treasurer and the Historian (and all ex-Presidents of the Society 
shall be advisory members of said Committee with all the privileges of member- 
ship except the right to vote). 

Section 2. Besides the ordinary rights and duties of a presiding officer, the 
President shall appoint the places of meeting; in conjunction with the Secretary 
and Treasurer he shall have the power, and upon the written request of five mem- 
bers it shall be his duty, to call special meetings of the Society; and he shall sign 
all drafts drawn on the Treasurer. 

Section 3. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Presidents to interest in the objects 
of this Society the Huguenots of the localities which they represent; in the absence 
of the President of this Society, a Vice-President shall preside and exercise all the 
rights and privileges of the President; and if more than one Vice-President be 
present, the senior Vice-President in attendance shall be the presiding officer. 

Section 4. It shall be the duty of the Secretary and Treasurer to keep an 
accurate record of all the proceedings of the Society and of the Executive Com- 
mittee; to conduct the correspondence of the Society; to notify members of the 
meetings of the Society; to inform officers and new members of their election. 

It shall also be his duty to collect all dues, fees and other moneys belonging to 
the Society, and to deposit the same in some bank in the City of Charleston in 



66 TRANSACTIONS 

the name of the Society. Out of these funds he shall pay such sums only as may 
be ordered by the Society through its President, or the Executive Committee. He 

shall keep an accurate account of its receipts and disbursements, and render an 
account of the same at each annual meeting of the Society, which shall name a 
committee to audit them. For his services he shall be allowed ten per centum 
of all amounts collected by him. 

Section 5. It shall be the duty of the Historian to have in his keeping all 
books, pamphlets, manuscripts, etc., pertaining or belonging to the Society, and 
to receive and collect data relating to the History of the Huguenots before and 
since their settlement in America. 

Section G.< It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee to examine and 
pass upon the credentials of candidates; to invest and manage the funds of the 
Society; to engage suitable persons to deliver the addresses and prepare the papers 
contemplated in this Constitution; and to make all other arrangements necessary 
for the meetings of the Society; and to transact all business of the Society not 
otherwise provided for in the Constitution. 

Section 7. The officers of the Society shall be annually elected at the anni- 
versary meeting; but, if any vacancy occur during the year, the Executive Com- 
mittee shall have power to appoint a member of the Society to fill such vacancy 
for the unexpired term. 

Article V 
Meetings 

This Society shall hold two regular meetings each year, and, in accordance with 
the purpose of the Society, the said meetings shall take place on the following 
historical dates: 

Section 1. The Anniversary Meeting shall be held on April 13, the day of 
the Promulgation of the Edict of Nantes, granting Freedom of Worship to the 
Huguenots of France. 

Section 2. The Autumn Meeting of the Society shall be held on the 22nd of 
October, the day of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. 

SECTION 3. The Executive Committee shall have the power to arrange fur a 
dinner, or other collation, annually, as they may deem most appropriate. 

Section 4. In case any of these dates should fall upon a day inconvenient for 
the proper celebration thereof, the Executive Committee shall appoint for the 
meeting the next most convenient day. 



BY-LAWS 

Section 1. Notices of meetings shall be given at least one week in advance. 

Section 2. It shall always require fifteen members to constitute a quorum for 
the transaction of business, and three (3) shall constitute a quorum of the Execu- 
tive Committee. 

Section 3. At all meetings of the Society the order of business shall be as 
follows: 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 67 

Prayer. 

1. The reading and adopting of the minutes of the previous meeting. 

2. Reports of officers. 

3. Report of the Executive Committee. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Reports of special committees. 

6. Miscellaneous business. 

7. Election of officers. 

8. The reading of papers or delivery of addresses before the Society. 

9. Adjournment. 

Section 4. All resolutions must be presented in writing to the Chair. 

Section 5. If any member neglect or refuse to pay his annual fee for two con- 
secutive years, the Treasurer shall report his name to the Executive Committee, 
who may strike his name from the roll of membership. 

Section 6. Such members of the Society as do not themselves bear Huguenot 
names shall add to their own names the Huguenot names through which they claim 
descent. 

It shall be the duty of the Secretary, in addition to his other duties, to keep a 
list of the members by card or otherwise and on such list to write after the name 
of each member the name or names of the Huguenots through whom he or she 
claims descent, under subdivision " Firstly" of Section 1, Article III of the 
Constitution, as shown by his or her written application for membership — or else 
his or her qualification for membership otherwise than by descent, under subdivi- 
sions "Secondly" and "Thirdly" and "Fourthly" of Section 1, Article HI, of 
the Constitution. 

Section 7. The original Huguenot centres or settlements in this State (each 
one of which is entitled to a Vice-President) are as follows: (1) Charleston, (2) 
Goose Creek, (3) Orange Quarter (St. Denis), (4) French Santee, (5) St. John's, 
Berkley, (6) Purysburg, and (7) New Bordeaux. 

Section 8. The Constitution and By-Laws of this Society may be amended 
or repealed at any meeting of the Society by a two-thirds vote; but the changes 
proposed must have been submitted at a previous meeting. They may also be 
amended or repealed by a vote of a majority of all the members of the Executive 
Committee at any meeting during the recess of the Society: Provided, the amend- 
ment so adopted shall be confirmed at the next meeting of the Society. 



68 TRANSACTIONS 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE SOCIETY 

Transactions No. 1. Published in 1889. 

An account of the organization of the Society in 1885. 
List of charter members. 
List of officers, 1885 to 1889. 

Memorial to Genl. Wilmot G. deSaussiire, late president of the Society. 
Short sketches of the lives of late members. 
The President's Address. 
Address by Wm. St. Julien Jervey, Esq. 
Transactions No. 2. Published in 1889. 

An historical sermon delivered at the French Protestant Church, on Sun- 
day, April 13, 1890, by the Rev. Charles S. Vedder, D.D., Pastor; with 

picture of Church and List of Pastors from 1880 to 1890. 
Proceedings of the Anniversary Meeting, April 14, 1890. 
Ivry, a poem by Rev. C. S. Vedder, D.D. 
An address before the Society by Hon. Thomas F. Bayard. 
Transactions No. 3. Published in 1894. 

Report of President Wm. St. Julien Jervey, at Anniversary Meeting, April 

13, 1891, and list of officers of the Society. 
The President's Addresses at Anniversary Meetings of 1893 and 1894. 
List of officers and list of members elected since 1890. 
Short sketches of the lives of deceased members. 
An address before the Society, on the Early Huguenots and their Emigration 

to America, by Gabriel E. Manigault, M.D. 
Transactions No. 4. Published in 1897. 

Papers on some Early Huguenot Families in South Carolina: a, The Legare 

Family; b, The Fluger Family, with pedigree; c, The Marion Family; 

d, The Manigault Family from 1665 to 1886, with portraits. 
A paper on the Huguenot Influence in Colonial South Carolina, by Rev. 

Robt. Wilson, D.D. 
Sketches. of the lives of late deceased members oi the Society. 
Transactions No. 5. Published in 18^8. 

The First Huguenot Immigrants from 1070 to 1680, 1680 to 1690, 1690 to 

1700. 
Hostility of the English Settlers to the French. 
Naturalization of Huguenot Refugees. 

List of names of French and Swiss Huguenots Refugees in Carolina. 
Character of the Huguenots. 
The Huguenot Church in South Carolina; St. John's Parish, Berkley; St. 

Denis' Parish, "Orange Quarter;" Settlement and Church on Santee River. 
The Huguenots of Abbeville, S. C. 
Founding of the South Carolina Society of Charleston. 
Notices of Conspicuous Members of the Gaillard Family. 
Transactions No. 6.' Published in 1899. 

An Historical Sketch of the Prioleau Family in Europe and America, with 

illustrations, by Rev. Robt. Wilson, D.D., and Gabriel Manigault, M.D. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 69 

The Ravenel Family in France and America, by Daniel Ravenel, Sr. 
Necrology 1896-1897. 
Transactions No. 7. Published in 1900. 

Proceedings of the Fifteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, April 21, 

1900. 
An Historical Sketch of the Huguenot Congregations of South Carolina: 

French Santee; Orange Quarter; St. John's, Berkley; the Church at Charles- 
ton: etc. — by the late Daniel Ravenel, of Charleston, with notes by the 

late Gen. Wilmot G. DeSaussure, of Charleston. 
Transactions No. 8. Published in 1901. 

Proceedings of the Sixteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, April 13, 

1901. 
The President's Address. 
R6sume" of Transactions, 1897 to 1901. 
Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 

List of members with names of original Huguenot Families from whom de- 
scended. 
Letter from the Honorable Alfred Huger, upon the death of Mr. 

Petigru. 
A Narrative of the Life and Services of Francis G. DeLieseline during the 

War of the American Revolution, contributed by Dr. Wm. C. Ravenel. 
Transactions No. 9. Published in 1902. 

Minutes of the Seventeenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, April 17, 

1902. 
The President's address. 
An address on the Early Huguenots, delivered before the Society by Col. 

Richard L. Maury, of Richmond, Va. 
Constitution and By-Laws of the Society. 
Enlarged and revised list of members, with name ox names of persons from 

whom they derive their descent. 
Transactions No. 10. Published in 1903. 

Minutes of the Eighteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held April 

15, 1903. 
The President's Address. 
Some wills of South Carolina Huguenots; copies in original French, with 

translations in English. 
A paper, entitled The Huguenots in Dublin, by Rev. Robert Wilson, D.D. 
Transactions No. 11. Published in 1904. 

Minutes of the Nineteenth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held April 

13, 1904. 
The President's Address, 
A brief memorial to Francis Marion. 
"The Huguenots of South Carolina," an Address before the Society, by Mr. 

Thomas W. Bacot. 
Some wills of South Carolina Huguenots; copies in original French, with 

translations in English; with comments by Rev. Robert Wilson, D.D. 

Continued from No. 10. 



70 TRANSACTIONS 

Transactions No. 12. Published in 190.S. 

Minutes of the Twentieth Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held April 

13, 1905. 
The President's Address. 

Huguenot Immigration in South Carolina by Henry A. DeSaussure, Esq. 
A Short Story of Three Brothers, by Ida II. Layard. 
Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 
Transactions No. 13. Published in 1906. 

Minutes of the Twenty-first Anniversary Meeting of the Society, held April 

20, 1906. 
The President's Address. 

The French Protestant Church, Paper read by Miss Ravenel. 
Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

Upper Beat of St. John's, Berkley, by late Prof. F. A. Porcher. 
Antoine Gabeau, by Miss Willis. 
Additional Data on Cordes Family. Maj. J. J. Lucas and D. E. Huger 

Smith, Esq. 
Old Document on Bruneau Family. Mr. A. S. Salley, Jr. 
Notes from Crottet MSS. 
Transactions No. 14. Published in 1907. 

Minutes of Twenty-second Anniversary Meeting. 
The President's Address. 

Huguenots on Santee River, by the late Henry A. DeSaussure. 
Wills of South Carolina Huguenots, Editorial Notes. 
Dr. J. L. E. W. Shecut, Miss Eola Willis. 
Ribault's Fort, Miss Jsabelle DeSaussure. 
Notes on Gaillard Family. 

Letter from Benj. Mazyck to Capt. Daniel Ravenel, dated June 28, 1776. 
List of members. 
Transactions No. 15. Published in 1908. 

Minutes of the Twenty-third Anniversary Meeting. 
The President's Address. 
Poem. The Bretons. 
Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 
Editorial Notes. • 

Notice of Ren6 Ravenel, Immigrant. 
The Last of the Huguenots. Stephen Thomas. 
The Isle of Oleron. M. M. de Richmond and M. Paul Thomas. 
List of members, revised. 
Transactions No. 16. Published in 1909. 

Minutes of Twenty-fourth Anniversary Meeting. 

The President's Address. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

The State of French Protestants after 1685. 

Correspondence relative to gift to Society of site of Old Goose Creek French 

Church. 
Plats showing site of old Goose Creek French Church. 



HUGUENOT SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 71 

The French Huguenot Church of the Parish of St. James, Goose Creek. 

List of members, revised. 
Transactions No. 17. Published in 1910. 

Minutes of Twenty-fifth Anniversary Meeting. 

The President's Address. 

Wills of South Carolina Huguenots. 

The Huguenots in America. By Hon. A. T. Clearwater. 

Notes on Theodore Sompayrac. 

Letter concerning Rev. Mons. Pouderous. 

Huguenot Lineage of Erroll H. Colcock. 

Book Notices: "d,es Freres Gibert." The Journal of American History, Vol. 
XIX, No. Ill, 3d Quarter. 
Transactions No. 18. Published in 1911. 

Minutes ofTwenty-sixth Anniversary Meeting. 

The President's Address. 

Account of Porcher Family, by Mrs. Wickham. 

Book Notices — La Reforme dans L'Isle D'Oleron, Par Paul Thomas, Capaci- 
taire en Droit. Ouvrage Orne de onze illustrations. Lezay. Irnprimerie- 
Libraire H. Canon. 1911. 
Transactions No. 19. Published in 1912. 

Minutes of the Twenty-seventh Anniversary Meeting. 

The President's Address. 

The- French Protestants of Abbeville, S. C, 1761-1765. 

List of South Carolina names in the registers of the French Churches in 
England. 

An address on Huguenots in America. 

Revised list of members of the Society. 
Transactions No. 20— Published in 1915. 

Minutes of the Twenty-eighth Anniversary Meeting. 

Minutes of Twtenty-ninth Anniversary Meeting. 

The President's Address. 

Charter of the Society. 

Deed of Conveyance of Old Huguenot Goose Creek Church site to the Society 
with sketch map. 

Picture of Granite Cross marking site of Old French Protestant Church at the 
head of Goose Creek, S. C. 

"The Edict of Toleration 1787." Address delivered by the Rev. Florian 
Vurpillot. 

The late David du Bose Gaillard, Lieutenant Colonel U. S. Army, with picture 
of monument in Huguenot Church. 

"The Huguenots" from Daily Telegraph, London, England, with a picture of 
an Old Huguenot Church in London. 

Huguenots, the First Textile Manufacturers. 
Transactions No. 21. Published 1916. 

Minutes of the Thirtieth Anniversary Meeting. 

The President's Address. 

Report of Officers. Thirtieth Anniversary Meeting. 



72 TRANSACTIONS 

"The Planters of St. John's/' Address delivered by Professor Yates Snowden. 
"The Influence of the Huguenots in the United States of America," \)t. 

J. G. B. Bulloch of Washington, I). C. 
"The Influence of the Huguenots in the United States of America," 11 y 

O. B. DuBois, of Weehawken, N. J. 
A Certificate of Naturalization. 
An Interesting and Valuable Old Record. Photographic reproduction of 

pages in old Probate Court record book 1692 to 1700. 
An Interesting Old Document. 
Transactions No. '22. Published in 1917. 

Minutes of the Thirty-first Anniversary Meeting. 

The President's Address. 

Minutes of special meeting, May 22, 1916. 

"The Influence of Religious Persecution on Huguenot Colonization." 

Address delivered by Hon. Alexander R. Lawton. 
The Marion family. 
Will of Benjamin Marion. 
Revised list of members of Society. 
Amended Constitution and By-Laws. 

All members In good standing receive the Transactions from date of their mem- 
bership without charge. A list of such numbers of the Transactions as may be extant, 
with the prices of same, can be had by any one desiring copies upon application to 
the Secretary. 

Address all communications to Daniel Ravenel, Secretary, No. 54 broad Street, 
Charleston, S.' C. 



INDEX 

Page 

Address of the President 10-13 

Address of Hon. Henry A. duPont 24-36 

Annual Account of the Treasurer 21 

Application Blank for Membership After Index (at end) 

By-Laws of the Society 66-67 

Constitution of the Society 64-66 

Deaths 1916-17 10 and 15 

Exchanges 1 4-1 5 

Minutes of Anniversary Meeting of April 13, 1917 6-9 

New Members 1916-17 16-18 

Notes of Information for Members 3 (in front) 

Officers of the Society 1917-18. 5 and 8 

"Orange Quarter (St. Denis)," sketch of 37-60 

Publications of the Society 68-72 

Report of Executive Committee 14-20 

Report of Historian 22-23 

Will of Caesar Moze" 61-63 



7 3 46 1